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South Tyne Trout, do they get bigger?


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I had some fun catching small 5inch trout on the south tyne this weekend, it was crystal clear, which may explain why I only caught small ones, but I wondered whether all the trout went to sea or if some stay in the river?

 

I assume the latter as the river wear seems to have a mix, but as the only larger trout I've seen have been sea trout I thought I should ask the experts......and since I couldn't find any, I thought of you lot :D

 

cheers (assuming after the above you respond)

phil,

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Yoxer, even i struggled to interpret that,

yes the mackrel will be here soon, but I do need to have an idea about them trout. I hoped Bruno or Alan Roe may have a clue?

phil,

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Hi Phil,

 

It’s an interesting one this. When is a brown trout not a brown trout – when it’s a sea trout? Sea trout, brown trout, slob trout are all one and the same fish. For some reason (probably only known to him upstairs) a brown trout has the sudden urge to visit pastures new - feed better, sun, sea & sangria I don’t know but they do, and off to sea they go – they do have to undergo some sort of a biological change to compensate for the density change from fresh water to salt I don’t know the mechanism.

 

So where are all the large trout, probably tucked under the bank as in my experience on rain fed rivers its usually late evening that consistent catch’s of larger fish are made. Are you sure that these small trout were in fact trout, as salmon smolts will be starting to head to sea around this time?

 

On one of the rivers I fish its common to catch large brownies (4lbs plus) early in the season yet they disappear after May never to be seen again until the following April. Are these well mended kelts that are just fattening up in the river before making the transition to the sea again – I don’t know and other people I ask not sure either.

 

I do suspect that brown trout will stay in a river until hunger forces them to put to sea and they change to the sea trout derivative. The reverse may also be true that low food stocks at sea forces the sea trout to revert back to brown trout.

 

Lots of unanswered and imponderables with this question it would be interesting to illicit a response from on of our learned fishy biologists on this for a more definitive answer – it there is one.

 

Duncan

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So how do you identify a Sea Trout as opposed to a Brown Trout when the former returns to it's river? I would guess that it would be because the fish will lose it's brown pigmentation but having never seen one in the flesh I wouldn't know although I have wondered about this for a long time now.

Paul

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The few sea trout I've seen caught have been far more silvery, not the brown/green backed fish I'm more used to. I know you wont see many on the river air at silsden

 

Hi duncan, long time no hear, the small fish I've caught have been trout, there are salmon in the south tyne but they're a rarer fish than in the North Tyne. I also assumed that it was just my fishing skills which were lacking in finding larger specimens, but the reasoning as to why some trout go to sea when others don't does intrigue me.

 

[ 26. April 2003, 01:16 PM: Message edited by: phil dean ]

phil,

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seems to me that your wrong regarding trout and sea trout... a sea trout has nothing whatso ever to do with a brownie. different kettle of fish alltogether

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quote:


seems to me that your wrong regarding trout and sea trout... a sea trout has nothing whatso ever to do with a brownie. different kettle of fish alltogether

 


How's that then?

Paul

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Like you Tinca, I'm somewhat surprised with that comment. On the basis that Duncan is a pretty informed guy, treasurer of "The Grayling Society" I think, and as I've been told this by no less than Paul Young (via his program to be honest, but it sounded good) I'll stick to it until told otherwise by someone "in the know".

 

Has anyone seen a fisheries expert recently, goes by the name of BRUNO???

 

If you are out there Dr Broughton, any chance of a comment please??

phil,

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