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#11 Anderoo

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 11:06 AM

That darstadly cad Steve W tricked me into using sight indicators. Before that I was a proud and noble fly angler, able to hold my head high and my heart pure. Now I am a shell of a man, twisted and cruel. But I catch LOTS more trout now :)

The ability to hold your flies at a specific depth together with instant indication of a take makes the method really effective. It also makes you realise how many times your flies are taken and spat out when you don't use one! I first tried using one while fishing at Farmoor with Steve, and have since also used one at a little Thames tributary to fool a wild brown that was taking mayfly nymphs a few inches under the surface. Without the indicator, and with a turbulent surface, I couldn't tell when the fly had been taken.

The result was this fine fellow:
Posted Image

For flies, buzzers are the clear favourite, but I have also picked up fish on little hare's ears and pheasant tails, and also various sedge patterns.

Some takes are rod-wrenchers, but most are like float fishing - you have to strike at the right moment, which can result in coffee poured down your lap and sandwiches dropped in the lake :headhurt:
And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music

#12 Tony U

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 11:27 AM

Anderoo
I would not feel too guilty about the Thames tributary fish; sight indicators were developed for just that scenario. It is when you see anglers fishing with indicators the size of pike bungs, that can be seen from the fishery car park, in small put and take waters that gets me mad. Why can't they just watch the end of their floating flyline and adjust the leader length and weight of fly to account for the depth.
Tony

Edited by Tony U, 11 January 2011 - 11:28 AM.

Tony

After a certain age, if you don't wake up aching in every joint, you are probably dead.


#13 Anderoo

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 11:37 AM

Anderoo
I would not feel too guilty about the Thames tributary fish; sight indicators were developed for just that scenario. It is when you see anglers fishing with indicators the size of pike bungs, that can be seen from the fishery car park, in small put and take waters that gets me mad. Why can't they just watch the end of their floating flyline and adjust the leader length and weight of fly to account for the depth.
Tony


The same reason people fish tiny ponds full of small carp with 3 strong rods, bite alarms and big pit reels... :headhurt:

When I subscribed to online fishing TV, I watched all the New Zealand fly fishing videos on there - fishing for big, wild trout in really remote, rocky, shallow rivers and streams. A sight indicator is a key part of their nymphing.
And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music

#14 Steve Walker

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 12:17 PM

That darstadly cad Steve W tricked me into using sight indicators. Before that I was a proud and noble fly angler, able to hold my head high and my heart pure. Now I am a shell of a man, twisted and cruel. But I catch LOTS more trout now :)


This is my new fly fishing outfit:

Posted Image

Mwah ha ha ha!

#15 Newt

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 02:28 PM

Balsa wood body - generally called "popping bugs" because the concave face will make a nice little popping sound when you twitch it.

Posted Image

Posted Image
" My choices in life were either to be a piano player in a whore house or a politician. And to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference!" - Harry Truman, 33rd US President

#16 Steve Walker

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 04:02 PM

Aren't those sometimes spun deer hair, Newt?

#17 Newt

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 04:32 PM

Popping Bugs - the ones I've used all have a similar body of balsa with the concave front surface so you can twitch them and it will make a slight noise and disturb the water a little. The dressing is usually some sort of inexpensive feathers. They can be fished single but for bluegills are normally used with a sinking dropper fly under them. Takes tend to be about 5-1 or 10-1 on the dropper but a hit on the bug is certainly more exciting.

For bluegills, the normal dropper is a foam black ant body with white rubber legs and the generic term for them is breamer - probably because members of the sunfish family the bluegill belongs to are usually called Bream over here although there are easily a half-dozen or more different fish in this area and over most of the southern US.
" My choices in life were either to be a piano player in a whore house or a politician. And to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference!" - Harry Truman, 33rd US President

#18 Anderoo

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 04:43 PM

Not to be confused with Pooping Bugs, which are more related to excess amounts of red wine and lamb madras <_<
And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music

#19 Steve Walker

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 05:08 PM

I was thinking of this kind of thing:

Posted Image

Youtube Video ->Original Video

Youtube Video ->Original Video


#20 Leon Roskilly

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 11:10 AM

Thanks for your replies guys.

There's some interesting things to think about and to try there.

I've ordered some of the Grauval line (9lbs, I was going to go higher as well, but I will wait and see what I think of it first).

And I've got a whole box of boobies (part of an ebay purchase) to decorate the trees around the lakes I fish, and the grass behind me :)

So, I'm thinking of starting with a booby on the point and a couple of buzzers on droppers.

Which leads me to another question, is it better to fish identical buzzers, or two different ones to see which the trout prefer?

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