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I was fishing by a lake last night and a big swan took a liking to me and my bread - he waddled on his great big feet out of the water right in front of me, gave a shake and wet me slightly a bit like a dog, and then started nosing into my tackle bag in search of bread - little did he know that wasn't where I kept it. I started to pat him on the head and stroke him a bit like a dog, and he didn't seem to object - though i don't delude myself into thinking it was out of deep affection!

 

Has anyone else found swans to be quite so tame?

john clarke

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Guest Jan V

i've seen lots of people feeding swans at local ponds but never seen one get quite that friendly. you're lucky it wasn't a goose. they can be real mean critters!!!

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Sounds terible but I usually tap them on the head with my rod if they get to close.

On my local waters, they get very tame and will let you feed or stroke them if you have bread but I for one would much rather see them seeking natural food and being a bit more wary of man - especially as two or three swans have ended up being shot and killed with air pistols over the last three years.

Species caught in 2020: Barbel. European Eel. Bleak. Perch. Pike.

Species caught in 2019: Pike. Bream. Tench. Chub. Common Carp. European Eel. Barbel. Bleak. Dace.

Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullien's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.

Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub.

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Off on holiday with the kids and we stopped at some place to eat with a lake.

 

Lots of waterfowl to be fed, but as soon as the kids started feeding the ducks on the grass, the swans were out of the water looking for their share (everything!)

 

One large nasty mean tempered white beast had devloped the technique of going right up to people and terrifying them into dropping all the bread as they beat a hasty retreat.

 

It tried it on me.

 

I simply reached out and grasped it by the neck as it stuck it's menacing face into mine, and said "What yer going to do now".

 

I'm not sure if a swan's face is built to register shock and surprise, but this one did a passable imitation, as it tried to back away, but was unable to move in any direction.

 

I gave it a stern talking to, then released it to rush back down the bank and into the water.

 

I wonder if it learned its lesson, or just made a mental note to steer clear of anything that looked like me!

 

 

I must admit that the swans at Sun Pier soon learned to stay away from me when I was fishing, but picked up on the fact that when I took my hat off and broke down my landing net, I was about to empty my bread-bag into the water.

 

It became something of a ritual that having stayed out of my way (well out of the way of my landing net!) during my sessions there, they would swarm around expectantly when I started to pack away.

RNLI Shoreline Member

Member of the Angling Trust

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Classic Leon! :roll1::roll1:

On the old Manor Farm stretch, behind the nature reserve at North Muskham, a swan came all the way over from the Holme bank, then flapped its way up a steep, ten foot high bank, then sat down beside me for about an hour.

Years ago, I was fishing at a gravel pit, when a grey lag goose on the gravel margins saw me from about 100 yards away and walked along the bank towards me. I was sitting on a low chair at the time and it suddenly jumped up and sat on my knee!

I honestly don't know what I have done to deserve this.

Edited by Peter Sharpe

English as tuppence, changing yet changeless as canal water, nestling in green nowhere, armoured and effete, bold flag-bearer, lotus-fed Miss Havishambling, opsimath and eremite, feudal, still reactionary, Rawlinson End.

 

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Absolutely - also Pete's story! :lol:

I can assure you that when that goose was sitting on my lap, I was getting some very strange glances from dog walkers. I felt uneasy about the poor creature really, because I had a feeling it wouldn't last very long behaving in that way.

English as tuppence, changing yet changeless as canal water, nestling in green nowhere, armoured and effete, bold flag-bearer, lotus-fed Miss Havishambling, opsimath and eremite, feudal, still reactionary, Rawlinson End.

 

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Guest Jan V

Geese were known to chase us to crawl up to the top of our vehicle where I used to work. Many bruises to those who didn't make it. Newt mad me a goose stick and I smacked a few (only in self defense).

 

LOVE your story, Leon. I can just see you doing that with that grin of yours. :clap2: :clap2:

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