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Best chub baits


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#11 Guest_tigger_*

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 12:19 PM

Nearly all my chub fishing is done with maggots (Occasionally lobs or bread). The trick here is to keep trickling in the bait to get them feeding confidently.....
C.



Same here, we know chub will eat all manner of baits but I find maggots my no 1 bait for them, infact for most fish. I think meat, casters and sweetcorn are my next most favoured baits. I'm gonna have to try worms for a change as I've not used them proper for over 20yrs and if you think about it on a wild unfished river in particular they should be one of the best baits going.

#12 damper

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 12:48 PM

Same here, we know chub will eat all manner of baits but I find maggots my no 1 bait for them, infact for most fish. I think meat, casters and sweetcorn are my next most favoured baits. I'm gonna have to try worms for a change as I've not used them proper for over 20yrs and if you think about it on a wild unfished river in particular they should be one of the best baits going.

On a local stretch of stream that Vagabond knows well I am having lots of success with crust, legered on a short link just enough to hold bottom but not too much to make it static. The crust will pop up and waver in the current. It's cold so the fish won't move much to find food, youv'e got to find them, especially on small streams. We have had them up to 4.5lbs during the recent cold snap. Also caught brownies on crust intended for the chub !!
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#13 Guest_tigger_*

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 03:42 PM

On a local stretch of stream that Vagabond knows well I am having lots of success with crust, legered on a short link just enough to hold bottom but not too much to make it static. The crust will pop up and waver in the current. It's cold so the fish won't move much to find food, youv'e got to find them, especially on small streams. We have had them up to 4.5lbs during the recent cold snap. Also caught brownies on crust intended for the chub !!




I'm gonna try that technique it sounds like the rolling meat style of fishing, another thing I'm gonna have to try out. I've trotted bread and ledgerd with it only for the odd cast or two but never had any success with it. To be honest unless you can see it on the hook I just don't feel confident using it as you never know if it's still on your hook,even more so in running water. I do know a lot of people have lots of success with it though so I'll have to have a serious go at it.

#14 fishermanlewis

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 06:00 PM

Thanks everyone who has helped me! :) all this information has come in great handy for my future chub fishing. i noticed a few people asking where i will be fishing. i am going to fish the river rother next to the chesterfield canal as i live in chesterfield has anyone else fished it? im thinking of fishing the whole stretch from behind tesco all the way up to behind morissons in stavely. i also heared that the barbel are back in the river as it once used to be the most polluted river in europe, this forced the barbel move to a cleaner stretch. (apparently)

#15 fishermanlewis

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 06:34 PM

What are the best chub baits you have ever come across? and how to fish it for chub?
also best rigs? im stuck for how to get the best results i can when i go fishing for chub.

HELP! :o

Thanks everyone who has helped me! :) all this information has come in great handy for my future chub fishing. i noticed a few people asking where i will be fishing. i am going to fish the river rother next to the chesterfield canal as i live in chesterfield has anyone else fished it? im thinking of fishing the whole stretch from behind tesco all the way up to behind morissons in stavely. i also heared that the barbel are back in the river as it once used to be the most polluted river in europe, this forced the barbel move to a cleaner stretch. (apparently)

#16 Dan G

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 10:25 AM

Bread, bread and more bread... thats my tip... but only in clear water! If the river is coloured, use a worm or luncheon meat (with the meat, the cheaper the better, as it will have a higher fat content, be ground finer in production and consequently stay on the hook better). With the bread, feed a 50p sized lump of mashed up bread every 10 mins or so - seems to always work for me.

As for rigs, keep it very simple - I use a paternoster with SSG split shot, size 8 hook. You can vary the weight easily (by pinching more shot on) dependant on the flow. I like to use the rig to bounce the bait into likely looking spots, next to submerged trees etc

Keep moving, try lots of likely spots, overhangs and pools. Dont get bogged down with loads of equipment as you will definitely catch less fish.

I'm from Sheffield originally, and know the river you're going at, but have never fished it myself... I'm positive the above will work. Let me know how you get on.

