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#21 Steve Walker

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 11:46 AM

Which leads me to another question, is it better to fish identical buzzers, or two different ones to see which the trout prefer?


Don't know what the fly fishing expert opinion is, but to me it's the same tactic with any multi-hook rig - first use it to find the best bait, then use it to give you more of the best bait in the water. If you were beach fishing with a three hook flapper, you might start off with rag, crab and mackerel, but if rag was the only bait taking fish, it would soon be rag, rag and rag! So I would tend to start with different ones until a preference becomes clear and then use the same. The complicating factor is that they are fished at different depths, and it seems to me that is often more important than the pattern.

#22 Tony U

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 12:15 PM

Thanks for your replies guys.

There's some interesting things to think about and to try there.

I've ordered some of the Grauval line (9lbs, I was going to go higher as well, but I will wait and see what I think of it first).

And I've got a whole box of boobies (part of an ebay purchase) to decorate the trees around the lakes I fish, and the grass behind me :)

So, I'm thinking of starting with a booby on the point and a couple of buzzers on droppers.

Which leads me to another question, is it better to fish identical buzzers, or two different ones to see which the trout prefer?


Leon
The method you describe is known a the washing line, and should be used with a floating/midge tip or intermediate line when the fish are up un the water; not the best thing in cold winter condiations but you never know, a prolonged mild spell will bring the fish up as there will be sparse midge hatches.
I would go along with most of what Steve says but different patterns can do differing things for example you could fish a lure or a flashy wet on the point to act as an attractor to your buzzers or you could fish an emerger patern on the top dropper and fish this on or just under the surface. If I am fishing a team of buzzers I tend to fish a heavy superglue or epoxy buzzer or bloodworm pattern on the point, a realistic pattern on the middle dropper and an emerging or skinny buzzer on the top dropper and change colours to find out what the fish want. It is also worth remembering that if takes dry up a change of colour rather than a change of pattern may also be succesful.
When do you fancy a trip out then??
Tony

After a certain age, if you don't wake up aching in every joint, you are probably dead.


#23 Steve Walker

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 01:23 PM

That's a good point, and I also tend to have the heaviest fly on the point, largely for the minimisation of casting disasters!

#24 Sportsman

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 04:58 PM

Sorry, but I really don't understand why you need such heavy leaders, particularly when fishing small flies like buzzers.
As in most thing angling tackle has to be balanced so I suppose if you are using a 7/8wt broomstick to catch 2lb stockies then you will need heavy leaders to cope with the lack of "give" in the rod.
Heavy leaders and small flies equals p*ss poor presentation and a lack of takes.
I seldom use a leader heavier than 4lb but then I seldom use a rod heavier than a 4wt or a fly bigger than a size 14.
Does it work? well, my PB trout on a 7' 6" 4wt rod, 4lb Fluorocarbon leader and size 16 fly was in excess of 17lb.
The fishery owner estimated nearer to 20lb. It was one of 3 double figure fish I caught that afternoon on the same tackle. They were all played and landed quickly and went back to swim away strongly.
Try light tackle for fly fishing. More fun and more effective :thumbs:

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#25 chuby

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 08:01 PM

Thanks for your replies guys.

There's some interesting things to think about and to try there.

I've ordered some of the Grauval line (9lbs, I was going to go higher as well, but I will wait and see what I think of it first).

And I've got a whole box of boobies (part of an ebay purchase) to decorate the trees around the lakes I fish, and the grass behind me :)

So, I'm thinking of starting with a booby on the point and a couple of buzzers on droppers.

Which leads me to another question, is it better to fish identical buzzers, or two different ones to see which the trout prefer?


Thats heavy line for buzzers me thinks,ok for pulling lures though.
Already been answered i know but the method is as stated,the washing line and again as stated its really more for the warmer months.Thats not to say buzzers won't work now because they will but just deeper.
Fish three, heaviest on the point and lightest/smallest on top dropper,or try a dawl bach for instance on the top dropper.
If you want to try an indicator,fine.Don't let people put you off with-oh thats not fly fishing.Its no different from using buzzers or whatever under a bushy dry fly or indeed the washing line method.It works,makes it easy to fish the flies at the correct depth and will help to sight those very very slight takes that you might otherwise miss,use it as required rather than the rule.
I'm not the greatest caster in the world and quite often restrict myself to one dropper only as they can be a nightmare at times.Also its worth noting that quite a few fisheries will not allow the use of droppers,can't really understand why but rules are rules i guess.

