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Vagabond

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Posts posted by Vagabond

  1. On 10/29/2020 at 9:09 PM, bluezulu said:

    chesters the pool i caught them from is stuffed with brown gold fish and all the locals that fish it think they are catching crucians. they won't have it when i tell them otherwise.

    I could tell a similar story about a pond stocked with bream and silver bream.    I was called in to settle a dispute.  One bloke reckoned he hsd caught a 3 lb silver bream.  Half the club supported him, the other half hated his guts and wanted his fish, him, and all his tribe exterm   er disqualified.

    I was authorised to dissect a couple of small samples and examine their pharyngeal teeth. It will not necessarily show anything I told them, but they said they had looked the  numbers of teeth up in a book  They would examine the teeth they said, they  just needed me to provide them, as they didn't know what they looked like, whereabouts in the fish they were, or how to get them out ! They had already done fin-ray and scale counts, but the book hadn't helped, everyone who tried to count came up with a different number which matched neither fish's fin-ray or scale count.

    The entire club turned up to watch the dissection,, plus their sisters and their cousins and their aunts.    Dissected the fish, waved the pharyngeals at the mob.  One row of teeth, plus one row of four boney knobs pretending to be teeth.  "Definitely not bronze bream" I said. ( Bronze bream have two rows of five longish pointed teeth each side, Silvers have eight stubbier teeth in two rows, five and three)  Great roar of triumph  from  the silver king and his acolytes.

    "However" I added, "I cannot certify it as a silver bream, because a hybrid of bronze and silver could show exactly the same pharyngeal pattern as we have here - in fact you can't say for certain that any fish is a silver without a DNA test - and even then the results might be arguable".   Great roar of triumph from the other half of the club, whilst Silver King and his mates went home to make plasticine models of Vagabond and stick pins in them.

    • Haha 1
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  2. I've pulled forward my post of two years ago.    If I had followed my schoolboy whim and become a bookie, I might well have become a billionaire like Denise  and left the day to day running of the betting shops to underlings whilst enjoying the proceeds.  I could have afforded many more trips abroad after exotic species, more salmon fishing,  my own marlin boat and luxury back-up etc etc..  - and as a result of the life-style that went with it,  probably died of a stroke in my fifties - or not - as Chesters might put it.

     

    The amount of money spent by betting firms on advertisements during televised sport programs is an indication of how lucrative a business bookmaking is.

     

     

     

  3. On 8/10/2018 at 11:35 PM, Vagabond said:

    Sherlock Holmes "For some reason it seems to perpetually astonish the British public that one horse can run faster than another"

     

     

    Our R I master (sanctimonious old humbug) used to preach and screech about the evils of gambling, which made me inclined to take up bookmaking as a career.

     

    By contrast our maths master, after our final School Cert exams (yes I pre-date GCEs) spent the last few maths lessons of our school careers taking us through the mathematics of making a book. That nearly convinced me to become a bookie - and stopped me from ever becoming a punter !

     

  4. Thanks BB for a good summary of how wind affects carp

     

    Also see my comments on venue 2 in the earlier thread "Winding Down"

    As Dick Walker once said "How much intelligence, for the love of Mike, does an angler need to realise that floating food will go where the wind blows it ?"

     

     

    • Like 2
  5. Try the slack buffer zone just above the bridge piers  - it seems counter-intuitive but there is often a good trout there.

     

    A place I have often found disappointing is the fishy-looking pool below a waterfall.   It always looks inviting - sends me the clear message "now here be monsters"   but I can't remember ever catching anything but "run-of-the-mill" fish from  such spots

  6. It happens to be convenient for us to use three similar bank accounts - her money, my money and a household account.   As some sort of compensation for a  miserly, derisory and sheer bloody "stuff you. moosh"  rate of interest, our bank has cut a "deal" with a publishing company. As a result we get a "free" monthly mag with each account.    One on Birdwatching, for Norma, one on preserved Steam Locomotives for me, and as no other candidate is worth considering, thought "Improve Your Coarse Fishing" would provide a laugh or two.

    The first two are acceptable, a bit "Mickey Mouse" in places, but one or two really good articles most months. Not the third magazine though. Unfortunately to call IYCF "infantile" is to grossly inflate its credibility. Here is a quote from a recent article on surface fishing for carp

    Quote

    "Pay attention to wind direction.

