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Leadcore or Tubing ?


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This is amazing....simple fact is that sometime or other and for whatever reason your line will snap. If you are using leadcore then a fish can/will/and actually do ((I have landed at least 3 fish this year towing leadcore), end up dragging it around.

 

Tubing will slip off and leave just the line being towed (had a few of them as well this year)

Lesser of 2 evils is to use tubing, but then it is a bit more difficult to set up or change rigs with tubing, isn't it, and when half the new generation can't even tie up their own rigs, leadcore with its loops already tied for them is ideal..............pure laziness..

 

Den

 

Tubing can also trap air in it which then renders it useless, the whole point of using lead core/ tubing is to pin it down to the botom of the lake bed if tubing gets air trapped in it it will then float.

 

i don't see how it can be dangerouse if an angler knows how to attach it correctly, and uses a good main line to attach it too and is a good angler all round, i personally think if you splice your own lead core to your main line it's actually much safer and stronger than buying the ready made stuff which you attach loop to loop.

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I use both and to be honest the nash leadcore is a little rough but its diameter makes it nigh on imposible to damage fish with. Tubing on the other hand whilst initially seeming more fish friendly has the problem of coming adrift leaving the line exposed and this does lead to scales being lifted (one of the reasons i use lead core) however when there is a chance of fish possibly ending up with a rig due to snapping and the only reason for this is some underwater structure causing this when you are plying the fish tubing is the only way to go as it can come free of the line (it wont always do it try lettting it slide of a slack line) the esp anchor tubng is probably one of the worst for 'sticking' to a line so i use the largest bore i can find which was carp are us tubing and blob tungstern putty to it. So for me its a simple choice really if im certain that what im fishing in is clear leadcore if unsure or know of snags to be present tubing and no flying backleads etc as they put your line in cntact with the things your trying to avoid in the 1st place.

Strangley noone seems to use LIGHTER hooklenths than there main line any more or to be concerned that it may be our choice of hooklength causing damage to the fish

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I use both and to be honest the nash leadcore is a little rough but its diameter makes it nigh on imposible to damage fish with. Tubing on the other hand whilst initially seeming more fish friendly has the problem of coming adrift leaving the line exposed and this does lead to scales being lifted (one of the reasons i use lead core) however when there is a chance of fish possibly ending up with a rig due to snapping and the only reason for this is some underwater structure causing this when you are plying the fish tubing is the only way to go as it can come free of the line (it wont always do it try lettting it slide of a slack line) the esp anchor tubng is probably one of the worst for 'sticking' to a line so i use the largest bore i can find which was carp are us tubing and blob tungstern putty to it. So for me its a simple choice really if im certain that what im fishing in is clear leadcore if unsure or know of snags to be present tubing and no flying backleads etc as they put your line in cntact with the things your trying to avoid in the 1st place.

Strangley noone seems to use LIGHTER hooklenths than there main line any more or to be concerned that it may be our choice of hooklength causing damage to the fish

 

I have never had a problem with my rig tubing coming adrift, if your using correct tail rubbers, it should stay put ok, I agree, only use flying back leads if the lake bed is right, as you could be making matters worse, and agree also hooklink material and length can be an issue, not only for fish safety as discussed, but also hooking in the right part of the fishes mouth.

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just lost a post no idea how

Right if the tubing doesnt move easily the tail rubber its attached to doesnt move as freely so yes you can get them to fit quite tight but that is then reducing the chances of the lead being ejected so I try to make sure everthing comes apart with ease, oh and I test it dry not wet

so it should come apart easier in the water.

Why did youy get grief Budgie over the lower bs hooklenth?

Maybe not everyone in here but around my way It has seemed that for snag fishing 10lb mono to a 25lb coated hooklenth on a helicopter set up seems to be the safest rig for snag fishing

and to think I was threatened for using tether rigs were my lead was tied with 2.5lb mono to a swivel

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just lost a post no idea how

Right if the tubing doesnt move easily the tail rubber its attached to doesnt move as freely so yes you can get them to fit quite tight but that is then reducing the chances of the lead being ejected so I try to make sure everthing comes apart with ease, oh and I test it dry not wet

so it should come apart easier in the water.

Why did youy get grief Budgie over the lower bs hooklenth?

Maybe not everyone in here but around my way It has seemed that for snag fishing 10lb mono to a 25lb coated hooklenth on a helicopter set up seems to be the safest rig for snag fishing

and to think I was threatened for using tether rigs were my lead was tied with 2.5lb mono to a swivel

 

Not true Noodle, if you push the rubber to far down the lead clip and with out wetting first it won't eject the lead easy, it's free running on the mainline, so if the mainline run's free through the tail rubber and tubing, it doesn't matter if the tube fits tight in the tail rubber, it's how tight the rubber is on the clip that makes the difference, mind you if the tube in the rubber was so tight it squashed it against the mainline to stop it moving, you would get that problem, but thats a bad match of tube and rubber then. Correct use of rubber and tube + lead clips and the swivel that fits in the clips and good quality ones at that, will not give you a problem, it's what they are designed for, try watching the Korda underwater DVD's some good ideas and advice there and all on film underwater.

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trevor reread my post please i do it dy 1st to make sure it releases as if it does the job dry, how much easiere will it be when lubricated?

Budgie lost for words mate really am and thats coming from someone who has disagreed with you (over the singles for pike I think)

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trevor reread my post please i do it dy 1st to make sure it releases as if it does the job dry, how much easiere will it be when lubricated?

Budgie lost for words mate really am and thats coming from someone who has disagreed with you (over the singles for pike I think)

 

Wasn't disputing the wet or dry bit, it's the fact with correct size tubing and a good fit in the tail rubber, it should not hamper lead ejection, only tail rubber to tight on the clip will and swivel too loose in the clip is not good, as it pulls out the clip, rather than eject the lead, thus allowing the tube/clip and lead to all move up the mainline, thats why we now have the Korda Hybrid lead clips and the Amarlead lock jaws etc. I tent to use all Korda end tacle now, as in tubing,clips, tail rubbers, quick link and wide gape hooks, as they might be a bit dearer, but they do the job well and I don't encounter problems with them.

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