Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Help on saltwater fly outfit


  • Please log in to reply
48 replies to this topic

#11 Pugs

Pugs

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 415 posts
  • Location:West Sussex
  • Interests:Fishing, Birds of Prey Conservation, Tanks

Posted 21 July 2004 - 12:38 AM

Thanks guys for your responses...now for the funds

#12 peterthefisherman

peterthefisherman

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 611 posts

Posted 21 July 2004 - 01:48 AM

Norrie did you and Nick catch anything ?? I remain to be convinced that fly fishing in the sea (like fly fishing for pike) is anything other than a sort of fanciful diversion costing much but not as satisfying (or as successful) as using ultra light tactics eg. for mullet etc.
There is a culture surrounding fly fishing that suggests it is the only really skillful practice, having spent time on the Clyde I am of the opinion that fishing natural baits well is better/harder often but more rewarding.
A bad days fishing is better than a good day at the office. Tight lines all.

#13 Guest_NickInTheNorth_*

Guest_NickInTheNorth_*
  • Guests

Posted 21 July 2004 - 02:32 AM

Hi Peter

No caught nothing. However I had one wee tug and missed. I agree with you, fly fishing in the sea is in many cases less succesful than other methods. As to being costing much, not so; the short session we had cost nothing, I was simply utilising fly fishing gear that I already own.

The comparison with fly fishing for pike however I find very interesting. In 3 years of fly fishing for pike, almost all on the Leeds Liverpool canal in West Yorkshire I caught well over a 1000 pike, the best weighed 13lbs 5oz. In addition I caught many good perch to a best weight of 2lb 13oz.

I certainly would not make any claims for it being the only skillfull practise. All I would say is that it can be a very effective method of fishing, cheap to follow, and very satisfying.

The real skill of fly fishing, as with all methods is understanding the water and the fish. What is generally know as watercraft. Get that right and you can catch any fish willing to feed (or have a go) that is in the vicinity of your hook.

#14 peterthefisherman

peterthefisherman

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 611 posts

Posted 21 July 2004 - 10:43 PM

I stand well corrected on the pike side of things!!, well done indeed. Will speak to you later for some tips and will give it a try on the canal. Hope we can get Amble organised and you can make it. I am waiting for the skipper to call me back re availabilty. You have unfinished business with a good cod havent you ??
A bad days fishing is better than a good day at the office. Tight lines all.

#15 argyll

argyll

    Member

  • Anglers' Net Contributor
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,903 posts
  • Location:South London
  • Interests:Fishing!

Posted 22 July 2004 - 01:09 AM

Theres no 'culture' surrounding fly fishing, its a perception by those that dont flyfish.
As Nickinthenorth suggests, flyfishing for pike can be very rewarding. Biggest I know of was a 42lb plus trout reservoir fish. Neither does it necessarily cost much. It is perhaps the most stripped down form of angling there is. Rods can be bought for little money, reels for a pittance, the rest can be made for pennies. The same thing pretty much goes for saltwater flyfishing too in the UK.
I should point out that several changes of Barbour clothing, plus fours, a Harrods hamper and a solid silver hip flask are entirely optional and have no bearing on the size and number of fish caught

[ 21. July 2004, 09:57 PM: Message edited by: argyll ]
'I've got a mind like a steel wassitsname'

#16 Dick Dastardly

Dick Dastardly

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,060 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ashford,Kent
  • Interests:Fishing,Photography,Internet

Posted 22 July 2004 - 10:03 AM

Dont normally post on this section but this thread caught my eye. The tackle reccomended so far is fine.Normal "Reservoir" tackle does the job.For salt water use in this country there is no need for specialist salt water fly lines.These merely have a different plastisiser in them to stop them becomming "soft" in tropical heat.Well worth while if you are going to warmer climates though as I found out the hard way! I wouldnt worry about "imatitive" patterns like crabs /grubs for Mullet I have found that small streamer type lures are readily taken,especially by thin lips.Obviously all your gear needs a thorough washing in freshwater asd soon as you get home.Its great fun,good luck.
And thats my "non indicative opinion"!

