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carp in snags


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#1 murphy

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 08:55 PM

i was fishin silver springs the other day and i noticed some large carp feeding by some tall reed in very shallow water (tails in the air 3 or 4) so i went to a suitable spot to cast and cast a goo 20 metres to where the fish were with 15lb hooklength and a method with meat but time after time the fish would bump itself, bend my hook or snap my line i must have lost 12 fish in all and i had more bad luck when i finally got one away from the reeds i had it all the way in and close enough to see it was a mid-doulbles grass carp when he ran and snapped my line as i had the cluch tight so i could land it so any one got any tips on how to get these fish away from the snags every time

cheers murphy

#2 mpbdsnu

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 09:41 PM

Hello Murphy. I would be interested to hear what you mainline BS was? If you say you had 15lb BS Hooklength!

#3 fantasticfisherman

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 11:07 PM

first of all don't tighten up the drag when the fish is close in simply because of the scenario you had. if anything you should loosen it more so the fish can take line if it lunges when it sees the net.

#4 Dick Dastardly

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 03:30 AM

What TC rod was you using as well? Shouldnt be able to break 15lb line with a rod full stop.What make was the line and how old?
And thats my "non indicative opinion"!

#5 Common 40

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 02:07 PM

alot of people also don't allow the rod to do the work close in ie. pointing it skyward, I have seen certain people pointing the rod allmost directly at the fish in a panic situation, (A good way to turn a fish away from snags and weed etc. is to hold the rod low to the water in the opposite direction it is running and have your clutch set accurately unless you use the backwind) that's not to say you were doing that murphy, but the mind boggles sometimes to see certain techniques when panicking at the sight of a decent size fish close to the net, as budgie says if your losing fish due to snap lines and hook bends, You should take a serious look at your total set up m8

[ 15. July 2005, 09:13 AM: Message edited by: Common 40 ]

#6 Gaffer

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Posted 15 July 2005 - 02:33 PM

A stiff actioned 3 1/2 lb test curve rod will only exert somewhere around 6 1/2 lb of linear strain on the line, tops, when at full test curve (bent, with the tip at 90 degrees to the butt). So, if you're breaking line heavier than 8lbs through linear strain, using a rod, then I would guess that either your mainline is at fault (old, damaged, cheap'n'nasty, etc) or that your knots aren't holding up.

Damaged can be caused to line up to 2 inches away from a knot if the knot/line isn't lubricated with siliva, especially when tying something like a 'grinner' knot where the knot slides and tightens.

If you are snag fishing you want a beefy rod and line to be able to 'bully' the fish away from the snags and into open water where pressure can be relaxed and the fish can then be 'played' on a normal clutch. Personally I always have the clutch set 'easy' and use my forefinger on the side of the spool. Alternatively, if you watch Matt Hayes, he sets the clutch quite tight, but back-winds, which is another option.

When snag fishing you really need to be fishing with very little slack line between you and your hookbait, and have your hand on the rod at all times. If you want a 'sarney' or a 'cuppa', then wind in and have a breather.

And Murphy, I mean this in the nicest way, mate, but when you've lost a couple of fish, that's the time to anylise your set up (check line, knots, hooks, etc) rather than when you've lost 12 fish.

[ 15. July 2005, 09:38 AM: Message edited by: Gaffer ]

#7 murphy

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Posted 16 July 2005 - 11:56 PM

cheers to every one whom has replied and i am goig to have a look at my set up and consider changing it. i am very grateful for your advise as i am new to carping and also relativly new to fishing

cheers again murphy

#8 Gaffer

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Posted 17 July 2005 - 12:32 AM

Murphy, the fact that you hooked 12 fish suggests that you've got the difficult bit - the catching - sorted!
I'm sure it's just a case of going through all your set up to make sure it's up for the job.

I went through the same when I first started to fish for carp around 14 years ago, luckily for me a competant (and nice) carp angler in an adjoining swim came over to help. We did a deal, he'd go through my set up and I'd tell him what rigs and bait I was using as he hadn't had a sniff all day.
The problem with my gear was my knots, or to be more accurate, the lack of lubrication on tightening up on my mainline/hooklink swivel knot and the knot I was using! All those years match fishing never put the strain on my gear like carp ever could.

Since then I've only used two knots for my hooklinks and mainline (apart from leadcore), the Palomar and the Knotless-knot.

Keep us posted with your progress.

#9 Butcherboy

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Posted 17 July 2005 - 12:44 AM

Tighten drag right up, use beefy tackle and sit on rods.
When you get a run hit it and walk backwards if space allows. Then off with anti reverse switch and play with backwind if needed.
Works for me.

#10 Dick Dastardly

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Posted 17 July 2005 - 05:06 AM

Butcherboy:
Tighten drag right up, use beefy tackle and sit on rods.
When you get a run hit it and walk backwards if space allows. Then off with anti reverse switch and play with backwind if needed.
Works for me.

Agree with every thing but the "beef tackle" shouldnt refer to rods these must be relatively light and soft.
And thats my "non indicative opinion"!