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Why 'Avon tops' & 'Quiver tips'?


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Greetings, :thumbs:

 

Confused I am re. the reasoning behind [a] Avon rod tips, and quiver tips.

 

I'll attempt to make my query short & simple. What is the pertinence of an Avon tip or top? I've just been glancing at a Fishtec brochure advertising a Matt Hayes 'all rounder' rod which features an 'Avon top, or tip' plus three various t.c. quiver tips. Can someone tell me why one would use an 'Avon top' & does/can one fish 'straight out' using a quiver tip, or does set the rod at an angle to the line in order to indicate a 'quiver-on-the-quiver-tip, in the event that one gets a bite?

 

Also, why is it that John Wilson's 'Avon Rod' package is supposedly the highest selling rod of all time?

 

Please advise?

 

Mr H.

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An Avon rod is a stepped up float rod suitable for fishing for good sized fish. It makes a great all rounder for the larger species, for float fishing for chub, tench, barbel, bream, moderately sized carp, etc. It can also be used for legering where bite detection is by feeling the line, using a bobbin or a bite alarm or waiting for something to pull the rod in.

 

A quivertip rod uses a spliced in or push-fit section of fine, solid glass fibre or carbon fibre, painted for visibility, to allow the most sensitive of bites to be spotted while legering simply by watching the end of the rod. The blank of an Avon rod makes a good starting point for a quivertip rod - you just need to cut some of the tip section off and splice in the quivertip - so it is not uncommon to provide one butt section with a choice of quivertip or Avon top section, thus providing two rods for the price of one and a half.

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Guest bbamboo

I have a Wilson travel Avon.

The rod can be used with the standard tip as a float rod or used with one of the quiver tip sections for bottom fishing. The reason why it is so popular is because it is so versatile it can be used for almost all techniques.

I use mine a great deal their outstanding rods in IMO

Everyone should have one I really cannot rate them high enough.

 

 

Gary

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I've got a pair of the original (and the best !) JW avons, I've replaced both the handles and fitted fuji screw reel fittings to improve them as the sliding reel fitting was the only weak point they had. Still going strong after 20 odd years, landed Barbel to 13lbs, Carp to 26lbs( after a long fight! )but just as at home quiver tipping for dace, roach, chub etc...

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An Avon rod is a stepped up float rod suitable for fishing for good sized fish. It makes a great all rounder for the larger species, for float fishing for chub, tench, barbel, bream, moderately sized carp, etc. It can also be used for legering where bite detection is by feeling the line, using a bobbin or a bite alarm or waiting for something to pull the rod in.

 

A quivertip rod uses a spliced in or push-fit section of fine, solid glass fibre or carbon fibre, painted for visibility, to allow the most sensitive of bites to be spotted while legering simply by watching the end of the rod. The blank of an Avon rod makes a good starting point for a quivertip rod - you just need to cut some of the tip section off and splice in the quivertip - so it is not uncommon to provide one butt section with a choice of quivertip or Avon top section, thus providing two rods for the price of one and a half.

 

 

Hello, its me again, Heritulus :)

 

Before I continue I thank you all for responding to my Avon/quiver tip post, much appreciated it is. To continue with the queries - In terms of this man using a quiver-tip leger rod; let us assume that I'm casting out 25 yards to a reed bed, island or whatever. I let the feeder sink to the bottom then I assume one sets the rod [using rod rests or a pod] at an angle to the mainline, this to emphasise a bite [via the quiver tip] in the event that one is lucky enough to get one? :)

 

Have I got this right, please comment? :mellow:

 

Regards, ;)

 

H

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Guest bbamboo
Hello, its me again, Heritulus :)

 

Before I continue I thank you all for responding to my Avon/quiver tip post, much appreciated it is. To continue with the queries - In terms of this man using a quiver-tip leger rod; let us assume that I'm casting out 25 yards to a reed bed, island or whatever. I let the feeder sink to the bottom then I assume one sets the rod [using rod rests or a pod] at an angle to the mainline, this to emphasise a bite [via the quiver tip] in the event that one is lucky enough to get one? :)

 

Have I got this right, please comment? :mellow:

 

Regards, ;)

 

H

Yes

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The problem with the older Wilson rod is it only has one spliced in quiver tip so you can't swap tips for different flows/conditions/fish etc so your stuck with the quite heavy tip. Modern rods have three or more push in tips enableing better bit detection.

There are lots of other avon quiver rods available which in my opinion far outclass the older wilson rod for example the drennan series 7 avon quiver.

Although i do have avon quiver rods I prefer to have a seperate quiver rod and a specialist rod.

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Yes, that's correct. On a stillwater or a slow moving river, you would set your rod up on rests horizontally, parallel to the bank (or rather, at 90 degrees to the direction you are casting in). The man in the picture is using a target board, which makes small twitches of the tip easier to see.

 

fclegerp2.jpg

 

On a faster moving river, this option puts too much of the line in the water where it is subject to the drag of the current, so instead the rod is set up with the tip up in the air.

 

450px-Feeder_fishing.JPG

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Guest bbamboo
Yes, that's correct. On a stillwater or a slow moving river, you would set your rod up on rests horizontally, parallel to the bank (or rather, at 90 degrees to the direction you are casting in). The man in the picture is using a target board, which makes small twitches of the tip easier to see.

 

fclegerp2.jpg

 

On a faster moving river, this option puts too much of the line in the water where it is subject to the drag of the current, so instead the rod is set up with the tip up in the air.

 

450px-Feeder_fishing.JPG

 

 

Well put Steve

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I've got a pair of the original (and the best !) JW avons, I've replaced both the handles and fitted fuji screw reel fittings to improve them as the sliding reel fitting was the only weak point they had. Still going strong after 20 odd years, landed Barbel to 13lbs, Carp to 26lbs( after a long fight! )but just as at home quiver tipping for dace, roach, chub etc...

 

Hello Graeme, :)

 

Thank you for your 'Avon & quiver tip' reply. Hell's teeth Graeme, I'm impressed inasmuch as you've replaced the handle & reel fitting on your John Wilson rod. I've often glanced at the excellent finish one 'gets' with the average rod handle & thought "I hope I'll never have to replace that". You must be a real handy lad, and the reel fitting anall! :)

 

How did you get the reel fitting off, I always thought they might be glued on, it would appear not? :mellow:

 

Regards, ;)

 

H

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