    Ideally you want to find a swim with the wind blowing from behind you. This will help when it comes to feeding, casting and tackle control.   If it is blowing in your face , your loosefeed will simply end up back at your feet."

    I wish I were joking, but that is what it said.  For the benefit of any newcomers to angling, read our experienced members' comments on this pearl of wisdom (NOT) - that quote could hardly be more wrong.   I won't comment further at this stage but will let the rest of you have a go first.

    Its all yours,  lads and lasses.

  7. 6 minutes ago, chesters1 said:

    Show off! I had a close call with a toad once

    I've met him !   A minor club official with delusions of grandeur.    Didn't have any I.D. on him but demanded to see my club card and licence.  I told him to go climb a tree.

    Re the salties...

    The only other occasion where wildlife stopped me fishing was on the Oykel    Fly fishing for Salmon , wading a rapid, above a deep pool, and was attacked by midges.   I was not being bitten much, but two eyes full of midges meant I couldn.t see - in a fast current in midstream. Chucking handfuls of river water into my eyes was all I could do and the midges came back as soon as I stopped the irrigation.   Was damn glad to get out of the water

    • Like 1
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  8. 16 hours ago, Bobj said:

    You want excitement? Try barramundi fishing with 10 to 14 ft crocs eyeing you as a potential meal

    Bob, we've had some !         Fishing the Top End in a tinny, we were free lining blueys into likely barra spots and slowly retrieviing them as we drifted uo a tidal creek.   One spot seemed pretty good, several barras around the 10 lb mark.   So we put the hook down.   After a bit I got snagged - pulled for a break, and the "snag" went away across the bottom. then climbed up the creek bank and  revealed itself as a 4 ft saltie. Then Norma hooked another "snag" - a 6-footer this time .    We had a few more.   "Al" I said to the guide, "is it my imagination, or is each croc we see bigger than the one before ?"

    "Too right" said Al  " and as the last one was 10 ft the next might be trouble"      He drew my attention to the gashes on the side of the boat from past attempts by salties to get aboard.   He reckoned that the bigger the croc, the more likely it was to work out where all these  blueys were coming from.  "Time to move" he said, and I wasn't gonna argue....

    Iv'e fished a few mangrove swamps on foot,and the possibility of crocs really sharpens up your awareness and fieldcraft.   Fished a few jungle streams in big cat country too, and that keeps one on alert also.      

     

    • Like 2
  9. Chris, Steve - I have a draft for another book, following on from A.V.    My indoor hobby, now that tackle making and fly-tying are beyond my tremor-racked hands,  is postal history, especially rail-related postal history ("The Night Mail crossing the border " etc ) - it does not leave much time for book production - since retiring I have often wondered how I ever found time to go to work !

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  10. Hi Bobj    We have a range of orchids indoors.   Cymbidiums, Cattleya, Masdevallia, Odontoglossums, Oncidiums, Paphiopedilums, Phalaenopsis and Dendrobium.       All flower regularly except the Dendrobiums, all three of which flowered once, two years ago, but nothing since.

    Have followed what the books say re watering, humidity, temperature, light etc, but they show no sign of flowering.  Good healthy new growth but no flower buds.   We must be missing something, Dendrobia are supposed to be easy to grow and flower.   Any comment ?

    • Thanks 1
  11. On 9/28/2020 at 11:05 AM, Huge_Vitae said:

    Tap on your own name on the post above, when your box opens tap on “edit profile” top right of page.

    Done that twice.  Typed a new version into "Profile"  Saved it.       Can't find a way of replacing the old version with the new one.

  12. As an RNLI governor, I agree with Chesters, and will be "considering my position"      "Saving Lives at Sea" is one thing, facilitating illegal immigration is something else.    ...... and Yes, I fully realise that finding the dividing line is difficult, but clearly, we cannot go on as at present.

     

  13. Would not accept my jpegs even after cropping, so considered my blood pressure and gave up.  You will have to imagine a very ordinary silvery common  of about 2 lb from Venue 1 captioned "one of many" and an eight-pound partly scaled yellowfin mirror from Venue 2 captioned "Fish from a barrel".    Both are shown resting on the net, which is in turn resting on an unhooking mat, which id in its turn resting on the grass.  All very comfy - keeps the carp huggers happy.

