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Putting Together Some Tying Tools


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#11 Steve Walker

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 11:45 AM

Thanks Dave - I wonder if my old university still sells dissecting kits for undergraduate ? When new, those tools were excellent, and came in a nice cloth roll. I'm not sure where mine is now, but the scissors had lost a little of their sharpness.

I suppose undergraduates probably don't dissect anything these days.

#12 Steve Walker

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 01:15 PM

If they are anything like the ones I had in my kit, this might be a good source for small sharp scissors:

http://www.mortonmed...ments~p~678.htm

Or possibly here:

http://www.coleparme...x.asp?cls=48212

Surgical grade ones are a bit scarily priced, but the dissecting grade ones aren't.

#13 Worms

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 01:30 PM

If they are anything like the ones I had in my kit, this might be a good source for small sharp scissors:

http://www.mortonmed...ments~p~678.htm

Or possibly here:

http://www.coleparme...x.asp?cls=48212

Surgical grade ones are a bit scarily priced, but the dissecting grade ones aren't.

I use all of my dissecting kit scissors for fishing purposes. A quick wipe with a decent stone soon restores the cutting edge. Unfortunately I can't remember where I got all of mine from. I bought the basic roll from Aber but I added to it over the years.

For what it's worth the best 'quick' sharpening "stone" is, in my opinion, a combined diamond/ceramic Fallkniven DC4!
Eating wild caught fish is good for my health, reduces food miles and keeps me fit trying to catch them........it's my choice to do it, not yours to stop me!

#14 Steve Walker

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 02:39 PM

I use all of my dissecting kit scissors for fishing purposes.


Having located my kit, it would seem that so did I - the scissors aren't in it!

Edited by Steve Walker, 08 January 2010 - 02:40 PM.


#15 Steve Walker

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 08:42 PM

Well, had a drive out to Reading this afternoon, found Sportfish and explained what I was looking for, and they couldn't have been more helpful. Absolutely loads of stuff, too, I'll definitely go there to stock up in the springtime. Good advice to go there, thanks! :thumbs:

Came away with a vice, selection of tools and materials and a handy book of techniques and patterns. We then nipped into HobbyCraft on the way home and picked up some other stuff that might be useful - cheaper scissors, 7mm glue gun and coloured (and sparkly!) sticks, some interesting looking pearlescent and metallic threads, some little metal beads, a plastic box with compartments which will do until I can find something more attractive, etc.

Having had a go, I think I will have to get a better lamp and a magnifier. This (nameless monstrosity) is my first fly, really just an attempt to try out some techniques. I'm pretty sure the daft little brownies in my favourite stream will not critique my technique too harshly, come the springtime :)

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#16 Worms

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 08:46 PM

Well done Steve, for a first fly that's great. :thumbs:
Eating wild caught fish is good for my health, reduces food miles and keeps me fit trying to catch them........it's my choice to do it, not yours to stop me!

#17 Steve Walker

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 08:52 PM

Cheers, I am quite pleased with it! First one to come off the vice finished, mind, the very first attempt ended in a whip finish tool disaster and had to be redone from scratch. There's a youtube video of how to use a whip finish tool which I have discovered is worth an infinite number of pages of instructions.

#18 chuby

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 09:39 PM

Looks good to me,that will catch B)
Scruffy is good,that is what i was told when i first started tying.
If you ever tie up anything with bead chain eyes,look in B and Q,loads in there,brass,red,blue,large and small B)
Look for Sally Hansons 'hard as nails' for varnishing heads,or even just clear nail varnish B) .You have already discovered Hobby craft i see:lol:

This may be of some interest for patterns
http://www.diptera.co.uk/

Edited by chuby, 09 January 2010 - 09:43 PM.


#19 Steve Walker

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 01:38 AM

Hmm... These were easier - but a bit wonky. I'll have to try them on the trout.


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#20 Toady

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 06:37 PM

I'm sure the trout will love 'em.

Looks like you're a natural to me.

Try leaving a bit more space at the head end, it can make finishing the fly neater. The proportions of the " Nameless Monstrosity" dry fly were good too. The hackle and tail maybe just a tad long.

Those little brownies had better watch out next season.
Sleeping we image what awake we wish;
Dogs dream of bones, and fishermen of fish.