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#1 Mikench

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Posted 03 October 2019 - 09:31 AM

Are back leads and flying back leads the same and what make and size are recommended? The ones I've seen seem to either stay on the line running down to the feeder or weight presumably, or are jettisoned if snagged. I have never used them but may be missing out.

#2 Tigger

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Posted 03 October 2019 - 11:17 AM


Flying backleads are fixed on your line Mike, they are made to slide back on your line when casting. They don't keep your line pinned to the bottom from your rod tip, the ones we talked of are captive, so are fixed to your rod rest or the baking somehow.

#3 Cameraman

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Posted 03 October 2019 - 11:47 AM

You can attach a back lead after casting out and setting up your rod(s). Just pull a little slack from the tip, clip on and drop into the water below the tip. Tighten up, or slack line as you would normally. The line is kept down and in theory liners are eliminated. They can also help by keeping your line down on your 2nd or 3rd rod when playing another fish close in. On the strike they run down the line joining your other lead. They are safe as the loop to attach them is normally around thumb nail size. The weight is normally irrelevant unless you're fishing running water and they are in the current. They only need to be heavy enough to comfortably sink the line and not move.
If all else fails, follow the intructions.

#4 Mikench

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Posted 03 October 2019 - 02:02 PM

Thanks for that. What are dogs nut back leads and are they legal.

So you get them back then?

#5 Tigger

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Posted 03 October 2019 - 02:56 PM


Mike, the ones I have are fox and gardner. The fox version has a gate on it and comes with a luminous length of nylon cord and the gardner version have a screw up pincer type line grip so you can alter it to suite the thickness of line your using. You have to add your own cord to the gardner ones.
You can get various sizes/weights to suite the type of venue your fishing. Obviously rivers may need heavier ones to combat the flow.
Both makes are on ebay and for what they are they're way overpriced!

#6 Mikench

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Posted 03 October 2019 - 04:34 PM

Cheers Ian, I'll have a look at both. An omission in my array of Tackle dearie me.!!!!!

#7 Tigger

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Posted 03 October 2019 - 05:10 PM


Thing is, you may never use them, and they arn't cheap. I haven't used mine for about 2yrs!
Last time I used them I was using two rods at once and catching some quite powerful tench. I used them to prevent any fish from snagging up my other line.
If your only using one rod then they aren't really needed, unles on a river in conditions we talked of.

#8 Cameraman

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Posted 03 October 2019 - 05:19 PM

Something like this:

https://rover.ebay.c...tm/153026228978

But as previously said they are grossly overpriced, mine cost a fraction of that, but I've had them ages.
If all else fails, follow the intructions.

#9 Tigger

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Posted 03 October 2019 - 06:28 PM


I found I lost the ones that stay on your line very easily. I also disliked having the extra weight on my line when playing a fish.
Imo the captive leads are much better, I know they're expensive, but in the not too long a run they will work out cheaper due to not losing them.

#10 Phone

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Posted 03 October 2019 - 06:38 PM

Mike,

 

Until you find an "ultimate" need they are a "FIX" for which there is no problem.

 

With expensive lures similar products are intended to release a snagged lure.  There are, mostly for wild carp, conditions where fluorocarbon is the "best" line.  For example,  I like the new fluorocarbons when fishing below 80ft using a popup back up to the thermocline.

 

Phone

PS: the loss of sensitivity is not worth the risk in situations Possibility of light biting fish 

 

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