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Vagabond, Need ID, Please


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#1 Bobj

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Posted 15 October 2014 - 08:48 PM

What is it?

 

Always called these, fringe finned trevally, but the little chappie has no yellow tail. Caught several 'yellow tailed trevally', but no fin filaments

 

IMG_0033_zpsb24135e9.jpg

 





Cheers, Bobj.

#2 Vagabond

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Posted 15 October 2014 - 09:29 PM

Looks very like the Epaulet Trevally   Carangoides humerosus   to me.   Look at the very large eye, characteristic of this species

 

C. humerosus is a coastal species, usually found  on the archipelago from  Singapore to Top End , dunno how far south its range extends.  Where did you catch it ?


Edited by Vagabond, 15 October 2014 - 09:32 PM.



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#3 Bobj

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Posted 15 October 2014 - 11:43 PM

Caught off Mackay, central coast of Qld. More good 'digging for treasure' looking up these beaut fish.

 

Thanks, mate. :thumbs:





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#4 Bobj

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 12:28 AM

Had a good squiz through most of the trevally family and came up with 2 that are closer than the epaulet, the longraker and the onion trevally, which is very close except that mine has long filaments on the dorsal and anal fins.

 

http://www.fishesofa...me/species/2998

 

http://australianmus...us-Ruppell-1830

 

 





Cheers, Bobj.

#5 Vagabond

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 06:31 AM

You could be right about the Onion Trevally, but your fish has a steeper forehead, and IMHO a bigger eye

 

It certainly seems to be one or the other.(Epaulet or Onion)

 

I would say it is not Longraker (which I know as Cale Cale)  Look at the black blotch at the rear of the gill cover, and the black markings on the tail root on your fish.  They don't appear on Cale Cale

 

BTW The fin filaments can be misleading. Many trevallies have them as juveniles but lose them as they get older.




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#6 Steve Walker

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 10:39 AM

I identify it as a snack!

#7 Bobj

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Posted 17 October 2014 - 03:30 AM

I sent the photo to the Australian Museum and they identified it as a Bumpnose Trevally, Carangoides hedlandensis.

 

Thanks for your input, Vagabond.





Cheers, Bobj.

#8 Bobj

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Posted 17 October 2014 - 03:52 AM

I identify it as a snack!

 

The bumpnose trevally, Carangoides hedlandensis (also known as the bumpnose kingfish and onion kingfish) is a species of relatively small inshore marine fish classified in the jack family Carangidae. The bumpnose trevally is fairly common in the tropical and subtropical waters of the Indo-west Pacific region, ranging from South Africa in the west to Japan and Samoa in the east. It is a small species by carangid standards, reaching a maximum known length of 32 cm, and can be distinguished from the similarly shaped Carangoides armatus by a distinct 'bump' on the snout, which gives the fish its common name. The species inhabits coastal waters, often living along bays and beaches, where it takes shrimp, small crabs, and juvenile fish as prey. The bumpnose trevally is of minor importance to fisheries throughout its range, taken by hook and line, trawls, and seine nets. It is also of minor importance to anglers, taken by baits from beaches and piers, and is considered a modest table fish.

 

:yucky:

 

Got plenty of good table fish off our beaches, Steve. :fishing1:





Cheers, Bobj.

#9 Steve Walker

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Posted 17 October 2014 - 09:14 AM

Looks tastier than it is then!

#10 corydoras

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Posted 17 October 2014 - 10:04 AM

Looks tastier than it is then!

Mebbe they wear the hijab?


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