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I used leadcore last year and had almost constant line bites, if I'd not had Steve's longdrop bobbins I'd have stuck at half of them, some lifted the bobbin over a foot!

 

Rich

 

I don't know much about Wingham, so can i ask where you fishing in or over a lot of shallow water?


 

A tiger does not lose sleep over the opinion of sheep

 

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Over the years I too have abbandoned the "traditional" long hooklinks for bream.I now prefer a much shorter set up. Although bolt rigs certainly work for bream most bream guys still prefer the running rig as it gives you a much better indication of whats happening with your bait in regards to small fish nibbling it away.Obviously not a problem for boillie users but when using the likes of casters,bread or worms you dont really want to have a bare hook sat out there do you.

 

The question of the long drop on bobbins and line bites has all ready been answered.I will just add that some times the difference between a liner and a true bite is only an extra inch and thats after a lift of nearly 3'.

 

Keeping line pinned to the bottom is certainly the way ahead just that if your fishing over a large bed of bait this can be very difficult. Not only is it line "floating" above the bottom that they catch but also when they have their heads down they can burrow under line oin the vbottom whilst searching out/feeding on the bait and when they lift up right again give the line bite.

 

Another reason I still try to keep my bobbins as light as possible is that they can giveliners like this without being spooked.Im sure that if the resistance at the rod end (be it from a heavy bite indicater or one with only a small range of movemrnt) was to high this would spook them a lot more.


And thats my "non indicative opinion"!

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Guest tigger
I used leadcore last year and had almost constant line bites, if I'd not had Steve's longdrop bobbins I'd have stuck at half of them, some lifted the bobbin over a foot!

 

Rich

 

 

 

What about a bolt rig and back leads,maybe with the back leads pinning your line to the bottom line bites would be much fewer. If you hook a fish on a bolt rig then you can leave it that bit longer to make sure that it's not a line bite before picking up your rod.

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Also for those you who havnt fished for big bream. Please dont make the mistake of trying to compare any experiences youve had with "small" bream to true "big bream" I now can say 100% that big bream (and the marker for that IMO is 14-15lb) behave a lot lot different to small (8-12lb) fish.I make this devide because of the following.I have fished waters which have had massive shoals of 8lb+ bream.You can get some amazing bags by real heavy groundbaiting and drawing in and holdind (albeit for a short time only) shoals of bream of this size.Thae vast majority of my doubles have come from waters like this.Despite this though it is very rare to find bream above 12lb in these types of waters.The waters Ive fished that hold the big big bream ie 14-15lb+ all have a low head of bream which either dont tend to shoaL or as there are so few the "shoals" are more like groups anyway! these big fish behave in a very different way or possibly I would be more acurate in saying require a different aproach.Its no doubt the numbers of bream ie loads in a shoal of -14s and few in the groups of +14s that indeed causes the difference in ceilling weights.

What about a bolt rig and back leads,maybe with the back leads pinning your line to the bottom line bites would be much fewer. If you hook a fish on a bolt rig then you can leave it that bit longer to make sure that it's not a line bite before picking up your rod.
I refer to the post I made re digging up of line from the bottom.

And thats my "non indicative opinion"!

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I don't know much about Wingham, so can i ask where you fishing in or over a lot of shallow water?

 

I can't remember exactly how deep it was but not very deep! The may have been deeper parts between me and the baited area too! This might explain the line bites, it seems (to me at least) that line bites from the Wingham bream are quite common however, whilst I make an effort to sink the line etc I think line bite are inevitable and with so few bream being caught you really really want to be sure what you are dealing with.

 

Anyway the bobbins are not *for* Wingham, they are just designed to be for use in almost all situations.

 

I think I've got all the pieces of the puzzle sorted now so once I've made the circuits etc I'll make the bobbins up. The only slight difficulty is the adjustable weight system as is cannot attach to the bottom of the bobbin like one would normally due to the windproof arm/cable. The weights would have to be inserted into/onto something mounted below the bobbin I have though about mounting a small box or tube below the bobbin that I can put weights etc into to make the bobbin heavier.

 

Any bright ideas?

 

Rich

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Maybe true Budgie, but a line bite will end when the line tightens and the line slips off the fish. this will happen whether you have a long or short drop. If it is a real bite it will keep going. Just because you have a 24" or 36" drop, it makes no difference...either it keeps going...a bite, or it slips off and drops back...a liner. At what point in the rising of the bobbin do you decide it is actually a real bite?

