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Vagabond

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Vagabond last won the day on October 12

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About Vagabond

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  • Birthday 05/13/1934

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    East Sussex
  • Interests
    Angling, Ichthyology

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  1. Interesting discussion. As an all-rounder, fishing all over the world,I own a lot of reels, from big game down through various multipliers (boat and surfcasting ) baitcasters, spincasters,closed face reels, fixed spools, (most with bale arms, my old Mitchell with claw pick-up) centrerpins and fly reels from #12 for tarpon down to a #2 for brooklet fishing. I had to learn to be reasonably proficient with all of them, but always concentrated on accuracy rather than distance, especially on the small freshwater waters I was brought up on. For sea fishing with multipliers i prefer righthand wind, but for most freshwater work I use lefthand wind because the master hand (my righthand) is of more use in controlling the rod. The odd one out is baitcasting - my smaller reels are of the " spincaster " closed-face variety with lefthand wind - but my larger ones are multipliers, and because they were purchased in the USA are righthand wind. It has never bothered me, I cast with right hand , and as the lure drops into the water I automatically switch the rod to my left hand to wind in righthanded.. Have always fished that way - each to his own preference
  2. That is exactly what I was implying in my reference to "agriculture" but the northward spread of the Great Egret is less easily explained. Its first breeding recorded in the UK was about 2012, and there have been several instances since, There may well be factors involved other than temperature change, but so far nothing credible has been suggested
  3. There has been a similar argument re cattle egrets. but that can be discounted in that cattle egrets are spreading worldwide into all sorts of wetland and agricultural habitats Towards, parallel to and away from the equator. However, the recent northward spread of the Great Egret is less easily explained except by global warming. There is no doubt that Earth is at the moment getting warmer - the climate of Earth has been changing ever since it was formed some 4.6 billion years ago - as Chesters said, sometimes getting warmer, sometimes getting cooler. Whether man can do anything about it is another matter. A logician might suggest reducing the human population back to that of the Palaeocene, but I can't see that view becoming popular
  4. Juliet Kaplan, Actress Better known as Pearl in "Last of the Summer Wine" - wife of the hapless Howard
  5. "Come neighbours all ,both great and small , Come listen to me here, I tell of a maid who was waylaid, By a Common Marketeer He wooed her with fair promises of foreign wines and grub, Then sad to say he had his way, and left her in the club"
  6. Owned a small sailing dinghy for many years, Found that you could sail it, or fish from it , but not both at the same time ! When fishing, left sails and mast behind, pulled the centre-board up, and relied on oars.
  7. Answer to the "water in hollow plastics wagglers" Make your own wagglers from a length of peacock quill - different lengths for different shot loads They last for ever.......
  8. Robert John ("Bob") Church aged 83 Chevin and I had the privilege of fishing with Bob in the days before he became well-known for his tackle company and international fly fisherman. He was a keen coarse fisherman then, along with with his fellow members of the Northampton Specimen Group - I can remember an outing to Billing Aquadrome with some of them, including that most interesting character, Fred Wagstaffe, later of pike fishing fame. I seem well on course to be last man standing from that era, but Chevin at least is still with us AFAIK
  9. Live fauna Squid (several sorts), octopus, lobster, crab, spider crab, mussel, goose barnacle, various sea anemones, usually attached to small rock, Various bits of various jellyfish freshwater mussel, crayfish (native and signal) terrapin, saltwater crocodile. swan, great crested grebe, frog, mallard, swallow (dry fly, on backcast ) pipistrelle bat (ditto) Dead fauna Skate skeleton, rat, cat, Live flora About 10 % of that listed in Plants of the World (including most of the world's seaweeds) Dead flora Similar 10% plus many mangrove roots Inaminate Two made up rod,reel and line outfits, bed chair, kettle, various tin cans, rags, small attache case, bottomless bucket, very old keep-net. Oh, and one made up carp oufit with live 5 lb carp attached, deliberately snagged the rod with a Mepps No 3 - the small boy who had left his rod unattended didn't say "fanks mister", only wanted to know if the fish counted in his match weight That's not an exhaustive list, just what I can recall off the top of my head
  10. I found, at the waterside, a pair of stainless steel artery forceps which were CAMOUFLAGED. (which is presumably why the previous owner had failed to find them) Scraped the paint off, they are now gleaming silver. Find lots of fancy floats also, Keep them in my tackle box but have never found a use for them (see porcupine quill thread)
  11. My "go to" float for short range still water fishing (ie up to a couple of rod lengths) A splash of paint on the tip (fluo orange , yellow, scarlet or matt black according to background and lighting) and a slice of cycle valve rubber each end. Sorted Guaranteed to go down. Home made Quill (porcupine, peacock, goose, pigeon and crow) or cork on quill form 90% of my floats - tackle dealers eat your hearts out.
  12. WT Sea-eagles go for mullet in summer and things like turnstones and dunlin in winter - should make a few "conservationists" tick
  13. Polaris is great for fishing at range in gravel pits with many bars and hollows. Not just float legering, but float paternoster also, so that your bait is a fixed distance from the bottom, whatever the depth - a method particularly good for perch.
  14. Don;t confuse the issue with facts -their minds are made up !
  15. Vagabond

    Ebola

    There is an old saying about bolting horses and (unbolted) stable doors. Nobody thinks it will happen until it does.
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