Jump to content


Photo
* * * * * 3 votes

Eating Perch...or any other prized species.


  • Please log in to reply
365 replies to this topic

#1 Andy Macfarlane

Andy Macfarlane

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,987 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Glasgow
  • Interests:Perch, Pike, Roach, Rooibos Tea, Rudd, Tench and Golden Virginia.

Posted 08 April 2006 - 09:26 PM

At the request of one of my fellow posters, I've started a thread on the subject of eating fish.

"I like Perch, I like fishing for Perch and sometimes I even eat the odd Perch. Would someone care to explain to me, what the problem is, without resorting to abuse? I can be pretty colourful myself so let's not start down that path.
A simple 'why' would suffice."
¤«Thʤ«PÔâ©H¤MëíTë®»¤

Click HERE for in-fighting, scrapping, name-calling, objectional and often explicit behaviour and cakes. Mind your tin-hat 

Click HERE for Tench Fishing World forums

Playboy.jpg

LandaPikkoSig.jpg

"I envy not him that eats better meat than I do, nor him that is richer, or that wears better clothes than I do. I envy nobody but him, and him only, that catches more fish than I do"
...Izaac Walton...

"It looked a really nice swim betwixt weedbed and bank"
...Vagabond...

#2 captain cojones

captain cojones

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,282 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:nr alicante,southern spain
  • Interests:drinking cold beer, and a bit of fishing

Posted 08 April 2006 - 09:33 PM

zanders better :thumbs:
dave.

#3 phil dean

phil dean

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,551 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Team Valley Gateshead
  • Interests:fishing, when i'm allowed and being a dad

Posted 08 April 2006 - 09:36 PM

don't see why not as long as the water allows it and they taste ok.

perch are meant to be very good eating, there used to be a commercial fishery for them in windermere i believe.

as long as our predation doesn't damage the stock balance then I don't see what the issue is.

it's just another version of the old "should I eat carp" debate. You do what's normal in yer mannor, carp are bread for the table in many countries, as they originally were here, but much as I'd never eat a 3lb perch unless there were dozens of them, i wouldn't eat a 30lb carp either (and if i did it'd have to spend alot of time in running water first.

I've had carp in prague (they have it like we have turkey at christmas) and pike and zander in the UK. pike are great if you can deal with the bones (which are lethal), can't actually remember the zander, but in both cases the fish were smaller specimens, the zander was about 2lb and i've had a few pike all under 5lb.

don't eat chub, they taste crap apparently.

Edited by phil dean, 08 April 2006 - 09:38 PM.

phil,
JOIN ANMC TODAY

#4 peter mccue

peter mccue

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,635 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Thornaby N' Yorkshire
  • Interests:everything to do with fish

Posted 08 April 2006 - 09:44 PM

don't see why not as long as the water allows it and they taste ok.

perch are meant to be very good eating, there used to be a commercial fishery for them in windermere i believe.

as long as our predation doesn't damage the stock balance then I don't see what the issue is.

it's just another version of the old "should I eat carp" debate. You do what's normal in yer mannor, carp are bread for the table in many countries, as they originally were here, but much as I'd never eat a 3lb perch unless there were dozens of them, i wouldn't eat a 30lb carp either (and if i did it'd have to spend alot of time in running water first.

I've had carp in prague (they have it like we have turkey at christmas) and pike and zander in the UK. pike are great if you can deal with the bones (which are lethal), can't actually remember the zander, but in both cases the fish were smaller specimens, the zander was about 2lb and i've had a few pike all under 5lb.

don't eat chub, they taste crap apparently.


Can't remember who, but somebody once said 'Chub taste like cotton wool full of needles'

Don't think it was Gordon Ramsey!
Peter.

The loose lines gone..STRIKE.

#5 Guest_NickInTheNorth_*

Guest_NickInTheNorth_*
  • Guests

Posted 08 April 2006 - 09:50 PM

I've eaten just about every native freshwater fish in the UK (in which I include Carp and Crucian Carp).

The only ones I would bother with again are perch, zander, grayling, trout, char, river caught roach and bream, gudgeon, small bleak (cooked like whitebait) and carp.

I prefer to eat the smaller fish rather than the more mature specimens.

#6 Sharkbyte

Sharkbyte

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,371 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 08 April 2006 - 10:11 PM

I think the problem is that if everyones belly rumbled and mouth began to water when they saw a 2lb+ perch in the landing net there wouldn't be to many left on certain venues.

To put this to the test, would you proudly hold up a dead 3lb'er and show it to the bailiff on the Great Ouse for instance, expecting congratulations and the sharing of a few recipes? I'd be inclined to think the fish would be banged on the head when no one is looking and swiftly hidden away in your bag.

