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Rudd on the fly


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#1 Sportsman

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 05:52 PM

Got the fly gear out for the first time tis year and had a go for the Rudd from my float tube.

God, those bites are quick.

I was getting lots of knocks or tugs but just wasn't fast enough to connect.

Changed to a size 16 dry so I could see the takes and finally started connecting.

That first 2 oz rudd felt like a real  achievement.

Ended up with a dozen up to about 12 ozs but really worked for them.

Trout will be dead easy after this.


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#2 Steve Walker

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 06:59 PM

I am always amused by the way that some trout fishermen are sniffy about coarse fish, as you say, trout on the fly are easy in comparison.

#3 Sportsman

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 08:16 PM

Yes, the trout pretty much hook themselves.


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#4 Leon Roskilly

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 09:49 PM

When the rudd are feeding, it takes me back to my bleak-snatching days, except my reactions aren't what they used to be.

 

Still it's a joy when I do connect :)

 

But I do wonder sometimes having spent a fair bit to fish a trout syndicate lake, finding myself hiding in the margins with a 3wt, and avoiding casting when I spot a trout!


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#5 Steve Burke

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 09:28 AM

My first several fly fishings trips were after rudd, partly because it was free fishing and I needed to practice a new branch of the sport.

 

It took a while to train my reflexes and, as noted above, trout were a doddle after the rudd.


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#6 Tony U

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 12:11 PM

My biggest Rudd 2lbs 12oz thereabouts was caught on a PTN and I have always enjoyed fishing for Coarse Fish on the fly. Indeed I learned to fly fish fishing for Roach and Perch at Killingworth Lake back in the 1970's.

Anyone interested in fly fishing for Coarse Fish shlould check this out: http://www.amazon.co...for coarse fish

Tony


Edited by Tony U, 07 June 2013 - 01:24 PM.

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#7 arbocop

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 10:57 PM

It is a challenge.  I've tried for coarse fish on the fly and managed dace, perch and roach but not rudd.  However, I would suggest a size 20 or 22 fly rather than a 16.  I don't know how well you will be able to see it, but it will give you more time.

 

I caught a dace on a dry mayfly once - it must have been the 20th take and even then it was hooked outside the mouth.  I've also had two 2lb perch on the same day on buzzer pupae when fishing for trout.  Neatly hooked in the scissors.


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#8 Vagabond

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 05:47 AM

Even with fast reactions, by the time the rod has flexed and the line picked up, the smaller coarse fish have often been and gone!  Very difficult to hook 'em if the first sign of activity is the rise itself.

 

I have found, if the water is clear enough, and you are near enough, for roach, rudd, dace and bleak , if you begin the strike as soon as you see the fish begin to go for the fly, then very often you hook it.  

 

Unlesss you are an out-and-out purist, you can simulate a "hatch" and get the fish rising if you take a few floating casters with you.  

(No - do NOT sneak one on the hook :nono: )

but chuck a few on the surface and fish a small dry.  Quill body in reddish brown if you believe in close imitation.  :hypocrite:

 

Alternatively, a few maggots now and then, and use a wet fly with a light body, such as a Peach Doll.

 

It was with a Peach Doll that I experienced a once-in-a lifetime miracle.  My fly arrived at the surface at the same time and place as a four pound mirror which had risen and opened its mouth to engulf something at the surface - the fly went in without touching the sides !   Unfortunately I was fishing alone, so there was no witness to my "skill".  (Dick Walker once told me "If ever you fluke something, never let on that you were surprised - behave as if you meant it")

 

Anyway, a good fight ensued, although carp are not as good fighters as brownies of the same weight. :whistling:  




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#9 Tony U

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 01:30 PM

Further to Vagabonds post; we used to tie caster flies, a suitably shaped piece of cork on a size 14  hook wrapped with maroon thread or floss and varnished, was an unsinkable imitation.


Tony

After a certain age, if you don't wake up aching in every joint, you are probably dead.