     

    Next question - how does one get at what used to be called your "signature" on the old system ? I wish to bring the species numbers up to date.

  14. Thanks Chesters,  and thanks again for the copy pf Carp Fever.  good history of the early hair rig trials.   I wonder what BB, Walker, Hutchinson and Maddocks would make of modern carp puddles.   Those four are all good reading, 

     

    Glad you too have a good tomato crop.   Norma has turned all our main tomato crop into concentrated soup, salsa,  sauce and other products which have been bottled, frozen and otherwise stored -should last until next years crop is ready, although we are still picking.    Stacks of Bramley apples this year also.  Norma has just taken a gallon of tomato soup next door, they had a bumper crop of tomatoes as well, and as they supply us with free eggs, free rhubarb, etc and are better smallholders than cooks we barter a cooking service (and a chicken-sitting service - careful how you say it- if they take a holiday)  In exchange for fresh produce.  

  15. 18 hours ago, Vagabond said:

    Winding down  -  angling as one gets older and frailer.

     

    Having caught shark, marlin, and sturgeon over 300 lb, and several hundred species from places as diverse as the Amazon Basin, the Australian outback, the Southern Ocean, the Caribbean coral flats and the streams of the American Divide. It is with some disbelief that I find age, muscle weakness and increasingly severe angina drastically limiting where I can fish.  I have always loved catching wild fish in wild places, which has had me fishing in all seven oceans, and six of the seven continents. (went to the seventh – Antarctica – bird watching, didn’t fish as ice too thick),

    So, my choice is either to give up fishing altogether, or re-appraise the easier club lakes, and even the despised “carp-filled mud puddles” that are the only accessible waters for someone who suffers intense chest pain (think elephant standing on chest) if required to walk more than 20 yards, to do anything in a hurry or stand up for more than three minutes. The only saving grace is that a dose of nitroglycerine ends the pain in about three to five minutes.  Thus a distance of 60 yards needs three doses of nitro and three periods of five-minute rest. No good for a roving hillstream fisher !

    So after thought, I made my choice, ie fishing from a chair is better than no fishing.  So  I  have to fish only those swims I can get to – no sussing out where the fish are, no roving, no scrambling into difficult swims.  But then, I am no worse off  than the match fisherman who has to fish the peg he or she has drawn – so - you can only catch the fish in front of you or those you can entice into your swim. This in turn means one has to revise one’s expectations and set a realistic target.  Above all remember this is not a match, so no need to hurry – fishing is a leisure sport – not an Olympic time-trial.

    On the plus side, I have been fishing alone since the age of seven, so have eighty years experience to draw upon, allied to which I have had the good fortune to fish with some very good anglers indeed, so I must have learnt something.   My adventures henceforth might be of interest to others confined to easily accessible swims. Here are three waters I fished this  last week.  Norma and I decided to have a week in the campervan, visiting bird reserves, and staying at camping sites offering fishing.

    Norma would lead the birding trips, with me following on a hired mobility scooter. And I would lead the fishing trips, with Norma doing the netting, fish handling, and returning. Weighing and photography would be kept to a minimum.  Occasional casting , loose feeding and playing a fish I can cope with.  Handling any fish of two pounds upwards and getting it safely back into the water has me reaching for the nitro, so I am fortunate that Norma can take that on, and it gives me a short rest after playing a fish to the net. 

    NB All venues had similar rules, No bread, No floating baits, No braid, No barbs, No microbarbs No baiting with boilies.

    So – Venue 1

    Swim 20 yards from the campervan.  Flat grassy bank, water surface one foot below the bank and one foot deep tight against the bank.  Even slope outwards - the depth at a rod length out was 3 ft,  A narrow fringe of Norfolk reed with an eight foot  gap and a  bottom of fine gravel with a little silt comprised my swim. The plummet told me that further from the shore the silt became thicker.  What was out there ?

    Keeping my hands low, I flicked 3 or 4 maggots into the swim, and kept doing that until small rudd and small perch began to assemble, then switched to sweet corn (no result) then small Spam cubes which brought better rudd and some small carp.   Persistent loose feeding for about fifteen minutes brought nothing bigger than half-pound rudd and two pound carp. Observation of other anglers showed similar fish being caught from other swims.   Having assessed the swim, time to fish.   Set my targets, 2lb carp, half-pound rudd, and see how close to the bank I could hook a carp.

