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Also clatters into the tip ring if you aren't careful!

At least one useful item has been produced by the mighty carp tackle industry - small rubber beads, one of which placed upline of the swivel stops damage to my nice agate tip rings which adorn my nice split-bamboo light spinning rods.

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RNLI Governor

 

World species 471 : UK species 105 : English species 95 .

Certhia's world species - 215

Eclectic "husband and wife combined" world species 501

 

"Nothing matters very much, few things matter at all" - Plato

...only things like fresh bait and cold beer...

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Dear John,   I sent you a text message, feel free to just give me a call if you want to come along with me one day or to have a chat about tactics etc, its too much to write here! My next trip to Ru

Hi John, hope you’re well.   All you need to know about fishing Rutland is here;   http://www.anglersnet.co.uk/forums/index.php?/topic/5975726-zander-fish-in-october/?hl=rutland   And here;  

All,   Isn't there a topographical map of this venue? Walleye are not "opportunistic" feeders. They have a plan that involves hiding and executing an attack.   FWIW, I jig much slower and a short

Steve,

 

See, point well taken. You mention 40 - 90 ft. I have NEVER fished for walleye (zander) anywhere near that depth.

 

The yellow perch, walleye, and sauger are major sport fish that are considered "warm water" predators. Those depths simply don't occur to us as target areas.

 

Phone

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Interesting article on walleye at depth here, where the author makes exactly your point;

 

https://ontariofishingnetwork.com/2012/fishing-for-walleye-in-deep-water/

 

I think the situation at Rutland may be a bit peculiar in that you aren’t allowed to fish for them except in the autumn and winter, you are restricted at dawn and dusk by opening times and the shallows are not extensive and fairly barren. There are masses of small fish in the shallows but there are also lots of pike. So I suspect the zander spend the daytime in the deeps, eating each other, and only come into the shallows to feed after all the boats have docked.

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Wow! Thank you everyone for extremely helpful comments. I'm a bit daunted as there is obviously more to it that I was thinking, but I shall have a go. Steve - that video! I had already looked at part of it but never noticed it featured AN friends.

 

One remaining question. How good is the tackle shop? Can I leave it to get lures, rigs and any deadbaits on the day? By the way, those jigheads with stinger attached - I assume you can buy them, or do I need to make them up?

john clarke

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Tackle shop wasnt bad as I remember, but probably a lot cheaper to buy online. I always made the stingers up myself. Not too difficult. When they allowed trebles, I just tied one to a bit of heavy braid and made a tiny loop on the other end that would fit snugly over the eye of the jighead. With singles, same thing, but with a small bead to stop the hook pulling into the lure and a baiting needle to thread the line through the soft plastic.

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Rules clarified by the tackle shop John,

 

Jig head hook must be barbless, treble hook stinger allowed but only the point going into the lure can have a barb, the two protruding hooks must have their barbs squashed. That's good, my kit will be ok.

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It's never a 'six', let's put it back

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Oh, I've just remembered the other thing I did with the stinger - I put a little piece of silicone tubing on it to help snug the loop up to the eye of the jig.

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Just looking at the comments about swivels and tip rings...
Are you using wire or mono/fluoro as a leader?

If it's not wire, just use a uni knot to join the mainline to the leader.

Species caught in 2020: Barbel. European Eel. Bleak. Perch. Pike.

Species caught in 2019: Pike. Bream. Tench. Chub. Common Carp. European Eel. Barbel. Bleak. Dace.

Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullien's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.

Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub.

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