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I caught this tench several weeks ago and at the time thought it was a skinny female. Now I'm not sure. What do you think?

 

 

And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music

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I can see why you are not certain. Although it has not got the muscle structure normally associated with males the size of the paddles relative to the body would in my opinion lean more toward a male than a female. Nice one

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Guest tigger
I caught this tench several weeks ago and at the time thought it was a skinny female. Now I'm not sure. What do you think?

 

 

 

 

I reckon a male with little Tincas. :mellow:

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Male shaped and sized fins but no muscle above them. Ive caught small males before where the muscles arnt pronounced but not at that size.So Im not really sure.I think I would have called it female if I was deciding on a male PB though.

And thats my "non indicative opinion"!

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I think it's a female as well. The muscles above the pelvic and pectoral fins are usually much more pronounced. It might be an office worker though.

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Andrew,

 

There was a thread on the Tenchfishers Members forum earlier this month about exactly the same thing. The best advice was . . . .

 

There are three tests for a male tench:

 

1) The length of the pelvic (or ventral) fins. In male fish these will at least reach the anal opening and often will go beyond it by a few millimeters.

2) The thickness of the leading edge (more properly the second ray) of theses same fins.

3) The pelvic bumps or ridges which are generally visible.

 

Dorsal and caudal fins are often larger than in female fish but these are not reliable indicators.

 

Males can be a bit difficult to spot - particularly in younger fish . Generally the indicators of maleness become more pronounced as the fish gets older.

 

You don't say how big it was but it looks quite young. I suspect it is a male that will acquire more "maleness" as it grows older. You see, the 'muscles' that are normally seen just above the ventral (pelvic) fins are the male reproductive organs and develop as the fish matures.

 

Regards,

 

Steve C.

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