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Hooking Worms


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Hi everyone

 

On my last Carp trip i thought i would give worms ago with so quite good results but more times than not i found the worm had wiggled off the hook even tho it was a barbed hook.How can i keep these worms on my hook & what size hook should i use.Oh n the worms i'm using are nice fat juicy earth worms.

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Hi everyone

 

On my last Carp trip i thought i would give worms ago with so quite good results but more times than not i found the worm had wiggled off the hook even tho it was a barbed hook.How can i keep these worms on my hook & what size hook should i use.Oh n the worms i'm using are nice fat juicy earth worms.

 

 

 

Hi. I had a similar problem until another angler suggested using worm hooks. There main differance is that they have barbs up the shank of the hook.

Another angler suggested to me to thread the worm up the line leaving only 1/3 of the worm to wiggle, then trying a bit of bait elastic around the worm at the top of the hook shank.

I tryed it and found it worked well enought for me, as it got me a new PB Perch (3lb 6oz).

 

Hope it helps you m8, and wishing you tight lines.

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some people like to use a tiny little bit of rubber to keep them on but personaly i feel that pulling the hook through then pulling the eye of the hook + knot inside the worm can do just aswel and presents the hook alot better

Edited by Andy_1984

Owner of Tacklesack.co.uk


Moderator at The-Pikers-Pit.co.uk

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One reason why worms come off the hook is using too small a hook. Additionally, if you use too small a hook you'll miss bites. For lobworms my standard hook is a fine wire size 6. This may seem a large hook to many, but on such a heavy bait such a hook won't affect the behaviour of the bait.

Wingham Specimen Coarse & Carp Syndicates www.winghamfisheries.co.uk Beautiful, peaceful, little fished gravel pit syndicates in Kent with very big fish. 2017 Forum Fish-In Sat May 6 to Mon May 8. Articles http://www.anglersnet.co.uk/steveburke.htm Index of all my articles on Angler's Net

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I'd go along with a piece of rubber band, it's worked fine for me and has the advantage of being cheap (I'm a Yorkshireman with Scottish ancestry - we even save our dishwater....). Also, don't hook the worm through the saddle, there are a lot of organs there and the worm will die faster. Hook through the head end and (as already said) nip the tail off :)

John S

Quanti Canicula Ille In Fenestra

 

Species caught in 2017 Common Ash, Hawthorn, Hazel, Scots Pine, White Willow.

Species caught in 2016: Alder, Blackthorn, Common Ash, Crab Apple, Left Earlobe, Pedunculate Oak, Rock Whitebeam, Scots Pine, Smooth-leaved Elm, Swan, Wayfaring tree.

Species caught in 2015: Ash, Bird Cherry, Black-Headed Gull, Common Hazel, Common Whitebeam, Elder, Field Maple, Gorse, Puma, Sessile Oak, White Willow.

Species caught in 2014: Big Angry Man's Ear, Blackthorn, Common Ash, Common Whitebeam, Downy Birch, European Beech, European Holly, Hawthorn, Hazel, Scots Pine, Wych Elm.
Species caught in 2013: Beech, Elder, Hawthorn, Oak, Right Earlobe, Scots Pine.

Species caught in 2012: Ash, Aspen, Beech, Big Nasty Stinging Nettle, Birch, Copper Beech, Grey Willow, Holly, Hazel, Oak, Wasp Nest (that was a really bad day), White Poplar.
Species caught in 2011: Blackthorn, Crab Apple, Elder, Fir, Hawthorn, Horse Chestnut, Oak, Passing Dog, Rowan, Sycamore, Willow.
Species caught in 2010: Ash, Beech, Birch, Elder, Elm, Gorse, Mullberry, Oak, Poplar, Rowan, Sloe, Willow, Yew.

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Rubber band can be helpful, I agree.

 

But if there are none of those about, I simply push the worm up a bit so the eye (or spade end - depending what method / species I am doing) of the hook is in the body of the worm. This tends to make it less likely to slip / wriggle off.

 

I sometimes then put the end of the hook through the worm once more, so not too much hook is showing.

 

Cheers,

 

Simon

 

PS - always good to see another red man on here. :thumbs:

www.myspace.com/boozlebear

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Steves reply as usual is spot on.

 

So many people choose the wrong hook size. I know match anglers who have never used a hook larger than 12.

 

Lobworms need at least a size 10 better still an 8 and sometimes a 6.

 

Roach will take a whole lobworm and will generally be good sized fish. The hook for them would be a light wire 10 or 8.

 

I struggle to find such a hook these days.

 

For chubb I prefer a heavy wire hook such as animal or a mustad wide gape special.

 

you hear people saying I am fishing for such and such species so I need so and so size hook. Thats rubbish the hook should be matched to the bait. The size wire of the hook is a balance between strength of quarry, snags and presentation.

 

The one thing you must remember is hooking a lob is probably best just through one end so it looks natural but you must sit on your hands and learn when to strike. For this it can be important to learn the different types of fish bites. This comes with practice. Strike to quick at a chubb and you will rarely catch one, to late at a perch and it will be deep hooked.

 

John

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