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carp in snags


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#21 Gaffer

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 03:46 PM

Newt:
As to the comments about it being unlikely that a rod could exert enough pressure to break even a fairly light b/s line (like the 8 lb that gaffer mentioned), I agree. However, if you fish in rough areas, line damage can weaken the line so you may have to go a good bit heavier. Conditions again.

Very true!

I use 50lb PowerPro for nearly all of my static fishing. I often get comments about using 'unsporting tow-rope', which I'll come onto in a minute, but my phylosophy is this; the next safest place for a carp after I've struck is on my unhooking mat!

As for 'unsporting tow-rope'; as I've said, it's nearly impossible to exert anymore than 6-8lbs of linear strain on a mainline with even the beefiest carp rod, therefore, it's no less sporting to use 50lb mainline (braid) than it is to use 8lb mainline, if you see where I'm coming from.

For snag fishing I'll use my very 'tippy' 3 1/4lb tc rods with 50lb PowerPro, which in my mind is 'beefy'. There's enough backbone to the rods to bully/heave the most powerfullest of carp away from danger (underwater branches, reeds, etc), yet 'tippy' enough to cushion any lunges at the net.

So, in my opinion, beefy is best for snag fishing, within reason.

Like I keep saying, carp fishing is about the angler conducting a 'risk assessment' before they even wet a line, and when they do, they have to take full responsibility for every and any eventuality.

[ 19. July 2005, 10:49 AM: Message edited by: Gaffer ]

#22 Severn Wolf

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 04:13 PM

quote:


Like I keep saying, carp fishing is about the angler conducting a 'risk assessment' before they even wet a line, and when they do, they have to take full responsibility for every and any eventuality.

Wise words indeed and well said!

I bumped into a group of the very elusive carp on my local mere the other day. Four fish, two twenty five plussers, we`re sitting on the very edge of a fallen tree. I managed to get one of them to move out and take a floater every now and again but my gut feeling was that if I would have hooked one the chances of landing it were slim. Even though it would have been a momentous moment if I had landed one (these fish rarely come out), I couldn`t bring myself to play with the odds stacked against me and walked away.

[ 19. July 2005, 11:14 AM: Message edited by: Severn Wolf ]

#23 Butcherboy

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 04:48 PM

The problem is some people, for whatever reason, do not have this attitude and will fish on regardless.

#24 Severn Wolf

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 05:21 PM

Thats why fisheries have to rope off snag areas eh!!!! Its a shame that the welfare of the fish is not put before hooking it.

#25 Common 40

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 08:29 PM

a very good example is C lake at the waveney valley complex norfolk...There are some beautiful fish to 36 lb in there and the owners removed all the dangerous bankside snags last year.

fair play to them

#26 poledark

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 03:31 AM

Hey, no problem Butcherboy, never even considered that you were being insulting,

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#27 Common 40

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 06:20 AM

[ 22. July 2005, 01:20 PM: Message edited by: Common 40 ]

#28 Gaffer

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 12:08 PM

Kev, you've got a PM, mate.

#29 mpbdsnu

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 12:15 PM

You have to realise mate that other people have opinions too!

There is also many years collective experience on this site, but if someone comes on with the attitude that what I say is right and nobody else possibly can be, then one or two may challenge such apparent claims!

Not accusing mate, but if words aren't chosen carefully then it is how someone can come across!

[ 20. July 2005, 12:38 PM: Message edited by: mpbdsnu ]

#30 Dick Dastardly

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Posted 29 July 2005 - 02:37 AM

Some differing opinions here.You often get this in angling.Often people arnt basing their opinions on actual experience but others (as is certainly the case here) they certainly are.I think we get these seemingly opposing situations due to the very individual nature of various waters and the way we each use our tackle or indeed our own interpretation of common angling terms.

For what its worth my "snag fishing" set up has always been a three quarter action 1 3/4lb TC rod with a 15lb Maxima nono,large (4-2) thick wired hook and as simple a rig as possible dependent on presentation requirements.All of this has been done at a distance of less than 15 yards.

I usually use two rods maximum (more often than not one and always one if fishing the surface)for snag fishing to give me more control and also avoid tangles.I never sleep and sit right on the rod,in fact holding it if only one is used.Any indicator (if used) is kept on a tight line.All this is to ensure instant control and minimum of line available for the fish to take.

When I get a take I give no line at all merely allowing the "unbalanced" combination of soft rod and heavy line to take the strain.Any lunges are absorbed by the rod bending (I hold this at an angle of just over 45%)as the fish isnt allowed to build up any speed by running it doesnt break the line.Continual use of various angles of side strain keep the fish off balance.The walking back technique helps IMO as when you lower the rod to pump you are allowing the fish line which can be a great problem when extremely close to the snags.Walking back also seems to draw fish towards you smoother,keeping its head in the direction you want it ie towards you.Look at when you net large hard fighting fish such as cats and salmon for instance.

I have had over 50 20+ fish this way but never a thirty so cant speak of these.Only loses Ive had are through hook pulls.I dont think the hook has "ripped out" in these (less than half dozen)cases as Ive never seen evidence of damage on the fish Ive landed.I put it down more to poor hook holds in the first place.That said however I do tend to not fish an area again this style if it happens more than once.

As said earlier I prefer thick wired hooks as not only are these (in general) stronger but also dont apear to cut the flesh as easily.I also stick to barbed hooks for this.

100% agree that some areas should simpley not be fished.

Ive never had to fish at long range tight up to heavy snags but would doubt that this aproch would work in that situation.
And thats my "non indicative opinion"!