Edited by chuby, 12 January 2011 - 08:04 PM.


#26 Worms

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 08:14 PM

Try light tackle for fly fishing. More fun and more effective :thumbs:

In total agreement here, match the fly and leader to the rod/line. Don't forget, a lighter line is narrower in diameter and so potentially will cast further (with a decent rod and technique). This is particularly noticeable when casting into the wind. Drop your 7wt rod and pick up a 4-5wt and have some fun.....I use 2-4 on most rivers and rarely use above a 4-5 in freshwater!

p.s. Don't think I've ever used over 4lb tippet in freshwater in my life, usually 1 1/2-2lb!

Edited by Worms, 12 January 2011 - 08:16 PM.

Eating wild caught fish is good for my health, reduces food miles and keeps me fit trying to catch them........it's my choice to do it, not yours to stop me!

#27 Steve Walker

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 09:08 PM

I'm trying to remember what the mandatory minimum tippet strength is at Farmoor - 6lb, I think. Some big, hard fighting rainbows in there, though I think none as big as Sportsman's pb. I'm just wondering what strength line I would choose for 5-10lb barbel or carp.

#28 Worms

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 09:24 PM

I'm trying to remember what the mandatory minimum tippet strength is at Farmoor - 6lb, I think. Some big, hard fighting rainbows in there, though I think none as big as Sportsman's pb. I'm just wondering what strength line I would choose for 5-10lb barbel or carp.

Hmmm, mandatory tippet strengths? Never come across that. As Sportsman was saying, the balance is in the tackle. I suppose if more commercial fisheries get influxes of...shall we say...less experienced anglers out on a jolly, punching out dog-nobblers (probably showing how recently it was that I fished a commercial!) then yes, larger set-ups would be required and hoped for.

I fish mainly rivers for trout and grayling and the average fish is probably below 1 1/4lb. Having said that I've had much bigger fish on 3-4wt rods and light tippets and I generally use my heavier river tackle (usually because it's longer) when fishing stilwaters. Using a 10lb tippet though and I'd be reaching for my 10-12wt rod. Personal opinion but I tend to use the line/rod weight as a guide for a maximum tippet weight in lbs!....usually lower. Just calculate the lifting force and drag that a given weight rod and reel combination can lift!.....9lb on a 6-7wt rod???
Eating wild caught fish is good for my health, reduces food miles and keeps me fit trying to catch them........it's my choice to do it, not yours to stop me!

#29 chuby

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 10:09 PM

I'm trying to remember what the mandatory minimum tippet strength is at Farmoor - 6lb, I think. Some big, hard fighting rainbows in there, though I think none as big as Sportsman's pb. I'm just wondering what strength line I would choose for 5-10lb barbel or carp.

A few waters insist on minimum B/S.
Duncton Mill insist on 6lb minimum B/S.
I have had fish to 12-13 from there on 6lb and not had a problem.There again i have fished Halliford Mere in Shepperton and had the occasional smash take on buzzers and been broken!!!!!!!!!!!! as have others and the fish don't have to be THAT big to do it.
I really think that tethering buzzers to line of 8/10lb,unless its ultra low diameter is going to seriously affect the interest rate as they have too much time to inspect the flies.
Guess you have to weigh up possible size of fish expected,method used etc.

#30 Steve Walker

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 10:14 PM

Yes, I usually use 1.5 to 2lb tippets for river brownies. I think the tippet strength limit on Farmoor is only on the catch and release fishery - I guess they subscribe to the school of thought that fish to be released should be skulldragged in on heavy tackle to minimise lactate build-up. When I found myself armed only with my #3/4 weight, I found they came in quicker than on the heavier gear, but if you watch a competitive angler like Hywel whatsisname, they get fish netted very quickly through the expedient of dragging them into the net before they know what's going on.