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Vagabond

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Posts posted by Vagabond


  1. Interesting discussion.

     

    As an all-rounder, fishing all over the world,I own a lot of reels, from big game down through various multipliers (boat and surfcasting ) baitcasters, spincasters,closed face reels, fixed spools, (most with bale arms, my old Mitchell with claw pick-up) centrerpins and fly reels from #12 for tarpon down to a #2 for brooklet fishing.

     

    I had to learn to be reasonably proficient with all of them, but always concentrated on accuracy rather than distance, especially on the small freshwater waters I was brought up on.

     

    For sea fishing with multipliers i prefer righthand wind, but for most freshwater work I use lefthand wind because the master hand (my righthand) is of more use in controlling the rod.

     

    The odd one out is baitcasting - my smaller reels are of the " spincaster " closed-face variety with lefthand wind - but my larger ones are multipliers, and because they were purchased in the USA are righthand wind. It has never bothered me, I cast with right hand , and as the lure drops into the water I automatically switch the rod to my left hand to wind in righthanded.. Have always fished that way - each to his own preference


  2. As ever, one must be wary of confusing correlation with causation.

    The Earth has only warmed by a fraction of a degree and while I have no idea whether there are fossil records relating to cattle egrets, my first question would relate to changing land usage. A lot of northern hemisphere temperate and cool temperate forests have been cleared in the last couple of millennia to create pasture for large bovines.

    There could be a clue in the name of the bird in question somewhere....

    That is exactly what I was implying in my reference to "agriculture"

     

    but the northward spread of the Great Egret is less easily explained. Its first breeding recorded in the UK was about 2012, and there have been several instances since, There may well be factors involved other than temperature change, but so far nothing credible has been suggested


  3. A mate of mine recently cited the appearance of birds such as egrets in the UK as evidence of global warming but it turns out that one need only look as far as Wikipedia to kill that argument.

    "....

    There has been a similar argument re cattle egrets. but that can be discounted in that cattle egrets are spreading worldwide into all sorts of wetland and agricultural habitats Towards, parallel to and away from the equator.

     

    However, the recent northward spread of the Great Egret is less easily explained except by global warming.

     

    There is no doubt that Earth is at the moment getting warmer - the climate of Earth has been changing ever since it was formed some 4.6 billion years ago - as Chesters said, sometimes getting warmer, sometimes getting cooler. Whether man can do anything about it is another matter. A logician might suggest reducing the human population back to that of the Palaeocene, but I can't see that view becoming popular rolleyes.gif


  4. There have afterall been close to 50 years of lies on the Europhile side, starting with Edward Heath assiduously cultivating the utterly misleading impression that belonging to the ‘Common Market’ would entail no loss of national sovereignty.

    "Come neighbours all ,both great and small ,

    Come listen to me here,

    I tell of a maid who was waylaid,

    By a Common Marketeer

    He wooed her with fair promises

    of foreign wines and grub,

    Then sad to say he had his way,

    and left her in the club"

    • Like 2

  5. Robert John ("Bob") Church aged 83

     

    Chevin and I had the privilege of fishing with Bob in the days before he became well-known for his tackle company and international fly fisherman. He was a keen coarse fisherman then, along with with his fellow members of the Northampton Specimen Group - I can remember an outing to Billing Aquadrome with some of them, including that most interesting character, Fred Wagstaffe, later of pike fishing fame.

     

    I seem well on course to be last man standing from that era, but Chevin at least is still with us AFAIK

    • Like 4

  6. Live fauna Squid (several sorts), octopus, lobster, crab, spider crab, mussel, goose barnacle, various sea anemones, usually attached to small rock, Various bits of various jellyfish freshwater mussel, crayfish (native and signal) terrapin, saltwater crocodile. swan, great crested grebe, frog, mallard, swallow (dry fly, on backcast ) pipistrelle bat (ditto)

     

    Dead fauna Skate skeleton, rat, cat,

     

    Live flora About 10 % of that listed in Plants of the World (including most of the world's seaweeds)

     

    Dead flora Similar 10% plus many mangrove roots

     

    Inaminate Two made up rod,reel and line outfits, bed chair, kettle, various tin cans, rags, small attache case, bottomless bucket, very old keep-net. Oh, and one made up carp oufit with live 5 lb carp attached, deliberately snagged the rod with a Mepps No 3 - the small boy who had left his rod unattended didn't say "fanks mister", only wanted to know if the fish counted in his match weight laugh.png

     

    That's not an exhaustive list, just what I can recall off the top of my head


  7. I found, at the waterside, a pair of stainless steel artery forceps which were CAMOUFLAGED. (which is presumably why the previous owner had failed to find them)

     

    Scraped the paint off, they are now gleaming silver. Find lots of fancy floats also, Keep them in my tackle box but have never found a use for them (see porcupine quill thread)


  8. My "go to" float for short range still water fishing (ie up to a couple of rod lengths) A splash of paint on the tip (fluo orange , yellow, scarlet or matt black according to background and lighting) and a slice of cycle valve rubber each end. Sorted

     

    Guaranteed to go down. smile.png

     

    Home made Quill (porcupine, peacock, goose, pigeon and crow) or cork on quill form 90% of my floats - tackle dealers eat your hearts out.whistling.gif

    • Like 2

  9. Polaris is great for fishing at range in gravel pits with many bars and hollows. Not just float legering, but float paternoster also, so that your bait is a fixed distance from the bottom, whatever the depth - a method particularly good for perch.

