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Starting Fly-fishing


Guest Jonty

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Guest Jonty

I wonder if I could call on the experience of other anglers who are already established fly-fishers.

 

I will soon have completed 25 years service with my current employer (also 25 years service with my current wife, but that's another tale!!), and company policy is to allow us `old retainers` to purchase something we would like to have (basically whatever and from wherever) up to a certain value (currently £150.00) - we then claim the monies back via expenses.

 

I have been trying to think for a while of something to treat myself to, but had never though about fly-fishing (I am a coarse angler - those who know me well might say VERY coarse) until my nephew decided that he might like to try his hand at it next year.

That made me also think about it.

 

What I would like to know is, what weight rod would you recommend for someone like myself ?? - not pounds and ounces weight, but line weight. I am thinking more of fishing streams, smaller rivers and stillwaters rather than big reservoirs and powerful rivers - waters like the Rivers Dane and Dove, Upper Severn and Vyrnwy, Hamps and Henmore. I live in Cheddleton, Staffs, and am a member of PAAS, so any-one who is also a PAAS member will know what sort of waters I am thinking about.

 

Most of these are small rivers, and so I was thinking of a rod length of 8'6" to 9', with a line weight of 6/7 - would this be suitable ?? - I shall be very grateful for any and all advice

 

thanks

 

Jonty

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Guest Steve Burke

Hi Jonty,

 

I haven't fished the waters you have in mind but have walked one or two stretches and would suggest a 5/6 weight rod. This will throw a weight forward 6 very nicely or alternatively a double taper 5 although I'm not a fan of such lines. Personally I'd choose a 9 footer unless fishing overgrown waters. However one small point to bear in mind is that you may find such a rod can't be hidden in the boot of your car, which is useful for short after work sessions - one of the joys of fly fishing.

 

------------------

Wingham Fisheries

www.anglersnet.co.uk/fisheries/wingham.htm

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Guest Nobrott

Hi Jonty,

 

Got to agree with Steve there on the line weight of the rod - it's much more exciting to catch an 8 oz wild brownie on a light rod than a long distance reservoir chucker.

 

I would, however, be inclined to go for an 8 ft 6 in version - or even 8 ft - if you are going to concentrate on small streams.

 

In the price range you're looking at, there will be a significant difference in weight and 'feel' between a nine-footer and an 8 ft 6 in rod.

 

And on the subject of compact rods, if you can find one, Shimano do a wonderful six piece 'smuggler' version of the Symetre. It's a 9-footer, but beautifully light and sensitive. You'll be able to get that in your briefcase - I did!

 

Tigh (fly)lines

 

Mark

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Guest Steve Burke

Mark's right that an 8ft 6ins rod or smaller is best if you're going to fish just small streams. However the chances are you'll also end up fishing lakes as well when the 9 footer will come in handy. It really comes down to where you reckon you'll be fishing and how many rods you want or can afford to own.

 

As far as brands are concerned I can personally recommend Grey's who are now part of Hardy's. You get Hardy quality without Hardy prices.

 

However go and visit a tackle shop where the staff actually go fly fishing - most do not. Make sure that you like the feel of the rod and choose one with a non-flash finish - very important for wild trout.

 

------------------

Wingham Fisheries

www.anglersnet.co.uk/fisheries/wingham.htm

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Guest MikeConnor
Originally posted by Jonty:

I wonder if I could call on the experience of other anglers who are already established fly-fishers.

 

I would go for a nine foot five weight rod for this purpose. You can get some nice ones relatively cheaply. Daiwa does some fairly good ones. For that money you should be able to get more or less the full kit. If you intend to fish a lake occasionally, then you might be better off with a nine foot six weight, otherwise go with the five.

 

Tight lines !

 

Mike Connor

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Guest john

hi john,we have discussed the dove before.if i were you i would drive over to bakewell and visit the fly fishing shop the man in there is very helpful and will kit you out without ripping you off.bakewell is worth a visit just to see the trout in the wye!cheers

john arkwright

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest the generalist

hi jonty. i'm also in paas so i know the waters you mention well.the hamps req's a small brook rod about no 4 weight,short as poss due to tree canopy especially downstream of road.for the dove(doveridge)& the severn i prefer a no.6/7.longish rod to assist lifting over currents etc,so unfortunately you need more than one rod.if i had to buy one only i'd go for the 6/7. & make do as best as you can.you can then use it for coarse fish to. doveridge offers great sport for chub,grayling & dace.the derwent is great to but avoid in high season due to campsite opp'.why not make one up from a blank to get some experience & see if you get into it first.

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