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Reservoir zander


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#21 Steve Walker

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Posted 20 September 2018 - 04:05 PM

Fluoro - and yes, a knot is the answer. Rusty said that it was better for the action, and I added that it was better for the tip ring!

#22 Phone

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Posted 20 September 2018 - 04:25 PM

All,

 

Thench, do not get to concerned about the technical aspect of zander fishing. They don't require the "British" attention to detail most fish do. Location location location is the key.  If you find them - they will cooperate.  In addition to their fine flavor, ease of catching them is a main reason they are as popular as they are in the US.

 

At coffee this morning I was asking about deep water walleye.  According to my "experts" they require much slower jigging.  The deeper the fish the more sensitive a tip you may need (we call it fast action). The "zone" 3 to 18 inches off the bottom is more difficult to maintain in deep water (I guess?)

As always, the conversation turned to hooks.  This is a case where sharpness is mandatory.  Still, they are just fish.

 

Phone

 

Phone



#23 Steve Walker

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Posted 20 September 2018 - 05:08 PM

Sharp hooks are indeed necessary. I bought some small fine wire trebles to make up the stingers, and I can confirm that they stung me repeatedly in handling them. Bloody evil things.

#24 The Flying Tench

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Posted 23 September 2018 - 08:08 PM

Phone says you need a sensitive tip, but clearly for jigging in deep water this has to be a trade off with needing sufficient weight to get down reasonably vertically. But what about drop-shotting? Nobody has mentioned this so far. As I understand it the weight stays on the bottom, and you just move the lure up and down. Have I got that right?


john clarke

#25 Phone

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Posted 24 September 2018 - 01:42 AM

Tench,

 

This topic is going to be a misunderstanding of two people who speak the same language meaning something different.

 

Sensitivity is how well you can feel a bite or the bottom through the rod. You cannot "drop shot" at 40ft.  Geez, I can't hardly tell the difference between the bottom and a bite at 10 ft. Drop shot fishing is not static. If you try to zander fish at 40ft pinned to the bottom you will be lucky if the fish catches itself.

When jigging for walleye, the bites can be very light and extremely subtle. The walleye rod you use should be a faster action that responds quickly to the bite, but so sensitive that you can feel every movement and change in pressure on the jig. Sensitive walleye jigging rods are extremely sought after. These rods have a light graphite feel with a fast enough action to notice the feather-light bite of a walleye.

 

Fast equals stiff

Forget the word "tip"

 

 

It may be confusing but there are an uncalculated number of url sites that can explain this better than I can in proper American English  My walleye rod is made by Lamiglas.

 

Phone



#26 Steve Walker

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Posted 24 September 2018 - 10:36 AM

Probably helps to summarise that you aren't watching the tip for bites, you're feeling for them (and watching the line for slack).

#27 Kappa

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Posted 24 September 2018 - 06:34 PM

Dear John,

 

I sent you a text message, feel free to just give me a call if you want to come along with me one day or to have a chat about tactics etc, its too much to write here! My next trip to Rutland is on Friday if you want!

 

Brief points in order of importance:

 

  1. You'll need a fish finder. They are not absolutely essential but without them you would likely struggle to find the areas / depths where the fish are. If you know the water well you may be able to get away without one, but I'd never leave without mine. If you want to, I have one you can have (basic) or one you could buy (advanced)
  2. Low diameter braid is important. Getting the best one is the tricky, too thin and its too fragile, too thick and its impossible to fish with. I have always used 8lb braid, 14lb is too thick.
  3. The rod is important. Ideally you want a short stiff rod like Steve Walker describes. I wouldn't buy one until you know you like it but its unlikely you already have a suitable rod. Not many rods that are OK on the Thames can handle a 50g Jig head.
  4. As I understand the rules you have to use wire if you use trebles
  5. You need a drogue but all boats have them now so you don't need to buy one

 

That's it for the major points and all the separates you from a blank and >20 zander. Beyond that a trip with someone who knows what they are doing will short cut a lot of learning, Rutland is no longer super easy and I've seen people blank. Grafham is a heart breaker so I wouldn't start there!

 

As I have said, I have all you would need to fish there, all you would need to bring is yourself, waterproofs and your lunch!

 

Rich


Edited by Kappa, 24 September 2018 - 06:36 PM.


#28 The Flying Tench

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Posted 25 September 2018 - 07:30 PM

Hi Rich

That is fantastic. I'd love to come this Friday! What time are you leaving, and when roughly would you expect to get back? Presumably I come to your place on Ladygrove. What is your address?

 

Andrew also kindly offered for a Tuesday, so I have been spoilt for choice. But Friday is better for me, and also I have slight health conditions which mean that it would be tricky for me to drive back from Witney after a longish day in the dark.

 

There is another slight condition I should mention. My back trouble is a little worse than when we fished at Wallingford, and I don't know if I will last the whole day sitting on a seat with no back. But the worst case would just be that you had to drop me off onto the bank for a bit. Andrew said something about him having a seat with a back. I've got a folding canvas garden chair that I use for bank fishing, but I can't imagine it would fit in a boat?

 

Hope that's all OK. Really looking forward to it. Thank you so much!

 

John


Edited by The Flying Tench, 25 September 2018 - 10:40 PM.

john clarke

#29 Phone

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Posted 26 September 2018 - 05:42 PM

Tench/Kappa,

 

Looking forward to a report, hopefully with a couple photos. come the weekend or first of the week.  It warms my heart to see sessions like this put together.

 

Phone



#30 The Flying Tench

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Posted 30 September 2018 - 03:15 PM

A great day in all sorts of ways. I was worried that my back wouldn't hold out, but the revolving boat seat which Rich had kindly borrowed for me from Anderoo was brilliant, and I had no problems. Rutland Water is a truly beautiful venue, and I caught 4 zander. None were large, but as I have never caught a zander before they amounted to a solid pb! Also some perch. It was the first time I have ever done this type of vertical jigging.  Sincere thanks to Rich for taking me. I would never have found the fish without his expertise, and I learned much about the actual fishing, too. Thanks also to Rusty for loan of a rod, and Rich for the other rod and tackle.

 

A completely new form of fishing with great company in a beautiful venue. What more could one ask!


Edited by The Flying Tench, 30 September 2018 - 03:26 PM.

john clarke