    • Like 1

  10. Its obviously not a concern an infected passenger could fly to anywhere on earth before any symptoms appear ,if ebola is that bad why is heathrow and gatwick still open ?

    There is an old saying about bolting horses and (unbolted) stable doors.

     

    Nobody thinks it will happen until it does.


  11. some cyclists are a55holes but there are a considerably larger number of car drivers who fit that bracket if for no other reason than there are more of them using the roads than cyclists.

    Yes , I'll drink to that, it fits with that great American trout fisher's; (John Geirach's) sagacious quote.

     

    "There are only two types of anglers - your own party, and the assholes"


  12. The"Think Bike" campaign is for motorcyclists.

     

    Does that mean you think pedal-cyclists are fair game ?

     

    I regard "bike" as applying to anything with two in-line wheels (the clue is in the original name BI-cycle)

     

     

    True, a motorised idiot-cyclist is an even greater hazard than one using pedal-power


  13. There is no such thing as "Road Tax",

     

    Indeed there is not. Quite irrelevant. I didn't mention it. I said cyclists should be road-taxed. Ie pay cess to the Revenue for riding a cycle on a public road NOTE THE USAGE OF THE LOWER CASE here and in the original post.. What the official name for this tax might be matters not a flying flicker What matters even less in this context is what taxes are levied on other road users, or what pettifogging names such taxes have. It is a politician's trick to try to change the subject and/or quibble about semantics, but it won't work here.

     

    A tax, cess or impost on anyone who rides a cycle on the road and a swingeing fine if they ride one where they should not, - like shopping malls, railway platforms, pavements, kiddies playgrounds, etc. -clear enough ?


  14. Perhaps if cage drivers thought of others we would not need "Think Bike" signs. I have lost count of how many times some divot pulled out in front of me from a T junction and tthe excuse was "I didn't see you mate", an admission of driving without due care.

    Pretty pointless observation, as would be my recounting how many times I've had to make an emergency stop or swerve because a cyclist does something daft.

     

    By regarding cyclists as crass idiots I've probably saved about a dozen of their lives.

     

    By the way I rode a cycle from age 10 to 16, a motor cycle from age 16 to age 22, have driven a car ever since, plus tractors, minibuses, light goods vehicles and steam locomotives and towed caravans and trailers. Allied to that I have been a pedestrian for the best part of my 85 years. So I have experienced road traffic conditions from all aspects. There is no doubt that the untrained (that's 99 % of them) cyclists are the biggest menace to road safety.

     

    Yes, I know all cyclists on this forum regard themselves as paragons of excellence., Whether or not this is true,you are all very safe from me, why ? because I regard all cyclists as suicidal idiots and give them a wide berth.

     

    you should be thanking me for it.

     

    AS not all road users think as I do, then you need some self-protection. A cycling proficiency test, registration and MOT tests of cycles plus third party insurance should be mandatory.

     

    PS, I forgot to add that cycles should be road-taxed.

    • Like 1

  15. "Match weights speak for themselves."

     

     

    They do indeed, but what they say to me in the case you refer to, is "avoid this water"

     

     

    Match weights measured in hundredweights tell a story of overcrowded mud puddles crammed with hungry fish. Granted, some will always catch more than others, but this is a skill of the factory production line rather than any piscatorial ability. Matches where almost everyone catches into three figures don't seem to me to prove very much.

     

    It is a long way from the days of the stick float and a match won with 3 lb odd of roach on a difficult water, with 60% of the participants water-licked.. Whether that is "progress" is a matter of opinion, but I ceased match fishing sixty years ago (or one could say I grew out of it - but that sounds patronising, and I did learn a lot from matchfishers during my teens)

     

    Unfortunately the illusion of skill associated with large catch weights spills over into club waters, and waters with good roach, tench and crucian fishing are becoming stocked with oversized gut-buckets (that's the carp, not necessarily those who fish for them) at the demand of members. OK, its a democracy, and if most want carp I will have to put up with them, but I need a bait that tench, roach, etc will take, but which is not palatable to carp.

     

    My preference is for the challenge of small streams, but increasing age and decreasing mobility means I have to turn to still waters for my fishing - I really do appreciate a challenge, but waters that yield pastie after pastie after pastie do not provide it. .

    • Like 1

  16. Back to the original thread, I keep seeing posters at road junctions, etc, urging us to "Think Bike"

     

    I cannot help but comply, adding to myself "they are too stupid to think for themselves"

     

    Perhaps the posters would have more impact if my amendment were added ?

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