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Guest shamrock

Are Fish Colourblind?

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Guest shamrock
Originally posted by Newt:

Ahhh Shamrock - but being colour blind is not "anti-survival" for humans in this day and age - except for driving (traffic lights) and sea boating (to tell the location and direction of another boat).  Even then, you only need red-green colour vision which is the least likely to be lost.  I think only a very small fraction of people who are colour blind are completely so.

 

If fish need colour vision to compete for food and to stay safe, I doubt that many colour blind fish would live to breeding age.

 

Edit note:  You folk should be proud of this Yank.  I mis-spelled color every time to match up with your strange notion of how it should be spelt.    biggrin.gif  Well, at least I did in this post.  Used US spelling above though.   eek.gif

 

[This message has been edited by Newt (edited 13 June 2001).]

 

I thought fish went by another sense, called smell blah, blah ..etc from a distance, home in etc. Why wasn`t I born with barbels on the end of my mouth?

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Guest Bruno Broughton

Shamrock

 

Please keep posting that one - another couple and I'll be the first on A.N. to claim a four-leaved clover.

 

 

 

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Bruno

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Guest pete falloon

how about fish looking up at a floating bait on the surface. Surely that is silhouetted against the sky and they can't tell the differences in colour... or can they?

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Guest Steve Burke

The eyes of most fish, like humans, contain both rods and cones, the latter being sensitive to colour. Additionally, there's been a huge number of scientific experiments done over many years that prove that most fish can see in colour.

 

It appears that colour perception varies from species to species. For instance, perch can see into the infra-red somewhat due to a chemical in the eye called porphyropsin. Of all our coarse fish they have the best vision apart from zander. This means that they feed best in low light, although unlike zander they rarely feed at night.

 

 

 

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Wingham Fisheries

http://www.anglersnet.co.uk/fisheries/wingham.htm

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Guest Newt

Shamrock - fish do have multiple sensory input structures - as do humans. In addition to vision, they do have a sense of smell and some species use barbels for an even keener version of this. Many also use a lateral line to detect vibration. Mostly predators as it helps them locate fish and other food sources that are moving erratically. Not sure if they have "hearing" similar to ours but I suspect yes.

 

Also, I really think the carp in my area have ESP as they have done a great job this year of saying to themselves, "Newt is here. Lets go elsewhere to eat." frown.gif

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