    Tried several baits, maggot, dendrobena worms, Spam, sweet corn, Caught on all of them, except sweet corn (not a bite, neither on its own nor in combination with other baits)  Most baits free-lined with perhaps a BB shot to provide casting weight.  To stop dendys from wriggling off a barbless hook (or being sucked off) a soft pellet was used

    Result.   Lots of small perch, medium sized rudd to half a pound, about a score of carp all between ¾ and 3 lb.   Nearest to bank, (a carp) half an inch !

    Comment – Won’t fish there again, just too easy.  Could have caught many more if prepared to hurry, but as stated before, that’s not my style.

     

    Venue 2

    Swim about 30 yds from van, ground level, so did it in one hop. A small pool about 80 yds by 30 yds,   the owner said it held lots of carp (true). some bream, (unconfirmed)  with “the biggest carp over 20 lb” (taken with a pinch of salt – you can safely divide most owner’s estimates by a factor of three) About four feet deep close to the bank with the water about 3 feet down a near-vertical bank, little vegetation on bank. Bottom very silty. 

    There was a howling Easterly that day and a bright sun, no cloud..

    “When the East wind blows and the sun shines bright,

    Then don’t expect the fish to bite”                 

    A bad omen, but I heeded the other one        “”Carp follow the wind, and the stronger the wind, the  more strongly they follow it”                    So I elected to fish into the teeth of the gale.  The swim was not the nearest to the van, so that was one principle out the window.    Sat well back from the water, flicked a few Spam chunks in and cautiously peeped over. There was a rugby scrum of carp after the slowly sinking Spam pieces. All from about two pounds to around 8 , Now one thing I have learnt is that carp become fearless (or maybe just careless) in choppy water so I elected to fish tightline, just a hook in a lump of Spam  dangled into the choppy waves.  The fish fought to get at the bait – very often all one could see were seven or eight round open mouths all seeking the same chunk of Spam and shouldering the other carp out of the way. I did my best to keep the bait away from the smaller fish and keep it available for anything that looked to be over 7.   I only partially succeeded, as out of 15 carp landed, 12 looked about 6 lb or less, 3 of greater weight..   Norma weighed the biggest – just over eight.pound.    Retired for an early tea.

    Comment  There were people up the other end catching two pounders,as fast as they could pull them in - the place was absolutely stuffed with carp.   “Shooting fish in a barrel” came to mind.    

     

    Venue 3

    This swim was “difficult” as it was 70 yards from the van, and uphill all the way.  Two stops for nitro and the second needed a big dose and a fifteen minute rest.

    The East wind had gone and it was a hot sunny day. There was an island in the lake and breeching carp by it, but only fishable from some steep swims on the opposite bank. Too far away, too unfriendly, so elected to fish the nearest swim , Steep, but some negotiable steps down to it. This was a bit like venue 1 – but a far thicker fringe of Norfolk reed, The channel leading into the lake was therefore twice as long, about 20 ft, This channel was 6 inches deep at the bankside and about 2 ft where it met the main lake.

    Fishing through the gap into the lake produced rudd to half a pound up in the water, and nothing at all on the bottom.   So I elected to bait up the outer part of the channel – it was fairly clear water and I could see there was nothing there, but I hoped to entice something in.

    A liberal dose of groundbait was laid down in the outer LH corner of the channel with  plenty of Spam chunks and halibut pellets (the maggots and dendrobenas were long gone) The afternoon wore on, still no action, the sun sank, and in the early dusk came the action I was hoping for. Carp patrol the margins at such a time, looking for the discarded bait that departing anglers leave behind.  One was in the channel ! We waited motionless whilst it mopped up every piece of Spam, before picking up the hookbait and shooting into the LH reedbed.   Lets say it tried to shoot into the reeds, for by now I was holding it rather harder than my 6 lb Maxima justified.    Good old Maxima – tough as old boots. A bit more stick and the carp decided to try the RH reedbed instead, only to find itself hitting the back of the net wielded by the expert netswoman who I was wise enough to marry.

    Result was a very angry carp thrashing about in the net, but fortunately the hook came free easily, the net handle was unscrewed, and the carp weighed  (8lb) and returned, still thrashing angrily.

    That experience was a bit more worthwhile, I felt I worked for and deserved that fish.

