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float fishing for trout


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#31 Steve Burke

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Posted 28 January 2003 - 04:17 PM

Craig, I'm glad you've had some answers. However I also found the debate about fly and bait fishing very interesting.

I've caught trout on all sorts of methods over the years, both deliberately and when after other species, but unfortunately am not now fit enough to fly fish.

I found that some days bait fishing produced more trout, somedays spinning, some days fly fishing. I enjoyed all the methods and each had its own problems to solve.

Coming from a coarse background I initially found float fishing the easiest, and sometimes I'd deliberately avoid the float to make the fishing harder and more interesting.

I later spent more time fly fishing, which on some waters I found more effective, but because it was new at the time very interesting. I also got extra pleasure from casting a fly but was never able to cast that far decause of disability.

However the method I found the most difficult and most enjoyable was upstream worming on the Wealden streams that Vagabond mentioned. I therefore spent a fair bit of time on this method until I was fairly proficient.

Stealth is the most important requirement, plus you have to be able to read the water, cast accurately and above all control the amount of slack so that you have exactly the right amount to spot the bites yet present the bait naturally. As Vagabond says what you learn from fishing these streams is very useful elsewhere.

I also agree with Peter about all round anglers seldom being snobs. I'd add that I haven't met that many angling snobs who were very good at fishing. Indeed, many of them seemed to use their snobbery to look down on other anglers and thus excuse their own lack of ability!

In the final analaysis though, provided you don't take more than your fair share of fish and don't interfere with the sport of others, does it really matter?
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#32 Vagabond

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Posted 29 January 2003 - 02:27 AM

That is most interesting Steve - I wonder (given your love of lure fishing) whether you went the same route as me, and discovered that an upstream small spinner was as effective as an upstream worm - thus avoiding the chore of worm collecting and saving on re-baiting time! ....and incidentally re-inventing the concept first put forward by Alexander Wanless.

I first used this method before Mepps were readily available, and used small Devon minnows and small Vibro (anyone else remember them?) spinners.

[ 28. January 2003, 08:30 PM: Message edited by: Vagabond ]


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#33 Gillies

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Posted 29 January 2003 - 04:54 PM

I really enjoying up stream worming, its such an exciting way to fish, and their is quite allot of skill involved ... I can't boast at been very skillfull at it though.

I often do it in streams or small rivers for Brown Trout, Salmon and Sea Trout. I find Spring/Summer a good time for doing it for the Brown Trout, and when ever there is a good level of fresh water in the river for the Salmon and Sea Trout, especially at the back end of the season.

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#34 Steve Burke

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 12:31 AM

Vagabond:
That is most interesting Steve - I wonder (given your love of lure fishing) whether you went the same route as me, and discovered that an upstream small spinner was as effective as an upstream worm - thus avoiding the chore of worm collecting and saving on re-baiting time!   ....and incidentally re-inventing the concept  first put forward by Alexander Wanless.

I first used this method before Mepps were readily available, and used small Devon minnows and small Vibro (anyone else remember them?) spinners.

I still preferred the upstream worm mainly because I used to pick up roach to almost 2lbs on them - really big fish from small streams.

I agree with you about Vibros, which I found deadly although not so good in deep water or when long casting was needed. But they were great for stream fishing, and boy, do they put out a thump!
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