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Long disgorger


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#1 The Flying Tench

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Posted 11 May 2019 - 01:40 PM

I caught a carp (low double) yesterday that swallowed the hook right down. Size 14 barbless, but it could have been a bigger hook on another day. I always have a small disgorger, mainly for little fish, and forceps for larger hooks/fish. The hook was too deep, so I cut the line reckoning the carp could probably throw the hook.

But someone there said you should always have a very long disgorger as you can then get the hook out even if it's gone right down into the stomach.

Hmm, I am not sure it would have worked, and it's the first time it's ever happened with a carp, so I'm inclined to ignore the advice. But I'd be interested in the view of others on A.N.


john clarke

#2 Ken L

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Posted 11 May 2019 - 04:42 PM

There is a type of disgorger that has a cone on the end. it does need to be used carefully but it will allow you to remove hooks that you can't see and withdraw them without re-hooking or cutting the fish's throat on the way out.
I normally use the type that locks on the line but do carry one of the cone type.

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Species caught in 2019: Pike. Bream. Tench.

Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.
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Species caught in 2014: Striped catfish. Pacu. Giant gourami. Clown knife fish. Rohu. Siamese carp. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Roach. Bream. Perch. Rainbow trout. Chub. Common Carp, Ide. Brown Trout. Barbel. Mekong catfish. Jullien's golden carp. Alligator gar. Java barb.
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#3 philocalist

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Posted 11 May 2019 - 07:42 PM

Personally, if a fish is hooked so deeply that a disgorger and forcep are not enough to effect removal, Id cut the line as far down as was safely possible, then return the fish as quickly as I could with the minimum of fuss. Most hooks commonly used in freshwater fishing within the UK will quickly corrode and disintegrate in water within a few days - more quickly when being attacked by various bodily fluids / digestive acids within a fish. Digging about down there ()in the stomach?) is only goiung to cause trauma and possibly further injury.

The exception to this would be a deeply hooked pike on trebles, which may otherwise 'stitch' the throat closed, or close off the stomach. It IS possible to very, very carefully pull out the stomach of a pike to effect removal - apparently - then return the fish, though in more than 40 years of catching pike, I've never hooked one that deep, nor seen the procedure completed.



#4 wotnobivvy

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Posted 11 May 2019 - 07:43 PM

I would always play safe and cut the line. You don't know where the hook has got to and poking around will do more harm than good


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#5 Phone

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Posted 11 May 2019 - 10:31 PM

Tench

 

The first mention of the use of steel to make hooks is in The Treatyse of Fishing with an Angle, published in London in 1496. http://www.fishingmu...s_overview.html You will enjoy reading this bit if you haven’t already.

 

 

Here is your answer:  https://www.fishings...hooks-dissolve/

I’ll give you the short version if you don’t want to read the article above. – nope, Nope, NOPE

 

I have a few hooks that DO dissolve and tried to use them exclusively in the 1970’s.  Looking back I believe I was foolish.

 

They are fish – GET OVER IT !

 

Phone

 

Disclaimer: carp, among fishes dissolve metal objects "better" than predatory fishes. I can dig the information out but it would be useless.  You can no longer buy the "fish friendly" hooks of that era.



#6 Phone

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Posted 11 May 2019 - 10:36 PM

Tench,

 

Just realized I didn't answer your question.

 

Long before a hook is lodged in the carp's stomach - it passes eleventeen vital organs. CUT the line.  The fish will die out of sight and save you the trauma of disemboweling it on the bank.

 

Phone 



#7 gozzer

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Posted 12 May 2019 - 01:24 PM

I think I might have posted this before, if so, apologies.  It's a study done mainly on Northern pike in the US, but it provides food for thought, and is in line with my personal beliefs on the subject.

 

https://www.saltstro...-a-fishs-mouth/

 

As to my thoughts on your question John, I wouldn't worry about it, I would have done the same as you. It's a pretty small hook anyway, and leaving it in is likely to result in less damage than poking about inside the fish, whatever device you use.

 

John


Angling is more than just catching fish, if it wasn't it would just be called 'catching'......... John

#8 Martin56

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Posted 12 May 2019 - 08:09 PM

I use conventional disgorgers & curved forceps 99% of the time but occasionally I'll use one of those long wooden coffee stirrers from the coffee shops (thinned down with a simple deep "VEE" cut in the business end)

 

Keep the line tight & feel/look for the hook bend with the "VEE". Doesn't work every time but it is another tool worth trying, & at least ones view down the fish's throat is less obscured.

 

I always shove a few stirrers from Gregg's in my pocket should I buy a cuppa'.


Edited by Martin56, 12 May 2019 - 08:24 PM.

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#9 Martin56

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Posted 12 May 2019 - 09:04 PM

Don't you just love it when the hook has come out in the landing net - Now't to do!!!

 

I've had days when that's happened most of the time.

 

Could that be because I'm Hair Rigging for Carp - therefore very rarely deep hooking??


Edited by Martin56, 12 May 2019 - 09:12 PM.

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#10 Phone

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 01:17 PM

Tench,

 

I might mention one other idea that seems to work very well in the US.  Many American C&R carp anglers who fish for carp using European style setups have gone to circle hooks (down to about 14 at the extreme).  IMO they have shown some benefits without any sacrifice.  I would only use a circle for carp on self hooking rigs, i.e. bolt rigs.

 

Phone

 

Edit: technically the action of a circle hook makes perfect sense for bolt rigs.


Edited by Phone, 13 May 2019 - 01:18 PM.