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fishing worm for game fish


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#1 mike1234

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 01:04 PM

i know a lot of enthusiasts arent keen on non-fly/lure fishermen having a go

but i have never done any fly fishing before and have been invited to go fishing with some friends at a lake containing trout(brownies, rainbows, american brool trout) that allows ledgered worm

anyone have any tips (apart from learn how to fly fish properly lol)

i have heard that using polystrene to lift the worm from the bottom works well but i dont know what to look for in a good swim unless i am looking for tench/carp/bream

if anyone can give me any tips it would be much appreciated

cheers

mike

#2 IanR

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 02:51 PM

Trout rarely feed hard on the bottom, so put the weight at the bottom of the line, and the worm on a snood line about three or four feet above it; effectively a paternoster.

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Work the worms through sphagnum moss first.

Sweetcorn works as well :)


Cheers

Ian.

Edited by IanR, 12 February 2008 - 02:54 PM.


#3 lutra

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 09:54 PM

Sweetcorn works as well :)


Yes sweetcorn's good. Don't know what the rules are on your chosen water but big lumps of bread are good too as it seems to be a visual thing with trout. You can strike it off to get the swim going if loose feeding is banned too, or better still take some PVA bags of trout pellets in your pocket (but that didn't come from me). :ph34r:
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#4 phil dean

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 03:22 PM

trout will eat anything, but to give your worm a bit more interest jerk it back once cast out, the rising up of the bait when pulled often buys a bite from a fish which was otherwise ignoring your bait.

On the other hand, borrow a mate's rod and have a go on the fly, it can be great fun and an ability to cast a long distance is not essential, use your fish finding skills (cast under overhangs, near snags etc) and you will probably have luck.

I often watch in amazment at anglers casting lines long distances out with no idea what they're casting to, my best rainbow was hooked 2ft from the bank.
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#5 peterthefisherman

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 06:43 PM

The tactics you use for bream with maggot or worm - would be a decent start point - esp if you are able to use a maggot feeder
I would be happier with my bait on the bottom and static - however we all find success in different ways,

Peter
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#6 chuby

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 09:05 PM

I used to fish any method on the Reservoirs at Hammersmith back in the seventies,before taking up fly fishing.
Bear in mind,as the water warms,the fish will be higher in the water.Bright sun can push them down though.Float fishing with worm used to be productive.Just alter depth if nothing forthcoming.As stated above,try the margins rather than hurling anything out as far as you can from the off.
Personally,unless the water is very cold,i would go with the float as opposed to ledgering.

#7 Snatcher

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 01:41 AM

Oh well all ethics out of the window just ledger a boobie at mid water

This is one I have devised for bass fishing in Luce Bay



Posted Image

I tied it on a 4/0 hook


Try tying a similar beastie on a size 8 or 6 for the troots!!

You could be boring and fish all day with with a pheasant tailed nymph or a damsel nymph. You could be really uncouth and fish a daddy on floating line whilst having your sarnies ;)

The choice is yours and enjoy your day and give us a report :)


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#8 Moggy

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 09:52 AM

There's a lot of snobbery surrounding game fishing...ignore it! There's no doubt that a good fat lobworm will kill more trout/seatrout/salmon than any other method! I usually fish fly, but that's just a personal preference. You can do worse than fishing a fat worm or two (The more movement the better) under a light-ish float. Don't bother shotting...no need, and the more naturally the bait falls through the water the better! If the float isn't allowed put on 2-3 worms to give a bit of weight, cast it alongside weed beds, and do a slow retrieve. Let it sink a few feet, then slowly reel in 5-6 turns, let it drop again and repeat.

For a visual focus, you can tie a three inch piece of red wool immediately above the hook, and/or cover the point of the hook with a piece of bread. The depth they're feeding at will differ with the weather....general rule of thumb is fish deep in cold weather, further up in the water when it's warmer. As with Coarse fishing, fish up against weed, or lilies...that's where any natural feed will be.

You're probably aware of this already, but change your bait as often as you can...a mobile bait will always attract better than a limp one.

Tight lines!

Edited by Moggy, 21 February 2008 - 09:57 AM.


#9 phil dean

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 02:51 PM

i find prawn gets more salmon than worm Moggy, and maggots can be killers for sea trout and trout when other baits fail. A swimfeeder full of maggots has delivered a numbr of good salmon in the past.

I don't know about you, but for me the joy of fly fishing comes from catching something with as little paraphanalia as possible, i get a similar pleasure from a freelined worm fished as you described.

there's also a certain joy from catching something with a fly you've tied yourself or was a gift from someone.

Edited by phil dean, 21 February 2008 - 02:51 PM.

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#10 Moggy

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 03:37 PM

i find prawn gets more salmon than worm Moggy, and maggots can be killers for sea trout and trout when other baits fail. A swimfeeder full of maggots has delivered a numbr of good salmon in the past.

I don't know about you, but for me the joy of fly fishing comes from catching something with as little paraphanalia as possible, i get a similar pleasure from a freelined worm fished as you described.

there's also a certain joy from catching something with a fly you've tied yourself or was a gift from someone.


Yes Phil...with you all the way. I tie all my own apart from swaps I occasionally make, and even though I know I'll (On average) catch less than if I was worming, there is a certain satisfaction gained from landing a fish on your own creation, as you say. And there's nothing quite like having an angry couple of kilos of sea trout on a #5-6 to get the adrenaline flowing!

Do you fish cooked prawn? I've tried uncooked with good results when I lived in Norway, but they're not so easy to get hold of here in Denmark. Maggot is something I rarely use these days...again...difficult to source, though I do breed a few in the summer months...but I've never really given them a good go. I'll try that this summer.

We're dead lucky this year...we've had more salmon and trout returning than ever before. But that's been down to rigourous catch and release policy over the last 5 years, and the release of about 125.000 smolt every year.
Moggy