    Comment  After two somewhat disappointing results, it was nice to feel that with advancing years a bit of experience and watercraft has been accumulated over a lifetime and to a small extent can compensate  for the handicap of reduced mobility.

    Watch this space.

     

    • Like 1
  16. On 9/20/2020 at 10:33 AM, gozzer said:

    Not sure what's happening, but it took 3 attempts to post the above, I had to copy it, sign back in and then paste it back in to reply. Is there a new 'timed out' limit on the new layout?

    John.

    After losing a post about four-fifths done I produce a version off-line, then copy and paste it in.     Saves an awful lot of frustration.    Now to see about putting piccys in, 

    • Like 2
  17. Winding down  -  angling as one gets older and frailer.

     

    Having caught shark, marlin, and sturgeon over 300 lb, and several hundred species from places as diverse as the Amazon Basin, the Australian outback, the Southern Ocean, the Caribbean coral flats and the streams of the American Divide. It is with some disbelief that I find age, muscle weakness and increasingly severe angina drastically limiting where I can fish.  I have always loved catching wild fish in wild places, which has had me fishing in all seven oceans, and six of the seven continents. (went to the seventh – Antarctica – bird watching, didn’t fish as ice too thick),

    So, my choice is either to give up fishing altogether, or re-appraise the easier club lakes, and even the despised “carp-filled mud puddles” that are the only accessible waters for someone who suffers intense chest pain (think elephant standing on chest) if required to walk more than 20 yards, to do anything in a hurry or stand up for more than three minutes. The only saving grace is that a dose of nitroglycerine ends the pain in about three to five minutes.  Thus a distance of 60 yards needs three doses of nitro and three periods of five-minute rest. No good for a roving hillstream fisher !

    So after thought, I made my choice, ie fishing from a chair is better than no fishing.  So  I  have to fish only those swims I can get to – no sussing out where the fish are, no roving, no scrambling into difficult swims.  But then, I am no worse off  than the match fisherman who has to fish the peg he or she has drawn – so - you can only catch the fish in front of you or those you can entice into your swim. This in turn means one has to revise one’s expectations and set a realistic target.  Above all remember this is not a match, so no need to hurry – fishing is a leisure sport – not an Olympic time-trial.

    On the plus side, I have been fishing alone since the age of seven, so have eighty years experience to draw upon, allied to which I have had the good fortune to fish with some very good anglers indeed, so I must have learnt something.   My adventures henceforth might be of interest to others confined to easily accessible swims. Here are three waters I fished this  last week.  Norma and I decided to have a week in the campervan, visiting bird reserves, and staying at camping sites offering fishing.

    Norma would lead the birding trips, with me following on a hired mobility scooter. And I would lead the fishing trips, with Norma doing the netting, fish handling, and returning. Weighing and photography would be kept to a minimum.  Occasional casting , loose feeding and playing a fish I can cope with.  Handling any fish of two pounds upwards and getting it safely back into the water has me reaching for the nitro, so I am fortunate that Norma can take that on, and it gives me a short rest after playing a fish to the net. 

    NB All venues had similar rules, No bread, No floating baits, No braid, No barbs, No microbarbs No baiting with boilies.

    So – Venue 1

    Swim 20 yards from the campervan.  Flat grassy bank, water surface one foot below the bank and one foot deep tight against the bank.  Even slope outwards - the depth at a rod length out was 3 ft,  A narrow fringe of Norfolk reed with an eight foot  gap and a  bottom of fine gravel with a little silt comprised my swim. The plummet told me that further from the shore the silt became thicker.  What was out there ?

    Keeping my hands low, I flicked 3 or 4 maggots into the swim, and kept doing that until small rudd and small perch began to assemble, then switched to sweet corn (no result) then small Spam cubes which brought better rudd and some small carp.   Persistent loose feeding for about fifteen minutes brought nothing bigger than half-pound rudd and two pound carp. Observation of other anglers showed similar fish being caught from other swims.   Having assessed the swim, time to fish.   Set my targets, 2lb carp, half-pound rudd, and see how close to the bank I could hook a carp.

    Tried several baits, maggot, dendrobena worms, Spam, sweet corn, Caught on all of them, except sweet corn (not a bite, neither on its own nor in combination with other baits)  Most baits free-lined with perhaps a BB shot to provide casting weight.  To stop dendys from wriggling off a barbless hook (or being sucked off) a soft pellet was used

    Result.   Lots of small perch, medium sized rudd to half a pound, about a score of carp all between ¾ and 3 lb.   Nearest to bank, (a carp) half an inch !