#17 Vagabond

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 12:01 PM

To be honest unless you can see it on the hook I just don't feel confident using it as you never know if it's still on your hook,even more so in running water.


Know what you mean - some bread is prone to break-up, but if you ask for a fresh "tin" loaf, and peel off the brown brittle bits, there is a pretty tough spongy layer under that brittle crust.

Traditionally, it is the custom to tear off chunks for hook bait, but that may weaken the structure of the bread. Better to cut pieces out using sharp scissors.

When you have doubts if it still on the hook - wait for a bite! If the doubt becomes unbearable, ease the bait out gently - it is amazing how often it is still there :)


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#18 Guest_tigger_*

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 02:05 PM

Know what you mean - some bread is prone to break-up, but if you ask for a fresh "tin" loaf, and peel off the brown brittle bits, there is a pretty tough spongy layer under that brittle crust.

Traditionally, it is the custom to tear off chunks for hook bait, but that may weaken the structure of the bread. Better to cut pieces out using sharp scissors.

When you have doubts if it still on the hook - wait for a bite! If the doubt becomes unbearable, ease the bait out gently - it is amazing how often it is still there :)




Cheers Dave, I'll try it as soon as poss. As you say cutting the bread should keep it firmer so I'll use that technique. I might have a go at the cheese paste thing as well.

#19 fishermanlewis

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 12:16 AM

Bread, bread and more bread... thats my tip... but only in clear water! If the river is coloured, use a worm or luncheon meat (with the meat, the cheaper the better, as it will have a higher fat content, be ground finer in production and consequently stay on the hook better). With the bread, feed a 50p sized lump of mashed up bread every 10 mins or so - seems to always work for me.

As for rigs, keep it very simple - I use a paternoster with SSG split shot, size 8 hook. You can vary the weight easily (by pinching more shot on) dependant on the flow. I like to use the rig to bounce the bait into likely looking spots, next to submerged trees etc

Keep moving, try lots of likely spots, overhangs and pools. Dont get bogged down with loads of equipment as you will definitely catch less fish.

I'm from Sheffield originally, and know the river you're going at, but have never fished it myself... I'm positive the above will work. Let me know how you get on.

Dan G, im not sure when im fishing it but it will be very soon within the next 2 weeks or even less. i will definatly let you know how i get on and wot tactics and baits worked best as then if you may want to fish it in the future you will know wot i beat the chub on :D
All the best, Lewis. p.s. im also having a crack at the barbel, lol

#20 Worms

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Posted 08 January 2009 - 03:31 PM

Apart from lobworm, minnows (live, liphooked on a size 6) are superb, they can be legered, floatfished or even used in conjunction with a feeder!

Another favourite of mine is babybel cheese, smelly and stays on the hook and keeps forever (still in the wax) if you leave it in your tackle bag! Warning, don't put Babybel in a feeder, big chub will take the feeder instead of the hookbait.

Last year I was fishing the Teme, wandering up and down feeding half a dozen swims. I caught numerous small chub and dace until I visited the last swim (also the first of the day) and lobbed in quarter of a babybel using a small arlesey bomb and let the current roll it past a fallen tree. In 20 minutes I had landed four chub, the smallest 3lb 15oz and the biggest 4lb 8oz. The two blokes fishing the other side from the barbel society about 20yds upstream were a bit miffed as they'd been baitdropping about three cwt of something in the pool at their feet all day (probably buried all the fish!).

Another favourite is maggot and caster, as many as you can squeeze onto a size 6 or 8 hook (don't worry about just nicking them on, just squidge 'em on any old how, the more the merrier), used in conjunction with an open ended feeder with a mix of any bog standard groundbait blocking the ends and maggot and caster filling. Adding a worm to the end of the cocktail on the hook has frequently taken fish when the maggot and caster has failed.

I must admit, either I do something terribly wrong or I'm just unlucky but I have never caught a chub on luncheon meat!!!
Eating wild caught fish is good for my health, reduces food miles and keeps me fit trying to catch them........it's my choice to do it, not yours to stop me!