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Do lily pads attract fish all the time?


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As I understand it, in summer in the daytime, lily pads attract fish for at least 3 reasons: cover, oxyen is given out, and the insect life is a source of food. At night the cover is not needed, oxygen is actually taken from the water, and the insects are not visible. So I assume fish leave the lily pads?

But what about in winter? The pads mostly die away, but do the fish stick around?

And what about a time like this? I assume like summer, but less so?

john clarke

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Saratoga under lily pads, heaven in Coroborree  Billabong  in the Mary River, Northern Territory!

ocker-anim.gifROO.gif

 

 

Cheers, Bobj.

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TENCH,

Fish are like grizzly bears- they hibernate during the winter.  they are no doubt there BUT - But - but? 

Also, I know there are two different kinds of water lilies, maybe more (?). Someone other than me will touch on the tropical ones.

Phone

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Like humans feeding birds do they actually cause harm in the long run i have long wondered if winter fishing harms fish in the long run? (Carp excused)

Look at it this way : if you catch a fish it uses a lot of energy fighting which it recoups feeding on whatevers available swimming past  until its fully recovered and back to 'normal'

BUT if you catch one in the winter it uses the exact same energy but theres little or no food available to recoup the lost weight and energy ,what happens ? I think fish go into winter with just enough stored fat (or whatever the energy source is?) To last through winter so is catching them doing little more than killing them?

With climate change winters are not as hard as they used to be but i have never seen daphnia in the winter ,the lillies are gone and the weed aswell so i presume the food disapears and over wintering eggs replace them in the spring ?

I suppose in carp infested lakes theres always boilies sitting about for fish to nibble at but in carp free lakes where piles of rotting boilies are not available times would be hard for recently caught fish? Predators like pike and perch should be fine they use more energy digesting the food than hunting them and prey is slow moving in the winter so they are fine but its the mid water feeders that maybe most effected 

Unfortunately humans only look for what they want to see or short term views like breeding dogs for pointless short restricted lives so they can think they are being nice to the animals (not breeding them at all would be far kinder) or keeping birds in cages so they can enjoy their unnatural captivity (must be a life of hell not flying about ) ,unfortunately the effect on the animal itself is rarely taken into consideration  so are anglers fishes worst enemies even when we dont eat them?

Has anyone noticed the more we 'look after' fish the fewer there are? In fish eating countries they appear to be teeming with fish

Edited by chesters1

Believe NOTHING anyones says or writes unless you witness it yourself and even then your eyes can deceive you

None of this "the enemy of my enemy is my friend" crap it just means i have at least two enemies!

 

There is only one opinion i listen to ,its mine and its ALWAYS right even when its wrong

 

Its far easier to curse the darkness than light one candle

 

Mathew 4:19

Grangers law : anything i say will  turn out the opposite or not happen at all!

 

"To compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves and abhors, is sinful and tyrannical." Thomas Jefferson

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Chesters1,

Let me get you a tree to hug.

I THINK you are right on target. PROBLEM is we just don't often have those circumstances over here. As a general statement winter C&R morality is roughly 12% in the U S.  IMO totally arbitrary but totals are probably close. 

We really don't know the science very well since so many other factors are or could be involved beside the fish being caught and released.

Phone

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And they after all are just fish which will be their downfall ,one bit of fur or feather

and angling would have been banned decades ago

Edited by chesters1
  • Like 1

Believe NOTHING anyones says or writes unless you witness it yourself and even then your eyes can deceive you

None of this "the enemy of my enemy is my friend" crap it just means i have at least two enemies!

 

There is only one opinion i listen to ,its mine and its ALWAYS right even when its wrong

 

Its far easier to curse the darkness than light one candle

 

Mathew 4:19

Grangers law : anything i say will  turn out the opposite or not happen at all!

 

"To compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves and abhors, is sinful and tyrannical." Thomas Jefferson

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Do Lilly pads still attract fish in the winter?

I’ve always found that the fish that I normally catch close to lilly beds in the waters that I fish start to be caught away from the decaying lilly Beds once they have started to decay.

In my experience once they start to die off in the late Autumn and the leaves are turning brown and start disappearing they definately don’t have the same attraction to the fish that fed off the snails eggs and insects and larvae that were amongst the leaves and roots during the warmer months, neither do they afford the same amount of cover from the sun either.

Plus they start to emit the ‘stench’ of decay as the leaves and stems start to rot away which is probably one of the reasons why the fish in places that I fish tend to keep away from them at this time of year.

Pike still inhabit the remains of the Lilly pads though for obvious reasons. 🙂

Keith

Edited by BoldBear

Happiness is Fish shaped (it used to be woman shaped but the wife is getting on a bit now)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Typically, lilies grow in less than 1m of water.

I'll be looking for more than 1m of water in the cold.

Species caught in 2020: Barbel. European Eel. Bleak. Perch. Pike.

Species caught in 2019: Pike. Bream. Tench. Chub. Common Carp. European Eel. Barbel. Bleak. Dace.

Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullien's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.

Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub.

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Just done 3 six hour sessions (last 3 Wednesdays) just one bite which I missed!!

Going again Tom' with red maggots hoping for a change of luck!!

Fishin' - "Best Fun Ya' can 'ave wi' Ya' Clothes On"!!

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