    Comment – Won’t fish there again, just too easy.  Could have caught many more if prepared to hurry, but as stated before, that’s not my style.

     

    Venue 2

    Swim about 30 yds from van, ground level, so did it in one hop. A small pool about 80 yds by 30 yds,   the owner said it held lots of carp (true). some bream, (unconfirmed)  with “the biggest carp over 20 lb” (taken with a pinch of salt – you can safely divide most owner’s estimates by a factor of three) About four feet deep close to the bank with the water about 3 feet down a near-vertical bank, little vegetation on bank. Bottom very silty. 

    There was a howling Easterly that day and a bright sun, no cloud..

    “When the East wind blows and the sun shines bright,

    Then don’t expect the fish to bite”                 

    A bad omen, but I heeded the other one        “”Carp follow the wind, and the stronger the wind, the  more strongly they follow it”                    So I elected to fish into the teeth of the gale.  The swim was not the nearest to the van, so that was one principle out the window.    Sat well back from the water, flicked a few Spam chunks in and cautiously peeped over. There was a rugby scrum of carp after the slowly sinking Spam pieces. All from about two pounds to around 8 , Now one thing I have learnt is that carp become fearless (or maybe just careless) in choppy water so I elected to fish tightline, just a hook in a lump of Spam  dangled into the choppy waves.  The fish fought to get at the bait – very often all one could see were seven or eight round open mouths all seeking the same chunk of Spam and shouldering the other carp out of the way. I did my best to keep the bait away from the smaller fish and keep it available for anything that looked to be over 7.   I only partially succeeded, as out of 15 carp landed, 12 looked about 6 lb or less, 3 of greater weight..   Norma weighed the biggest – just over eight.pound.    Retired for an early tea.

    Comment  There were people up the other end catching two pounders,as fast as they could pull them in - the place was absolutely stuffed with carp.   “Shooting fish in a barrel” came to mind.    

     

    Venue 3

    This swim was “difficult” as it was 70 yards from the van, and uphill all the way.  Two stops for nitro and the second needed a big dose and a fifteen minute rest.

    The East wind had gone and it was a hot sunny day. There was an island in the lake and breeching carp by it, but only fishable from some steep swims on the opposite bank. Too far away, too unfriendly, so elected to fish the nearest swim , Steep, but some negotiable steps down to it. This was a bit like venue 1 – but a far thicker fringe of Norfolk reed, The channel leading into the lake was therefore twice as long, about 20 ft, This channel was 6 inches deep at the bankside and about 2 ft where it met the main lake.

    Fishing through the gap into the lake produced rudd to half a pound up in the water, and nothing at all on the bottom.   So I elected to bait up the outer part of the channel – it was fairly clear water and I could see there was nothing there, but I hoped to entice something in.

    A liberal dose of groundbait was laid down in the outer LH corner of the channel with  plenty of Spam chunks and halibut pellets (the maggots and dendrobenas were long gone) The afternoon wore on, still no action, the sun sank, and in the early dusk came the action I was hoping for. Carp patrol the margins at such a time, looking for the discarded bait that departing anglers leave behind.  One was in the channel ! We waited motionless whilst it mopped up every piece of Spam, before picking up the hookbait and shooting into the LH reedbed.   Lets say it tried to shoot into the reeds, for by now I was holding it rather harder than my 6 lb Maxima justified.    Good old Maxima – tough as old boots. A bit more stick and the carp decided to try the RH reedbed instead, only to find itself hitting the back of the net wielded by the expert netswoman who I was wise enough to marry.

    Result was a very angry carp thrashing about in the net, but fortunately the hook came free easily, the net handle was unscrewed, and the carp weighed  (8lb) and returned, still thrashing angrily.

    That experience was a bit more worthwhile, I felt I worked for and deserved that fish.

    Comment  After two somewhat disappointing results, it was nice to feel that with advancing years a bit of experience and watercraft has been accumulated over a lifetime and to a small extent can compensate  for the handicap of reduced mobility.

    Watch this space.

    • Like 6
  18. My principle 're knots is to avoid strangle knots where the bit above the hook  eye is a single strand around which the rest of the knot forms a wrapping .(as in the blood knot family)

    Both the grinner and the Palomar avoid this (although in different ways)  if either of these knots is tied carefully and snugged down they will not (pun intended) fail.