I'm seriously starting to feel like the odd one out in the wonderful world of fishing. It seemed like every week fishing the local river over the winter months someone was telling me to eat this, give them that or throw them up the bank mate.

#7 Ken L

Ken L

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,379 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Kidderminster
  • Interests:Chucking lures, Martial arts and as much travel as possible

Posted 08 April 2006 - 10:12 PM

Back in the days when I was the youngest member of a fishing club, we had one old boy who would always take a couple of decent perch home for the table. He reckoned they were top nosh.
I've fancied trying it myself for a while but they're always either to small to bother with or to big to just knock on the head for the table.
Pike are well worth a go though and if you look on the web, there are plenty of US sites with fileting instructions so that you can avoid the bones - not that I very often take one for the pot.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima.  Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullen's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.
Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub. 
Species caught in 2014: Striped catfish. Pacu. Giant gourami. Clown knife fish. Rohu. Siamese carp. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Roach. Bream. Perch. Rainbow trout. Chub. Common Carp, Ide. Brown Trout. Barbel. Mekong catfish. Jullen's golden carp. Alligator gar. Java barb.
Species caught in 2013: Mangrove Jack. Barramundi. Blubberlip snapper. Baracouda. Malabar grouper. Yellowfin Trevally. Chub. Brown Trout. Perch. Roach. Pike. European Eel. Bleak.
Species caught in 2012: Northern whiting. Moray eel. Barramundi. Snakehead murrel. Silver razorbelly minnow. Deccan Mahseer. Malabar mystus. Deccan rita. Spotted Malabar Grouper. Mangrove Jack. Indian sea catfish. Brown Trout. Chub. Perch. Roach. Rudd.
Species caught in 2011: Indian sea catfish. Sardine. Barramundi. Mangrove Jack. Deccan Mahseer. Humpbacked Mahseer. Yellow Fin Trevelly. Giant Trevelly. Chub. Brown Trout. Perch. Pike. Atlantic salmon. Dace. Minnow. Roach. Gudgeon. 
Species caught in 2010: Barramundi. Giant Trevelly. Moray eel. Indian sea catfish. Mangrove Jack. Deccan Mahseer. Humpback Mahseer. Chub. Brown Trout. Perch. Bass. Pike. 
Species caught in 2009: Chub. Perch. Pike. Pacu. Thai Striped Catfish. 
Species caught in 2008: Barramundi. p-i-k-e-y sea bream. Indian sea catfish. Guitarfish. Mangrove Jack. Mahseer. Squid (Not strictly a fish but it took a lure !). Emperor Sweetlip. Black Spot Snapper. Moray eel. Spangled Emperor. Bluecheek silver grunt. Yellow striped emperor. Vanikoro sweeper. Pike. Perch. Brown trout. Chub. Atlantic salmon.


#8 peter mccue

peter mccue

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,635 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Thornaby N' Yorkshire
  • Interests:everything to do with fish

Posted 08 April 2006 - 10:30 PM

Morally there is no problem with eating any fish you choose to, but practically Sharkbyte's right.

Unless it was very well regulated stock levels would take a hammering, the reality of it is there's too many fishermen.

Incidentally, in times past the Salmon came second best - culinary wise - to Pike & Perch, & of course the Gudgeon was quite the delicacy.
Peter.

The loose lines gone..STRIKE.

#9 sam-cox

sam-cox

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,273 posts
  • Location:Dengie, Essex
  • Interests:angerling, bonking

Posted 09 April 2006 - 12:49 AM

Come on for christs sake! its 2006 not 1936 the war has finished and decent food is plentyfull, if you want to eat freshwater fish then but farmed carp or trout or any of the thousands of imported fish seen on market stools in London.
BASS MEMBER

IGFA Member.

Supporting ethical angling practices and wise use and conservation of fishery resources!

SACN Member.

NFSA Member.

Getting confused by politics!

MY LIST IS LONGER THAN YOURS!

#10 phil dean

phil dean

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,551 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Team Valley Gateshead
  • Interests:fishing, when i'm allowed and being a dad

Posted 09 April 2006 - 09:16 AM

if you've ever had wild salmon or trout, you'll know that the farmed fish are not a patch on them.

as i mentioned, it would depend on the fishery rules, but it would also depend on taking a sensible approach however, if factory farming were banned tomorrow, it wouldn't take another war for people to start looking at the food rescources under their noses. They can happily start with the rabbits in my field.
phil,
JOIN ANMC TODAY