Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Black slugs


  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#1 kentar

kentar

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 34 posts
  • Interests:angling

Posted 01 May 2004 - 02:09 PM

Has anyone tried preserving these chub delights?
Tried freezing once,but didn`t work out too well.
Any suggestions?

#2 John Bogle

John Bogle

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 30 posts
  • Interests:Fishing funnily enough! Also wildlife, photography, travel (to go fishing!)

Posted 01 May 2004 - 02:13 PM

Hm... that's an interesting one. I'd imagine keeping them live like worms would be the best bet? Perhaps build a sluggery?! :)

#3 thornabyangler

thornabyangler

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 119 posts
  • Interests:fishing , trials mtb

Posted 01 May 2004 - 03:08 PM

get a plastic box 2ft by 2ft ish a few cabbages and some compost and ur set.They live for weeks,and they get as fat as hell.Keep the lid on though ,with air holes punched thru.

#4 The Diamond Geezer

The Diamond Geezer

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,098 posts
  • Interests:Banging-up bandits & fishing, in that order

Posted 01 May 2004 - 04:10 PM

But lettuce is what they really love!

DG

#5 John S

John S

    Moderator

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,117 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yorkshire - God's Own County!
  • Interests:Eating cage birds and missing out commas.

Posted 01 May 2004 - 04:59 PM

They love peppers (the large ones), especially when I'm growing some in the greenhouse :mad:

John S

ηβπ

Species caught in 2013: Beech, Elder, Hawthorn, Oak, Right Earlobe, Scots Pine.

 

Species caught in 2012: Ash, Aspen, Beech, Big Nasty Stinging Nettle, Birch, Copper Beech, Grey Willow, Holly, Hazel, Oak, Wasp Nest (that was a really bad day), White Poplar.

Species caught in 2011: Black Thorn, Crab Apple, Elder, Fir, Hawthorn, Horse Chestnut, Oak, Passing Dog, Rowan, Sycamore, Willow.

Species caught in 2010: Ash, Beech, Birch, Elder, Elm, Gorse, Mullberry, Oak, Poplar, Rowan, Sloe, Willow, Yew.



Eyes4sml.jpg


#6 chuby

chuby

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 747 posts
  • Location:Surrey
  • Interests:FISHING,TRAVEL

Posted 01 May 2004 - 05:47 PM

D.G.,they love my B****y bedding plants more :( ,so there you go Kentar,keep em alive,and feed em a diet of lettuce,peppers and bedding plants :D ,chuby

#7 The Diamond Geezer

The Diamond Geezer

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,098 posts
  • Interests:Banging-up bandits & fishing, in that order

Posted 01 May 2004 - 06:21 PM

Fortunately chub love slugs even more than slugs like ... well, all most everything :D

DG

#8 Newt

Newt

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 27,681 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Edgemoor, South Carolina, USA
  • Interests:fishing, duplicate bridge, fishing, RV (caravan) travel to where there is fishing

Posted 01 May 2004 - 10:07 PM

How well do they hold up when hooked? (slugs that is, not chub)
" My choices in life were either to be a piano player in a whore house or a politician. And to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference!" - Harry Truman, 33rd US President

#9 Guest_sslatter_*

Guest_sslatter_*
  • Guests

Posted 01 May 2004 - 10:09 PM

In the garden at my old flat, a neighbour's dog used to come in at nighttime and do his business..

The early morning sight of a slug-covered canine stool used to greet me quite often..yuk!

They love coffee as well..if you leave a half-empty mug out, any slugs around will soon home in on the mug.

I agree with DG..the black ones are loved by chub, and I've also caught perch, and once a jack of about 2lb, on them.

The worst thing about them IMO is removing a mangled one from a fish's mouth. Not a pretty sight..

Don't know about freezing them, though..

#10 Guest_sslatter_*

Guest_sslatter_*
  • Guests

Posted 01 May 2004 - 10:12 PM

Newt:
How well do they hold up when hooked? (slugs that is, not chub)

They've got a sort of oval-shaped callous (can't remember the proper term) on their backs, which is tougher than the rest of their skin, and which is the place to hook them. They hold up really well.