    • Like 2
  19. On 8/21/2020 at 8:29 AM, corydoras said:

    To quick. I'd rather waterboard the c@nt with pig's urine every day for the rest of his life. Put the W@nker on a diet of cheap bologne made from pig's intestines.

    Hmm   How do you reconcile this view with your comments 're capital punishment in a previous thread.   Or do you disapprove of capital punishment because you think daily torture would be more appropriate ?

    It seems as if in this post you assume the accused is guilty, whereas in your postings on the death penalty you assume a high proportion of innocence.  You really cannot have it both ways - as the harlot said to the bishop. 

     

     

    • Like 1
  20. I have never actually fallen in, but have got wet on numerous occasions .  By far the commonest was wading an inch or more deeper than my waderr length.  A bit of a laugh in thigh waders, less so in waist waders, and getting a bit hairy in chest waders.  Done that in many rivers and in surf.  If you ever don chest waders It is very important to invest in a good stout wading staff, both for feeling your way in a rocky river, and providing a third leg in a dodgy current or surf.  Once you get chest deep it is easy to get knocked off your feet  by a wave or a current surge.  At 86+ my wading days are well and truly over,

    Have also had to swim for it as a result of a canoe  collision - a canoe shot out from a side stream and rode over our stern and Norma's leg.  (Incidentally Tigger this was in Madagascar, not the Amazon)    there is an account somewhere in the AN archives.

    I have however once been washed in.  There was e deep pool into which the water ran through a culvert . Just where the culvert entered was screened by overhanging trees and bushes, so the only way to fish that spot was to approach through the culvert which was brick-lined.  This I did in pair of rubber-doled thigh waders.   Slipped on the slimy bricks, which deposited me on my gluteal adiposities (fat a### in English) blocking the culvert and promoting a build-up of water behind me. This washed me out into the pool.  I remember thinking how ridiculous the incident was, and burst out laughing as I was washed in. Got out easily enough (did you know it is perfectly possible to swim whilst holding a fishing rod ?)'

     

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  21. I carry groundbait dry and mix with Venice water for the same reason as b-bear.  In the same way if there are any molehills near the water I add some molehill soil to the mix .  Molehill soil smells quite strongly of earthworms - even I, a mere human, can detect it.

    Using lake water also avoids the chlorine problem.  We grow a lot of fancy plants including orchids and they definitely dislike chlorine, so we have installed three water butts to catch rainwater.  If I ever mixed groundbait at home I would use rainwater.

    I see the bloody spellchecker has stuck its nose in again. For Venice read venue.

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  22. My favourite fishing is wild trout.   The only uk writer who comes  anywhere near my philosophy is John Inglis Hall.   "A highland stream"

    Streets ahead of everyone is the American  writer John Geirach.   "Fishing the High Country"  and many others

    That said, I have several hundred angling  books   -  good, bad and indifferent 

     

     

     

     

  23. Well,  I'm glad nobody has written my obituary!    Thanks for all the kind remarks -  especially about the book.  I reconnected yesterday - see Tiggers thread  're a few hours out.  Still fishing in my 87th year,  albeit just small still waters due to ever increasing angina problems.

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  24. Hi all.  Found you at last.  Y"all disappeared from my PC and I just got "cannot find" for weeks.   Found this route on Norma"s Kindle.  Mobility has crashed a bit and I ca n I just about stagger 50 yards from car park to swim with the aid of a few puffs of triglyceride  (bloody spell checker won't let me write "nitro" and "glycerine" as one word.)  Norma does the driving  and gillies for me, even finds time to fish .   I am restricted to flat banks and still water  -  no rock-hopping, no hill-stream trouting,  no fly-fishing,  and definitely no wading.  Still, I have had 80 years of that, so can't complain (started fishing in 1940 , by myself, using tackle I made myself)  We take a holiday each year in a narrowboat so I get to fish/trot/spin/lever all day and everyday for a fortnight , so all is not lost. -  in fact life is pretty good when I am not actually having an angina attack.  I try to fish one day a week during the summer,  but winter conditions clobber my inefficient circulation so have had to give that up also.   Will close now but keep in touch .  Best fishes to all.

    • Like 2
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