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#21 Guest_Flybynight_*

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Posted 10 June 2005 - 10:12 PM

quote:


but you fly fishermen who think that YOUR sport is the ONLY real angling and ANY other method is somehow 'inferior' really get up my neb.

Not all fly fishermen think that... though it is pretty special :D

FBN

#22 franticfisherman2

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Posted 12 June 2005 - 06:11 PM

I will use any method that is legally allowed that I think gives me the best chance of catching what I am after. If I am after ferox I will usually troll a deadbait - it makes sense :)

To see my videos,  look HERE - Enjoy.......FF2


#23 Sandison

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Posted 13 June 2005 - 12:40 AM

RE: ferox

The old Scottish method of fishing for ferox was 'trolling', with dead bait.

Sometimes, in the autumn, or in the early months of the season, they might take a fly. Loch Rannoch is one such location, and Loch Veyatie in Wester Ross.

Ron Greer's book 'Ferox Trout and Arctic Char' is, in my view, perhaps the best guide?

Ferox are unique, in that they have survived genetically intact in northern waters throughout the world, since the end of the last Ice Age.

#24 Sportsman

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Posted 13 June 2005 - 01:23 AM

That would be Ron Greer of "underwater mink" fame

Let's agree to respect each others views, no matter how wrong yours may be.

 

 

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#25 corydoras

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Posted 13 June 2005 - 08:16 PM

franticfisherman2:
I will use any method that is legally allowed that I think gives me the best chance of catching what I am after. If I am after ferox I will usually troll a deadbait - it makes sense :)

It certainly makes a hell of a lot more sense than flogging away with a fly for one. I don't think ferox trout eat many flies anyway. Of course I could be totally wrong. Happens frequently :D

The problem isn't what people don't know, it's what they know that just ain't so.
Vaut mieux ne rien dire et passer pour un con que de parler et prouver que t'en est un!
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#26 corydoras

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Posted 13 June 2005 - 08:22 PM

Sandison:
RE: ferox

The old Scottish method of fishing for ferox was 'trolling', with dead bait.

Sometimes, in the autumn, or in the early months of the season, they might take a fly. Loch Rannoch is one such location, and Loch Veyatie in Wester Ross.

Ron Greer's book 'Ferox Trout and Arctic Char' is, in my view, perhaps the best guide?

Ferox are unique, in that they have survived genetically intact in northern waters throughout the world, since the end of the last Ice Age.

What makes you thing that ferox are genetically anyting other than Salmo trutta fario, the common or garden brown trout?

The problem isn't what people don't know, it's what they know that just ain't so.
Vaut mieux ne rien dire et passer pour un con que de parler et prouver que t'en est un!
Mi, ch’fais toudis à m’mote


#27 Sandison

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Posted 13 June 2005 - 11:50 PM

Corydoras

Yup, right, there is still debate over this issue. But in the same way that each salmon population is genetically distinct, I believe that this also applies to ferox trout.

Yes, ferox are a sub-species of Salmo trutta, but, genetically, each population is distinct in its own right?

"Research into the genetics of ferox trout, has shown them to be genetically distinct from other trout in some lochs (for example Lough Melvin, Ireland), but recent unpublished research from a variety of Scottish lochs has shown that this is not the case in all populations. Data from Loch Rannoch samples, for example, have shown that a wide genetic variability exists within its ferox population."

Extracted from a report published by the Scottish Executive Fisheries Research Services freshwater lab at Pitlochry

#28 franticfisherman2

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Posted 14 June 2005 - 02:26 AM

I don't mind what they are as long as they're BIG and they'll take take my bait! :D

To see my videos,  look HERE - Enjoy.......FF2


#29 corydoras

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Posted 14 June 2005 - 05:29 PM

Sandison:
Corydoras

Yes, ferox are a sub-species of Salmo trutta, but, genetically, each population is distinct in its own right?

That is the bit I am not sure I agree with. If ferox are a sub-species that would imply that ferox only breed with other ferox trout, and that we would see juvenile ferox trout.

[ 14. June 2005, 12:58 PM: Message edited by: corydoras ]

The problem isn't what people don't know, it's what they know that just ain't so.
Vaut mieux ne rien dire et passer pour un con que de parler et prouver que t'en est un!
Mi, ch’fais toudis à m’mote


#30 Sandison

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Posted 15 June 2005 - 12:59 AM

Corydoras

I'm not sure either, I suppose, but I have tried to find out, by exploring and reading available literature and reports on the subject.

Have you contacted any fisheries scientists and put your question re juvenile ferox trout to them?

Bruce