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danie1

Where to buy trout?

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Hi

I am interested in having some trout in one of my ponds.

Does anyone know where I can buy live trout from in small quanties south of London?

Thanks

Daniel

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Guest Ferret1959

Why trout?

Is your pond quite big?

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Hi

I am interested in having some trout in one of my ponds.

Does anyone know where I can buy live trout from in small quanties south of London?

Thanks

Daniel

 

I haven't got a clue about round London but up here in the north most trout farms seem quite happy to sell a few. I believe some pike anglers use them as livebaits :rolleyes: If you turn up with a bucket and an aerator I doubt if they will refuse you, business is business!

Just Google trout farm london and see which is closest to you.

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there is a trout farm just outside of guildford its could tillingbourne trout farm dont know if its any good? i think to keep trout you really need to have a bigish pond

Edited by egbert

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there is a trout farm just outside of guildford its could tillingbourne trout farm dont know if its any good? i think to keep trout you really need to have a bigish pond

 

sounds like a good idea :thumbs: i might have a go are they easy to look after ?how much are they to buy my local fishery barlow lakes breeds them


my favourite fishing spot

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chesterfield canal chesterfield

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sounds like a good idea :thumbs: i might have a go are they easy to look after ?how much are they to buy my local fishery barlow lakes breeds them

i have no idea how to look after them i only fish for them :rolleyes: i'm not evan sure you can purchase them from there they may only breed them for the lakes that are near by give em' a ring

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I think about 20 quid for 100 fish, but that is for inch long fish I think - not much more than fry - but if you get a good survival rate then it's excellent value.

 

I think for trout the pond needs plenty of aeration - some big koi piston driven aerators are probably a good idea.


Ian W

 

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Problems with keeping trout in ponds:

 

1. Trout have a high oxygen requirement. You may get around this with aeration.

2. Trout have a low tolerance for ammonia/nitrite. A good, koi-standard filtration setup and fairly low stocking density should get round this.

3. Trout have a low upper lethal temperature. Rainbow trout will start to die at 25-26 degrees, and will suffer with daily average temperature over about 20. There is a review of this data here. The numbers are similar for brown trout. You can only really get round this by having a pond large and deep enough that some areas stay cool enough for the fish to find refuge.

4. Trout are highly predatory. They will fin-nip and, once big enough, eat, anything else you put in with them.

5. Trout will jump. I tried keeping some small brownies in a pond when I was a kid, and we lost a few because they jumped out and landed on the lawn, and a few others because they gill-netted themselves in the mesh I put over the pond to stop them doing this. We gradually lost the rest of them over the ensuing summer.

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You have to have the right environment for any creature, certainly don't trout on a whim in bad conditions.

 

When people come in to buy fish of me the first thing I ask is how big is the environment. A chap was interested in one of my large koi last week, when I asked him how big his pond was it turned out to be 8' long 4' wide and the deepest part was 18", the fish was for sale at £230 but I did not sell it to him and told him his pond was not suitable for koi.

 

I don't stock goldfish bowls as they are not suitable for fish of any type.

 

For trout you need at worse a very large pond with at least one good area 6' plus deep, but better to think in terms of a lake which is at least an 1/8 of an acre with 8' depth of water.


I fish, I catches a few, I lose a few, BUT I enjoys. Anglers Trust PM

 

eat.gif

 

http://www.petalsgardencenter.com

 

Petals Florist

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A chap was interested in one of my large koi last week, when I asked him how big his pond was it turned out to be 8' long 4' wide and the deepest part was 18", the fish was for sale at £230 but I did not sell it to him and told him his pond was not suitable for koi.

 

Good on you. Some people have more money than sense.

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