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ledgering for roach in deep, wide river


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#1 The Flying Tench

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 10:00 PM

I have always struggled with this. The current puts such pressure on the line, and hence the tip, that I can't see how I will notice a shy roach bite. It will make very little difference to the tip position. I know that I have to let out some line so the line is in a bow, and that helps a bit, but so far I've never felt this solves the problem.

 

I know that one option is upstream feeder, but I have never made this work in a wide river with weed. Maybe I'm missing a trick? 

 

Has anyone tried bolt rig in this context?

 

Thanks


john clarke

#2 Martin56

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 11:44 PM

You could try a "Back Lead" with upstream feeder (a lead above the feeder) can then hold bottom with the lightest of feeders upstream!!

 

This should show as a drop back bite  - when the bent tip straightens out/slackens, (or starts to) -  Strike!!

 

Experiment with the distance between the feeder and the back lead.


Edited by Martin56, 18 June 2018 - 11:56 PM.

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#3 Phone

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 03:07 AM

Tench,

 

How far do you have to cast.?  Fluorocarbon line (as light as you wish) with a hook tied straight to the mainline.  Often fish(ed) the wide Missouri River. 5.5mph.  A tip.  If I wanted to fish a rather distant spot I used ice cubes for weight.  The hollow ones, I use big hooks but I'd bet you wouldn't even have to re-tie.  Bait is tracking toward the bottom but Ice floats so you have to overcast the target area a bit.

 

Phone 



#4 Steve Walker

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 09:05 AM

Is this the Thames by any chance, John? We did some feeder fishing on the Thames last year, there is a knack to it, but it's workable. Cast upstream, let it settle on a slack line and don't tighten up too much. Expect drop-backs. You might need to fiddle with the weight of the feeder or lead to get it to work. Trial and error.



#5 Ken L

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 12:35 PM

I've tried bolt rigs in similar situations with mixed success. It seemed to work best in flooded conditions when desperately scratching for bits.

All I did was put a rubber float stop and a bead on the line before the feeder. Slide it a foot up the line and everything works as a standard feeder rig but slide it right down and it's a semi fixed bolt rig. Give it just a couple of inches and it will self hook but allow enough movement for bites from small fish to show on the quiver tip.


Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima.  Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.
Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullien's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.
Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub. 
Species caught in 2014: Striped catfish. Pacu. Giant gourami. Clown knife fish. Rohu. Siamese carp. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Roach. Bream. Perch. Rainbow trout. Chub. Common Carp, Ide. Brown Trout. Barbel. Mekong catfish. Jullien's golden carp. Alligator gar. Java barb.
Species caught in 2013: Mangrove Jack. Barramundi. Blubberlip snapper. Baracouda. Malabar grouper. Yellowfin Trevally. Chub. Brown Trout. Perch. Roach. Pike. European Eel. Bleak.
Species caught in 2012: Northern whiting. Moray eel. Barramundi. Snakehead murrel. Silver razorbelly minnow. Deccan Mahseer. Malabar mystus. Deccan rita. Spotted Malabar Grouper. Mangrove Jack. Indian sea catfish. Brown Trout. Chub. Perch. Roach. Rudd.
Species caught in 2011: Indian sea catfish. Sardine. Barramundi. Mangrove Jack. Deccan Mahseer. Record Humpbacked Mahseer. Yellow Fin Trevelly. Giant Trevelly. Chub. Brown Trout. Perch. Pike. Atlantic salmon. Dace. Minnow. Roach. Gudgeon. 
Species caught in 2010: Barramundi. Giant Trevelly. Moray eel. Indian sea catfish. Mangrove Jack. Deccan Mahseer. Humpback Mahseer. Chub. Brown Trout. Perch. Bass. Pike. 
Species caught in 2009: Chub. Perch. Pike. Pacu. Thai Striped Catfish. 
Species caught in 2008: Barramundi. p-i-k-e-y sea bream. Indian sea catfish. Guitarfish. Mangrove Jack. Mahseer. Squid (Not strictly a fish but it took a lure !). Emperor Sweetlip. Black Spot Snapper. Moray eel. Spangled Emperor. Bluecheek silver grunt. Yellow striped emperor. Vanikoro sweeper. Pike. Perch. Brown trout. Chub. Atlantic salmon.


#6 The Flying Tench

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 06:37 PM

Thanks, Steve

Yes it's the Thames. Did it work for roach? I understand the principle of fishing a balanced feeder, but my problem in practice is that I've balanced it on one cast, and then the next cast the bottom isn't quite the same, maybe there is weed, and it isn't balanced. It worked OK once on the Kennet where I was only fishing a rod length or two out and the bottom was uniform gravel, but ol' Father Thames isn't so easy. I admit part of the problem is confidence. With other ways of ledgering I can start with maggot and catch a few tiddlers to prove the rig is working, but the tiddlers don't dislodge a balanced feeder for me.

 

How far upstream were you casting?

 

John

Is this the Thames by any chance, John? We did some feeder fishing on the Thames last year, there is a knack to it, but it's workable. Cast upstream, let it settle on a slack line and don't tighten up too much. Expect drop-backs. You might need to fiddle with the weight of the feeder or lead to get it to work. Trial and error.


john clarke

#7 The Flying Tench

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 06:43 PM

Martin, thanks but I don't quite understand this. Presumably the back lead is a running lead? So for a drop back bite the running lead still needs to be dislodged. What is the advantage over just a heavier feeder? Probably I don't understand the rig.

You could try a "Back Lead" with upstream feeder (a lead above the feeder) can then hold bottom with the lightest of feeders upstream!!

 

This should show as a drop back bite  - when the bent tip straightens out/slackens, (or starts to) -  Strike!!

 

Experiment with the distance between the feeder and the back lead.


john clarke

#8 The Flying Tench

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 06:46 PM

Thanks, Ken

I note the bit about the conditions. When I experimented with bolt rig for roach in a lake I found it only really worked for the bigger fish (say over half a pound, can't quite remember) with bigger baits, not maggot.

I've tried bolt rigs in similar situations with mixed success. It seemed to work best in flooded conditions when desperately scratching for bits.

All I did was put a rubber float stop and a bead on the line before the feeder. Slide it a foot up the line and everything works as a standard feeder rig but slide it right down and it's a semi fixed bolt rig. Give it just a couple of inches and it will self hook but allow enough movement for bites from small fish to show on the quiver tip.


john clarke

#9 Steve Walker

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 06:46 PM

It was here, John, fishing for (and catching) roach. Chucking maybe 2/3 - 3/4 of the way across. Flow was right to left and I was aiming for the tree that's half in shot on the right.

 

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#10 chesters1

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 08:07 PM

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