 

Another thought has occurred to me..if you have a 24" drop and the bream gets hooked and carries on feeding on your patch of feed, then you may well get a lot of indecisive movement of the bobbin, before finally moving far enough to cause you to srtike.

 

I have watched this sort of thing happening when freelining at close range.

 

 

 

I fail to see any difference betwen a small shoal of 9lb Breams behaviour (small by your reckoning) and a small shoal of bigger one of 14 lbs. Does this change occur at around 13.5 lbs? :)

 

Den

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What about a bolt rig and back leads,maybe with the back leads pinning your line to the bottom line bites would be much fewer. If you hook a fish on a bolt rig then you can leave it that bit longer to make sure that it's not a line bite before picking up your rod.

 

Yes I know but if you are gettign 3 foot liners they will still take line, I don't think either of the bream last year took much line of the baitrunner, certainly not screaming runs!

 

Rich

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Also for those you who havnt fished for big bream. Please dont make the mistake of trying to compare any experiences youve had with "small" bream to true "big bream" I now can say 100% that big bream (and the marker for that IMO is 14-15lb) behave a lot lot different to small (8-12lb) fish.I make this devide because of the following.I have fished waters which have had massive shoals of 8lb+ bream.You can get some amazing bags by real heavy groundbaiting and drawing in and holdind (albeit for a short time only) shoals of bream of this size.Thae vast majority of my doubles have come from waters like this.Despite this though it is very rare to find bream above 12lb in these types of waters.The waters Ive fished that hold the big big bream ie 14-15lb+ all have a low head of bream which either dont tend to shoaL or as there are so few the "shoals" are more like groups anyway! these big fish behave in a very different way or possibly I would be more acurate in saying require a different aproach.Its no doubt the numbers of bream ie loads in a shoal of -14s and few in the groups of +14s that indeed causes the difference in ceilling weights.I refer to the post I made re digging up of line from the bottom.

 

15lb+ shoal bream off Castle loch, Long town, one Lancashire lake and at least two Cheshire meres that i know of in the north-west alone.

 

OLD bream do seem to become more salutary and require a different approach. But i wouldn't recommend large patches of bait especially ground bait for bream over 6-7lb anyway, as they tend to be very reluctant to settle over this. "Been seen and done that" i think you would hear them say.


 

A tiger does not lose sleep over the opinion of sheep

 

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Also for those you who havnt fished for big bream. Please dont make the mistake of trying to compare any experiences youve had with "small" bream to true "big bream" I now can say 100% that big bream (and the marker for that IMO is 14-15lb) behave a lot lot different to small (8-12lb) fish.I make this devide because of the following.I have fished waters which have had massive shoals of 8lb+ bream.You can get some amazing bags by real heavy groundbaiting and drawing in and holdind (albeit for a short time only) shoals of bream of this size.Thae vast majority of my doubles have come from waters like this.Despite this though it is very rare to find bream above 12lb in these types of waters.The waters Ive fished that hold the big big bream ie 14-15lb+ all have a low head of bream which either dont tend to shoaL or as there are so few the "shoals" are more like groups anyway! these big fish behave in a very different way or possibly I would be more acurate in saying require a different aproach.Its no doubt the numbers of bream ie loads in a shoal of -14s and few in the groups of +14s that indeed causes the difference in ceilling weights.I refer to the post I made re digging up of line from the bottom.

 

Wouldn't want my main line in my swim full stop.

 

Limiting the number of fish between you and your rig is the real key to stopping liners.

Edited by lutra

 

A tiger does not lose sleep over the opinion of sheep

 

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I can't remember exactly how deep it was but not very deep! The may have been deeper parts between me and the baited area too! This might explain the line bites, it seems (to me at least) that line bites from the Wingham bream are quite common however, whilst I make an effort to sink the line etc I think line bite are inevitable and with so few bream being caught you really really want to be sure what you are dealing with.

 

Anyway the bobbins are not *for* Wingham, they are just designed to be for use in almost all situations.

 

I think I've got all the pieces of the puzzle sorted now so once I've made the circuits etc I'll make the bobbins up. The only slight difficulty is the adjustable weight system as is cannot attach to the bottom of the bobbin like one would normally due to the windproof arm/cable. The weights would have to be inserted into/onto something mounted below the bobbin I have though about mounting a small box or tube below the bobbin that I can put weights etc into to make the bobbin heavier.

 

Any bright ideas?

 

Rich

 

It wouldn't be deep water that would concern me, it was the thought your main line might be travelling a long way in shallow water on or just off the bottom and getting caught by passing fish.


 

A tiger does not lose sleep over the opinion of sheep

 

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