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Guest Mick M

Flies or Lures

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Guest Mick M

Help please, advice on which is best. Floating or sinking

 

Thanks Mick.

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Guest Spiderfan

Mick,

 

They reckon that 80% of food a trout eats is sub-surface; nymphs, shrimps, bloodworms etc. leaving the other 20% for stuff that gets trapped in or blown onto the surface. Therefore, odds suggest you go deep. However, I like fishing on the top, being able to see a fish approach and take the fly, much more than hope you're dragging something past a trout's nose in the hope that it will have a go.

 

It's a personal thing.

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Guest Colin Brett

Originally posted by Mick M:

Help please, advice on which is best. Floating or sinking

 

Thanks Mick.

What area are you in Mick? I would suggest joining a Fly fishing club. You will find Fly fishers very helpful! Myself, I fish Floaters and sinkers, sinkers tend to be used early season, but floaters will catch with deep nypmhs, you may catch the odd fish off the top but this tends to be a more summer method.

 

Good luck,

 

Colin

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Guest Mick M

Originally posted by Spiderfan:

Mick,

 

They reckon that 80% of food a trout eats is sub-surface; nymphs, shrimps, bloodworms etc. leaving the other 20% for stuff that gets trapped in or blown onto the surface. Therefore, odds suggest you go deep. However, I like fishing on the top, being able to see a fish approach and take the fly, much more than hope you're dragging something past a trout's nose in the hope that it will have a go.

 

It's a personal thing.

Cheers spiderfan.

new to this type of angling, silly question maybe, please explain the difference between flies and lures.

Do you get floaters in both typs.

Thanks again.

 

 

------------------

Mick M

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Guest Mick M

Originally posted by Colin Brett:

What area are you in Mick?  I would suggest joining a Fly fishing club.  You will find Fly fishers very helpful!  Myself, I fish Floaters and sinkers, sinkers tend to be used early season, but floaters will catch with deep nypmhs, you may catch the odd fish off the top but this tends to be a more summer method.

 

Good luck,

 

Colin

 

Thanks for the info Colin as I said to spiderfan new to this.

I'm in the west midlands, closest venue Packington Fisheries.

Hope you dont mind , what type of line, have been recomended DTWF7Floating, Rod is Leeda 6/8

 

 

 

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Mick M

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Guest Spiderfan

Hi Mick,

 

When is a fly a fly and a lure a lure? It’s a good question and there’s no definitive answer I’m afraid. My interpretation is that a ‘fly’ imitates a food item, generally of insect origin, while a ‘lure’ relies on the annoyance factor and the natural aggression of a fish for it to bite.

Saying that, there’s a grey area inbetween such that some ‘lures’ vaguely imitate damsel nymphs, for example, but that same vagueness goes for a lot of ‘flies’ too. ‘Flies’ rely heavily on colour, shape and size to fool the fish on a slow, steady retrieve while ‘lures’ largely depend upon a fast strip to impart action on the materials used in order for them to induce a take. ‘Lures’ also incorporate synthetic materials like flashabou and tinsel to a larger degree to enhance their visual properties, and mechanical devices like tinheads to give a particular action to it as it is retrieved.

As a further generalisation, ‘flies’ tend to be used to tempt wild fish and ‘lures’ for the stockies, though either will catch both.

 

And yes, ‘flies’ and ‘lures’ come in both surface and sub-surface patterns which all adds to the fascination I have for the sport. Horses for courses, as they say elsewhere, and all part of the learning curve!

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Guest Mick M

Originally posted by Spiderfan:

Hi Mick,

 

When is a fly a fly and a lure a lure? It’s a good question and there’s no definitive answer I’m afraid. My interpretation is that a ‘fly’ imitates a food item, generally of insect origin, while a ‘lure’ relies on the annoyance factor and the natural aggression of a fish for it to bite.

Saying that, there’s a grey area inbetween such that some ‘lures’ vaguely imitate damsel nymphs, for example, but that same vagueness goes for a lot of ‘flies’ too. ‘Flies’ rely heavily on colour, shape and size to fool the fish on a slow, steady retrieve while ‘lures’ largely depend upon a fast strip to impart action on the materials used in order for them to induce a take. ‘Lures’ also incorporate synthetic materials like flashabou and tinsel to a larger degree to enhance their visual properties, and mechanical devices like tinheads to give a particular action to it as it is retrieved.

As a further generalisation, ‘flies’ tend to be used to tempt wild fish and ‘lures’ for the stockies, though either will catch both.

 

And yes, ‘flies’ and ‘lures’ come in both surface and sub-surface patterns which all adds to the fascination I have for the sport. Horses for courses, as they say elsewhere, and all part of the learning curve!

 

Cheers spidafan

Clear as mud.......

 

Not realy, The Mud is slowly clearing, next Question (hope you dont mind), comments on leader loops or needle knots,

Thanks again,

 

 

------------------

Mick M

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Guest Spiderfan

I've never tied a needle knot in my life! I use a tucked blood knot to attach the leader to a braided loop on the end of the flyline. If you intend to use loop to loop, making it 'easier' to change leaders, you'll need some fine-bore tubing to cover the connection to prevent 'hingeing'(?) which inhibits turnover.

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Guest Mick M

Originally posted by Spiderfan:

I've never tied a needle knot in my life! I use a tucked blood knot to attach the leader to a braided loop on the end of the flyline. If you intend to use loop to loop, making it 'easier' to change leaders, you'll need some fine-bore tubing to cover the connection to prevent 'hingeing'(?) which inhibits turnover.

 

Cheers Spiderfan ....... Such a lot to pick up

 

 

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Mick M

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