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Giant Hogweed Identification

Giant Hogweed

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#1 philocalist

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 11:27 PM

     I think this stuff is starting to put in an appearance very locally to me - a particular problem as it's bankside within walking distance of the house, and I've two young lads who adore being there.....

 

You'll notice I said 'I think'.....   and that's the problem - I'm not at all sure and really do not want to take chances with this stuff, yet equally do not want to lose access to a large area of riverbank if the plants I'm seeing beginning to emerge are simply similar in appearance, yet safe to be around.

 

I've done the usual trolling through Google etc, but much of what I'm seeing online is very ambiguous, and there seem to be more than a few plants that appear to be quite similar in appearance until they start gettiung taller than I am...

 

Does anyone have a simple, foolproof way to identify Giant Hogweed, and set it clearly apart from other similar plants, or even an online link that does a particularly good job of it, perhaps comparing similar plants side by side to show the similarities and differences?

 

 

Thanks.



#2 Martin56

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 11:44 PM

Here's a Link which may help Peter.

 

https://www.google.c...XgRX6iXifgRxN3w


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#3 Ken L

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 06:05 AM

It's going to be very difficult to spot t this time of year but there's little chance of confusion when fully grown. It was on the canal near where I work but it looks like someone had the good sense to kill it.


Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima.  Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullen's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.
Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub. 
Species caught in 2014: Striped catfish. Pacu. Giant gourami. Clown knife fish. Rohu. Siamese carp. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Roach. Bream. Perch. Rainbow trout. Chub. Common Carp, Ide. Brown Trout. Barbel. Mekong catfish. Jullen's golden carp. Alligator gar. Java barb.
Species caught in 2013: Mangrove Jack. Barramundi. Blubberlip snapper. Baracouda. Malabar grouper. Yellowfin Trevally. Chub. Brown Trout. Perch. Roach. Pike. European Eel. Bleak.
Species caught in 2012: Northern whiting. Moray eel. Barramundi. Snakehead murrel. Silver razorbelly minnow. Deccan Mahseer. Malabar mystus. Deccan rita. Spotted Malabar Grouper. Mangrove Jack. Indian sea catfish. Brown Trout. Chub. Perch. Roach. Rudd.
Species caught in 2011: Indian sea catfish. Sardine. Barramundi. Mangrove Jack. Deccan Mahseer. Humpbacked Mahseer. Yellow Fin Trevelly. Giant Trevelly. Chub. Brown Trout. Perch. Pike. Atlantic salmon. Dace. Minnow. Roach. Gudgeon. 
Species caught in 2010: Barramundi. Giant Trevelly. Moray eel. Indian sea catfish. Mangrove Jack. Deccan Mahseer. Humpback Mahseer. Chub. Brown Trout. Perch. Bass. Pike. 
Species caught in 2009: Chub. Perch. Pike. Pacu. Thai Striped Catfish. 
Species caught in 2008: Barramundi. p-i-k-e-y sea bream. Indian sea catfish. Guitarfish. Mangrove Jack. Mahseer. Squid (Not strictly a fish but it took a lure !). Emperor Sweetlip. Black Spot Snapper. Moray eel. Spangled Emperor. Bluecheek silver grunt. Yellow striped emperor. Vanikoro sweeper. Pike. Perch. Brown trout. Chub. Atlantic salmon.


#4 philocalist

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 11:07 AM

Thanks for the link Martin, though its very similar in content to those I've already seen. Part of the problem is that the images shown are usually way too small to show any usable detail - it would be very useful to find a site somewhere that laid out decent sized images of Giant Hogweed alongside similar images of the other plants that it is so similar to.

The other problem of course is that one of the key identifiers is it's immense size, which of course is little help when the Common Hpogweed will usually hit a couple of metres easily, and at least a metre more when adjacent to fresh water   ...   size-wise, well into the territory or Giant Hogweed. And, of course, its just as much of a problem in its smaller sizes, on the way to becoming a giant.



#5 Phone

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 01:34 PM

Philo,

 

It looks different during different stages of the life cycle.  Are you allowed to use herbicides or are they restricted to professional applicators?  The only one I have experience with on Giant Hogweed is Roundup Pro.  It does a number on the existing plant.  Problem is you have to make a fall application as well.  All the seeds don't germinate at the same time.  It may take a two year cycle to be sure .  Ohh, a heavy planting of grass is helpful (at least was for me).  I have only one experience so my info may be limited (?).

 

Phone

 

Roundup Pro does not kill grasses.



#6 lutra

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 05:20 PM

At this time of year just put your wellies on and stamp to death anything near the water that looks like a hogweed. Job done.


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#7 chesters1

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 08:50 PM

We used to use the stalks as blow pipes as kids ,the lips got a bit tingly but nothing untowardly dangerous happened same with japanese knotweed ,great stuff to play with .
Let it live kids will learn the proper way the hard way which tends to be the best

Believe NOTHING anyones says or writes unless you witness  it yourself and even then your eyes can deceive you

 

There is only one opinion i listen to ,its mine and its ALWAYS right even when its wrong

 

Its far easier to curse the darkness than light one candle

 

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#8 ayjay

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 10:55 PM

We used to use the stalks as blow pipes as kids

 

You must have a big gob Chesters, the stems can be  5" in diameter.  :o

 

What was the ammo, tennis balls?  :D



#9 Phone

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 02:05 AM

Chesters1,

 

I thought it was hollow only between joints?

 

Phone



#10 chesters1

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 06:09 AM

Chesters1,
 
I thought it was hollow only between joints?
 
Phone

It is just like bamboo ,you can poke a hole through with the long metal rod from a stirrup pump (look that up kids)
And rather than fainting trying to blow through the big sections you use the thin ones lol
Despite all the effort of these newspaper headline 'killer' plants (and theres many ),lead paint ,asbestos ,steam rollers ,horses and a million other now dreaded things children are banned from getting within a 100 miles most survived ,how modern kids can gain experience of anything or build up resistance in this clean dangerless society could rebound badly i am afraid ,one day looking at a freshly caught fish could be taboo incase it infects you with something.

Edited by chesters1, 12 April 2017 - 06:20 AM.

Believe NOTHING anyones says or writes unless you witness  it yourself and even then your eyes can deceive you

 

There is only one opinion i listen to ,its mine and its ALWAYS right even when its wrong

 

Its far easier to curse the darkness than light one candle

 

Whitby scallops caught by scottish boats best that money can buy,the nearer the shore they're dredged the better they taste