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I have built up two micro climates, one under the mango tree and the other, under the macadamia tree. The Macadamia one 'houses' my phalaenopsis collection, plus a few dendrobiums and cattleyas among a few ferns. Th white orchid at the bottom, is the uncommon variety of cattleya skinneri, the common variety being mauve.

Orchids.thumb.jpeg.026790f89c11219d127995045a56f5ba.jpeg

 

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Cheers, Bobj.

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An outside greenhouse lol

Surprisingly easy to find nowadays even in supermarkets long gone is the specialist collector only lable they had 50 years ago

I always hankered for a bug eating plant collection but my initial venus fly trap died of exhaustion  with the kids triggering it closed as soon as it reopened

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Believe NOTHING anyones says or writes unless you witness it yourself and even then your eyes can deceive you

 

There is only one opinion i listen to ,its mine and its ALWAYS right even when its wrong

 

Its far easier to curse the darkness than light one candle

 

Mathew 4:19

Grangers law : anything i say will  turn out the opposite or not happen at all!

 

"To compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves and abhors, is sinful and tyrannical." Thomas Jefferson

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As you say, many, many varieties, thanks to cheap mericloning. Very rare to see species orchids in supermarkets, but still available in some orchid nurseries. When I started my collection 21 years ago, I sought out as many species orchids as my retirement funds would allow; they are mainly dendrobiums.

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Cheers, Bobj.

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9 hours ago, chesters1 said:

An outside greenhouse lol

Surprisingly easy to find nowadays even in supermarkets long gone is the specialist collector only lable they had 50 years ago

I always hankered for a bug eating plant collection but my initial venus fly trap died of exhaustion  with the kids triggering it closed as soon as it reopened

You need the world's largest carnivorous plant - a blackberry. They catch sheep

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Species caught in 2020: Barbel. European Eel. Bleak. Perch. Pike.

Species caught in 2019: Pike. Bream. Tench. Chub. Common Carp. European Eel. Barbel. Bleak. Dace.

Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullien's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.

Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub.

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How dare you snigger...

 

Species caught in 2020: Barbel. European Eel. Bleak. Perch. Pike.

Species caught in 2019: Pike. Bream. Tench. Chub. Common Carp. European Eel. Barbel. Bleak. Dace.

Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullien's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.

Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub.

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Seen it myself lol

Believe NOTHING anyones says or writes unless you witness it yourself and even then your eyes can deceive you

 

There is only one opinion i listen to ,its mine and its ALWAYS right even when its wrong

 

Its far easier to curse the darkness than light one candle

 

Mathew 4:19

Grangers law : anything i say will  turn out the opposite or not happen at all!

 

"To compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves and abhors, is sinful and tyrannical." Thomas Jefferson

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Bobj,

I'M a sucker for these families of beauty. OK - you're going to figure out the question (I'm not knowledgeable enough to ask properly)

What is your ambient or relative humidity? How do you maintain humidity in your patch. Isn't that enormously critical?

My great grandmother (born 19th century) is long past but as a child I remember she had a variety of (gulp SP)  CYPRIPEDIUMS sp checker maybe to the rescue.

I was mesmerized 

Phone

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10 hours ago, Phone said:

Bobj,

I'M a sucker for these families of beauty. OK - you're going to figure out the question (I'm not knowledgeable enough to ask properly)

What is your ambient or relative humidity? How do you maintain humidity in your patch. Isn't that enormously critical?

My great grandmother (born 19th century) is long past but as a child I remember she had a variety of (gulp SP)  CYPRIPEDIUMS sp checker maybe to the rescue.

I was mesmerized 

Phone

Where I live, @Phone,in the Whitsunday Region, the ambient relative humidity is 60-65%during “the dry” and 70-99% during “the wet”, January to March.

If an orchid is in a pot filled with soil, it needs watering at least once a week, if an orchid is grown on a log, its roots absorb moisture from the atmosphere and only needs watering once every couple of months...IF it has 75% shade. 
An old bloke on the front house on our beach, has a cooktown orchid on his fence in full daylight and it thrives just on the sea breezes.

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Cheers, Bobj.

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12 hours ago, Ken L said:

You need the world's largest carnivorous plant - a blackberry. They catch sheep

They don’t catch wild pigs, though. Blackberry ‘jungles’ abound in the New England Region of NSW and harbour pigs. Seen it many times whilst trout fishing along the upper reaches of the Macintyre River.

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Cheers, Bobj.

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Hi Bobj    We have a range of orchids indoors.   Cymbidiums, Cattleya, Masdevallia, Odontoglossums, Oncidiums, Paphiopedilums, Phalaenopsis and Dendrobium.       All flower regularly except the Dendrobiums, all three of which flowered once, two years ago, but nothing since.

Have followed what the books say re watering, humidity, temperature, light etc, but they show no sign of flowering.  Good healthy new growth but no flower buds.   We must be missing something, Dendrobia are supposed to be easy to grow and flower.   Any comment ?

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RNLI Governor

 

World species 471 : UK species 105 : English species 95 .

Certhia's world species - 215

Eclectic "husband and wife combined" world species 501

 

"Nothing matters very much, few things matter at all" - Plato

...only things like fresh bait and cold beer...

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