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#21 Steve Walker

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Posted 04 July 2018 - 09:30 AM

He had two safes, an alarm system, a CCTV system with about 8 cameras hooked up to a DVR box, multiple bolts on the doors. There's a downstairs window which is hidden from view and the obvious place to break in, that's the one with a locked grille on it. Wonder if he knew something about the area I don't? :lol: Mind you, his brother in law is an ex-copper, so maybe he scared him.

 

The problem with having that view is that at the moment I can see the mullet every low tide, I have had four goes at them now and about as many bites and no fish! They're driving me insane.



#22 chesters1

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Posted 04 July 2018 - 01:39 PM

He had two safes, an alarm system, a CCTV system with about 8 cameras hooked up to a DVR box, multiple bolts on the doors. There's a downstairs window which is hidden from view and the obvious place to break in, that's the one with a locked grille on it. Wonder if he knew something about the area I don't? :lol: Mind you, his brother in law is an ex-copper, so maybe he scared him.
 
The problem with having that view is that at the moment I can see the mullet every low tide, I have had four goes at them now and about as many bites and no fish! They're driving me insane.

CCTV is great you can watch your stuff getting nicked every night from the comfort of your settee if you wish,some have audible warnings if the motion sensor is tripped but ours gets confused by spiders and moths even on the lowest sensitivity so its disabled.
Any respecting burgler would come on a foggy night CCTV cameras are crap trying to see through it the droplets reflect the lights
As to the mullet i have never caught one ,catching a ghost in a net is easier in the limited times i have tried

Edited by chesters1, 04 July 2018 - 01:47 PM.

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#23 Phone

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Posted 04 July 2018 - 11:14 PM

Steve,

 

Do we have the same mullet as the UK?  They will eat anything that doesn't eat them first over here.The key to mullet fishing is patients and "small" bait. I mean really small even by UK standards.  In Florida I used shoepeg corn soaked in hot sauce because that is what I had.  A lot of anglers were using Berkley Big Gulp maggots.  Our mullet water is never clear, always cloudy.  Either they eat like pigs or there are a lot of them in one place.

 

Phone

 

Edit: I caught 3 or 4 in a couple hours.  It's insane why you can't catch 200 in that time frame - fish everywhere. I have to admit they were a blast.  However, I was fearful for harm to my "freshwater" kit and only fished that once.


Edited by Phone, 04 July 2018 - 11:18 PM.


#24 Steve Walker

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Posted 05 July 2018 - 08:41 AM

Phone, I think you have Mugil cephalus, and possibly some others. We have Chelon labrosus, Chelon ramada and Chelon auratus.  That's your flathead or striped mullet and our thick lipped, thin lipped and golden grey.

 

So, no, I don't think we have the same species, but the weird thing is that the same species we have here are hugely easier to catch in other parts of Europe. I caught them by the dozen on childhood holidays to the Mediterranean, which was as you say, a blast, yet those here are like ghosts. Very strange.



#25 gozzer

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Posted 05 July 2018 - 10:23 AM

Phone, I think you have Mugil cephalus, and possibly some others. We have Chelon labrosus, Chelon ramada and Chelon auratus.  That's your flathead or striped mullet and our thick lipped, thin lipped and golden grey.

 

So, no, I don't think we have the same species, but the weird thing is that the same species we have here are hugely easier to catch in other parts of Europe. I caught them by the dozen on childhood holidays to the Mediterranean, which was as you say, a blast, yet those here are like ghosts. Very strange.

 

 I spent many years trying to catch, even hook, the mullet in the Clyde estuary while visiting my in laws in Irvine. My hook up rate was very poor, and I only managed to land a couple of smaller ones. In fact during the hot summer of '75, I got to touch more without a rod. They were that numerous that at low water, hundreds of dorsal fins could be seen close into shore. Not being one for sunbathing, I used to wade out, (it's a very shallow, gentle sloping beach), and the fish would part, and swim behind me. I would lie on a lilo, and slowly drift towards a shoal, then slide off into the water, and try and catch them by hand. I never did anymore than touch the odd one. A few years later I was on holiday in Malta, and walking along a small stretch of jetty, saw a young lad fishing with a pole, fixed line, a bottle cork float, and what looked like bread paste. As I walked over he landed a fish of about a pound and a half. I asked him how he was doing, and he lifted a cloth from a large bucket, to reveal a dozen or so similar sized mullet. I watched him catch another half dozen, on the bread, and about a size 8 hook, before he packed up. He was fishing to supplement, the family diet, not for fun. I'd fished almost the same, a bit more refined, as him, and really struggled in Scotland, but this seemed more like fishing an overstocked commercial in comparison.

 I remember that the number of mullet around at that time caused the local angling club to change it's rules. They used to fish fly only matches, on their stretch of the river. The downstream stretch ended at a weir/dam that had a section cut out of the middle to allow the run of salmon and sea trout. One young angler fished just above this dam, at high tide, and landed nearly 20lb of mullet. The rule book only said fly only, and no salmon or sea trout, not a mention of mullet. He was awarded the match, but the rule book was soon amended.

 

John. 


Angling is more than just catching fish, if it wasn't it would just be called 'catching'......... John

#26 Andrew

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Posted 05 July 2018 - 10:43 AM

Ive attempted for many years to catch elusive Spanish salmonetes, but i have failed  :bye2:


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#27 Martin56

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 10:02 PM

Phone, I think you have Mugil cephalus, and possibly some others. We have Chelon labrosus, Chelon ramada and Chelon auratus.  That's your flathead or striped mullet and our thick lipped, thin lipped and golden grey.

 

So, no, I don't think we have the same species, but the weird thing is that the same species we have here are hugely easier to catch in other parts of Europe. I caught them by the dozen on childhood holidays to the Mediterranean, which was as you say, a blast, yet those here are like ghosts. Very strange.

I've heard of guys who are ready for a padded cell in their quest to catch mullet!!


Edited by Martin56, 06 July 2018 - 10:03 PM.

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#28 Vagabond

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Posted 08 July 2018 - 11:20 AM

Steve      I have caught mullet on fly on the ebb at several places. For West coast estuaries I use a small fiery brown or ginger fly #12     fished downstream, evening, ebb.   Concealment is important because the light is from the west, the fly shows well to the mullet , as does the angler.  One take per evening sounds about right,     Flounders and tiny bass one has to accept.    Never had much when fishing morning ebb with the light behind me.  (reminds one of W S Gilbert's "rich attorney's elderly ugly daughter"  who looked good in the dusk with the light behind her)      One thing I found that worked was holding the fly in the current and let it drift (but slower than the current) downtide

 

Good luck


Edited by Vagabond, 08 July 2018 - 05:55 PM.



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#29 Steve Walker

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 09:25 AM

Dave, I had two flies on, a little shrimp pattern and the one I caught the flounder on. I'm not sure which one I briefly hooked a mullet on, though. These fish do not seem at all spooky - could be that I am well hidden against the banks with the sun below the horizon. I think I will have another go this evening, but I fear the evening low tide is now a little too late to fish.



#30 chesters1

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 05:41 PM

I walked for a couple of hundred yards with the usual bread ,no sign of anything that didnt look like trout ,all i got was nettle rash bramble scratches and probably lyme disease!

Believe NOTHING anyones says or writes unless you witness  it yourself and even then your eyes can deceive you

 

There is only one opinion i listen to ,its mine and its ALWAYS right even when its wrong

 

Its far easier to curse the darkness than light one candle

 

Mathew 4:19

 

"To compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves and abhors, is sinful and tyrannical." Thomas Jefferson