#17 malevans

malevans

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 413 posts
  • Interests:Carp, Pike, Salmon and Trout, bit of shore fishing when on hols

Posted 24 July 2004 - 04:26 PM

Hi all,
very interesting thread. Saltwater fly fishing does seem to be growing here in the UK, with several people offering them selves as guides. Its an activity, like shorefishing in general, which is a holiday activity only for me. But basic tactics of pulling smallish flies back through weed works. One constraint I perceive in common with normal shore fishing, though reality may be different, is that the best marks require one to be something of a mountain goat. Given my problem with heights means my wife gets stuff in and out of loft as the step ladders are way too high for me, seems to be limiting. Pike flyfishing is good fun also and productive with plenty of fish upto 9.5lb, although nudging through the Dble barrier is proving hard for me.

However I have no elusions Pike and saltwater fly fishing has more in common with spinning than it does with normal river trouting. But it makes a pleasant change.

My saltwater rods and pike rods are common. A 9ft #8 and 9ft #10.

I will confess to having some crab patterns for saltwater, they were so cute......far too pretty to let a fish munch on them. Mind you they are going to get wet in Crete. :D For highland loch pike the old mouse complete with little ears and a tail :rolleyes: seems to do the trick. Down here I find big green and yellow tinsel things seem best.
Size 6 and 8 Muddler minnows have worked for me when pike are fry feeding, have tried these in the salt but without success thus far.

#18 malevans

malevans

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 413 posts
  • Interests:Carp, Pike, Salmon and Trout, bit of shore fishing when on hols

Posted 24 July 2004 - 04:26 PM

illusions even !

#19 Snatcher

Snatcher

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,909 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Whitley Bay,Northumberland
  • Interests:Angling,Shooting,Drinking,Darts,Tying fishing flies/lures,Weigh training,following NUFC football club,more drinking

Posted 26 July 2004 - 01:51 AM

http://www.fishingmegastore.com
http://www.sportfish.co.uk
And welcolm to the forum
By the way I am the pisspot!


Fishing digs on the Mull of Galloway - recommend
HERE

babyforavatar.jpg

Me when I had hair


Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy

#20 guernseybass

guernseybass

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 216 posts

Posted 26 July 2004 - 03:12 AM

Pugs, - the advice given so far re tackle is pretty sound. any old rod will do, as will any floater of 7 or above or an intermediate line. these should be weight forward. sandeel patterns are easy to tye just some bucktail and flash on a mustad 34007 saltwater hook. very few bass are caught on crab patterns. as well as the UKSWFF site check out www.oceanflies.com for fly Selections. for advice on casting checkout www.sexyloops.com .

as to mullet - they are almost impossible to catch sometimes. you are much more likely to catch bass, mackerel and pollack.

I would completely ignore Malcolm & peterthefish as they have given you very bad advice ( although probably well meant) for the following reasons -

1. how is SWFF NOT like river trouting then ? you cast out an imitation of the fish's main diet into the current, let it fish down and round, mending the line , let it hang then retrieve or pick it up and cast again, moving along the bank a pace each time. it IS just like river trouting, the sea has currents and structure which create eddys, rips and seams which concentrates food ie baitfish and shrimps, crustaceans for the fish. find the food find the fish.

it has very little in common with spinning if you do it properly, as decribed above, treat the sea like a river and you'll suceed very quickly.

2. the best marks are not necessarily the rocks, more likely to be your flat shallow beaches. look for channels, sand bars and rips at first light, or even dusk. be mobile, watch the sea birds and if you don't have any luck change your fly.

3. peter & nick says they're unconvinced of the efficacy of SWFF - well like any other type of FF you have to learn first. Nick to his great credit, actually makes a brilliant point - "The real skill of fly fishing, as with all methods is understanding the water and the fish. What is generally known as watercraft. Get that right and you can catch any fish willing to feed (or have a go) that is in the vicinity of your hook." thats it in a nutshell, you wouldn't expect to catch salmon or trout on your first trip would you chaps ?

to underline my point, here are two pictures of bass caught in Guernsey, & Dorset ( when there was 25 of us out - everyone caught fish) this year. both caught in rips on flat sandy beaches at first light

guernsey, 6 pounder :

Posted Image

dorset 4 3/4 pounder :
Posted Image

finally, if you're targeting bass please join BASS (ukbass.com)and C&R, especially any fish over 5lb - they will be at least 11 years old and very likely female.

tightlines to you all.

Mark

[ 25. July 2004, 10:14 PM: Message edited by: guernseybass ]
www.swff.co.uk - Guernsey Saltwater Fly Fishing

Member of B.A.S.S. - www.ukbass.com

Member of NFSA www.nfsa.org.uk

"better to have fished and lost than never fished at all "