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Can Triploid Rainbows Produce Eggs?


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Probably wrong forum - but at least it will get seen here! Caught a nuisance Rainbow Trout today on the Kennet and it shed a load of eggs in the net - which somewhat surprised me as I thought that these stockies - which I'm sure it was - are meant to be sterile Triploids! How are they sterilised - and is it fool -proof?

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Chris, 

No.  If you see eggs the fish is diploid. (They usually breed with another failed triploid)

Female fry, which have an XX chromosome complement, are changed into morphological males by feeding them male hormones.

Eggs are gently squeezed from a female rainbow trout. These eggs each contain two sets of chromosomes, at this time.

The eggs are fertilized with the sperm collected earlier. After a brief moment, the eggs are then gently rinsed to remove excess sperm and bacteria.

Exactly twenty minutes after fertilization, eggs are placed in a warm water bath maintained at 26°C (79°F) for 20 minutes. (this step gets techy) 
 
After a warm bath, the egg trays are placed in stacks for incubation. After several weeks the eggs develop into fry.
 
The groups of fish are certified for their levels of tripoidy before being released.
 
The fry are placed into rearing tanks, and grow into fingerlings, which are released into lakes and streams. Because the fish are mature sexually they will not interbreed with wild rainbow trout
 
producing triploids can result in a low number of fish that are diploid
 
This is the same for grass carp which must be stocked as triploids in the United States. (maybe?)
 
Phone
 
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Maybe the fish still produce eggs but they may not be able to be fertilised?   Maybe some are fertile?

I know i'm talking totally different creatures below but I think the answer may well be the same with fish.

A horse over donkey is a hinny, a donkey over a horse is known as a mule.  They where always thought to be sterile and most of them are, but some are fertile and produce offspring.

Some birds such as a canary x goldie are also called mules and as with the bovines some of them are also fertile.

No idea how true it is but i've heard rumours that F1's have also produced offspring.

 

 

Edited by Tigger
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All,

 

 F1 Carp which are a hybrid of common carp and crucian carp. While this cross breeding can occur naturally in the wild. Not even close to the same thing as the manipulation in the thread.

Triploid fish do not produce eggs.

Mules are sterile because horse and donkey chromosomes are just too different. But they are alive because horse and donkey chromosomes are similar enough to mate.  Never fertile. The extra chromosomes in the horse do not interfere with the donkeys ability to survive.  In most animals this imbalance causes miscarriage (humans) 

I don't know anything about birds and bovine

Phone

 

Edited by Phone
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1 hour ago, Phone said:

All,

 

 F1 Carp which are a hybrid of common carp and crucian carp. While this cross breeding can occur naturally in the wild. Not even close to the same thing as the manipulation in the thread.

Triploid fish do not produce eggs.

Mules are sterile because horse and donkey chromosomes are just too different. But they are alive because horse and donkey chromosomes are similar enough to mate.  Never fertile. The extra chromosomes in the horse do not interfere with the donkeys ability to survive.  In most animals this imbalance causes miscarriage (humans) 

I don't know anything about birds and bovine

Phone

 

Mules do occasionally reproduce. It is on historical record. However it has always been very rare.

Quick google found this. Plenty other links

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3378453

 

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Female Ligers & Tigrons are fertile & can be mated with male Lions & Tigers to produce Lilligers & Tilligers according to the Net, but there is no record of male Ligers & Tigrons successfully Siring offspring. (That's not to say they are not averse to a bit of leg over all the same??)

Edited by Martin56

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All,

Tigger, Mule to mule can, as distant occurrences, produce hybrid foal which is always female, but horse to mule or mule to horse, to my knowledge hasn't happened (I could be wrong?) "loids"and mutations are types of mutation.

I only know Telly stuff about hybrid big cats.

You want to get real fancy do the chromosomes for color in a dog.

Phone 

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Phone,

As far as I know all stallion  mules/hinnys are infertile, it's the females that have produced foals when mated to either a donkey or horse.

 

 

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  • 3 months later...
On 1/10/2020 at 5:21 PM, Chris Plumb said:

Probably wrong forum - but at least it will get seen here! Caught a nuisance Rainbow Trout today on the Kennet and it shed a load of eggs in the net - which somewhat surprised me as I thought that these stockies - which I'm sure it was - are meant to be sterile Triploids! How are they sterilised - and is it fool -proof?

Chris was that from the Lamb Stream ? 
I had one around the same time dripping eggs 

We are not putting it back it is a lump now put that curry down and go and get the scales

have I told you abouit the cruise control on my Volvo ,,,,,,,bla bla bla Barder rod has it come yet?? and don`t even start me on Chris Lythe :bleh::icecream:

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