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philocalist

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philocalist last won the day on July 25 2015

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About philocalist

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    Tyneside
  • Interests
    Ex pro photographer, now designing websites! Lure fishing, predators and centrepins :-)

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  1. Have had one for a while, not used it a lot though, TBH. Biggest single issue is that the suction pads are useless for any practical purpose - I removed them, drilled through and then screwed the contraption down into plugs in a large brick (on the bottom of which I put a rubber sheet, for grip, and to avoid damage to the table top. NOW, it's sits still in use, which makes a big difference. The mechanism that holds your spool is a bit agricultural - if you can get the tension right, it works well enough, but its a fine line between being too tight / loose, and letting line off smoothly under t
  2. Peter - I fall into a similar category to you, where I could with no doubt at all fish safely, 100% without standing any chance of compromising someone else - it's bloody frustrating, to say the least. The (tidal) riverbank, controlled by the club (where I'm a committee member, and bailiff) is a 3 minute walk away from where I live. Likewise, the nearest club lake is a similar distance - both can be accessed along a short section of dead-end road, passing just 3 properties en-route, on a pathway at least 25 metres away from garden boundaries - we pass each other every day walking dogs as a mat
  3. Nice - sort of. No good to us here in the UK currently - free or otherwise, ALL fishing is banned for the foreseeable future, due to the measures deemed necessary to help control this bloody virus!
  4. Hi Nosey Student - your post has made me curious, in no small part because I can see part of Durham Uni from where I'm sitting, but also in part because I was unaware that any sort of academical work even loosely related to this sort of topic went on there - its never been known as a hot-bed for scientific study Which department / course are you studying with? May well be interested - fished almost exclusively for predators for neck-end of 50 years
  5. Sussed it On closer scrutiny, the wording on the website has changed overnight very slightly - it's now referred to as a 'free permit', though the capture I did yesterday confirms it used to say 'licence'. Turns out you DO need an EA salmon licence to fish, plus the permit for internal purposes of recoding catches.
  6. Don't think its meant as an incentive as such Martin, either for existing members or to attract new ones - just a perk of belonging to the club. I'm more interested in te mechanics of how this works, i.e. how is the club able to do this - for example, is it legitimately possible to buy a 'club' salmon licence, and then farm it out on a daily basis to any member who requests it? Personally, I think thats unlikely, but I'd love to know how it has been arranged as I'm assuming this must have involved the EA at some level?
  7. Seen that thanks Phone - was the first place I looked - what is apparently being offered though is an entirely free daily salmon licence, for any club member, available simply on request for a specific day.....
  8. Not exactly coarse fishing related directly BUT ... I noticed earlier today on the website of a nearby angling club (that is predominently a coarse anglers club, categoricall NOT one stuffed with game anglers), that a 'FREE' salmon licence is available to their members on a daily basis, allowing them to fish for salmon on the river fishing they control, which sees a fairly limited run of fish each year. For a very casual angler who might dabble with salmon fishing occasionally, this seems like manna from Heaven, but it's not something I've seen before, nor even been aware of in a life
  9. Just had a large, similar problem, but with rats -= eventually managed to get rid of 47 of the nasty little buggers - and a mouse - using simple, traditional rat-traps. They randomly took both cheese and Nutella, but two tricks I found were invaluable wer 1/ push the bait well down into the bait-hoders, so it cant simply be grabbed and removed, and 2/ the traps themselves needed a bit of tweaking to be fully effective. The triggers are invariably a simple plastic affair, but not particularly precise - a simple fettle / trim with a Stanley knife or similar made them much more sensitive, and con
  10. Personally, if a fish is hooked so deeply that a disgorger and forcep are not enough to effect removal, Id cut the line as far down as was safely possible, then return the fish as quickly as I could with the minimum of fuss. Most hooks commonly used in freshwater fishing within the UK will quickly corrode and disintegrate in water within a few days - more quickly when being attacked by various bodily fluids / digestive acids within a fish. Digging about down there ()in the stomach?) is only goiung to cause trauma and possibly further injury. The exception to this would be a deeply hooked pike
  11. Dunno - plenty of evidence of adult ducks being taken by pike in the 20's - would guess their moths are smaller than a cat?
  12. I'll be honest, I wear polarising lenses a lot, and they DO work for me, most of the time. Thing is, for them to work effectively, the light needs to be coming in the correct direction, relative to the direction in which you are facing, AND the angle of the light hitting the water. The orientation of the lens within the frame of your glasses also has a profound effect. Under the right conditions, you will lose virtually 100% of surface glare. I'll confess, a lifetime as a pro photographer gave me perhaps a better understanding of light than most, including what polarisation can, and canno
  13. Thats a nifty trick - simple but effective, going to nick it :-)
  14. :D Housebound for a bit despite the current glorious weather, so jusy mooching about online trying to stave off baredom - revisited this topic out of curiosity as I was the OP ... amazing how far, and how quickly - a topic can stray / evlove(?) from the original ... a lake turning over to bears, moose hunting and getting hpelessly lost within about a dozen posts
  15. Thanks for the info so far - I've pretty much got my head around the uses of manure and / or barley straw, though for the intended purpose it looks as though Siltex would be better suited, though much more expensive - its a smallish lake of around 3 acres, but best prices / advice indicate it will cost neck-end of £1000 to treat ther lake in the first year alone - a bit more than the manure option, which is available free locally as we seem to be surrounded by riding schools :-) The biggest single issue now is the question of legality - I can't actually find anything to indicate the practi
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