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I fish a little burn near my home it is a tidal water. Afew years ago there was a massive flood and the local fish farm lost a lot of rainbow trout into this burn. The part of the burn i like to fish floods with the tide and every time the tide comes in so do these fish. Some are quite large 5-7 pounds but mostly they are 1-3 pounds. I think that a large number of the rainbows that escaped are living in the sea just of the burns mouth and they have become the equivilent of the seatrout. They are a stunning silver with a beutifull blue back. Could they be steelheads? Id post a pic but there is no attachments on here that i can see. I could email it if thats allowed.

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mmc1 - email it to me at newt.vail@pmusa.com or nvail@ctc.net and I'll set it up and send you back a link you can post that will display the pic.

" My choices in life were either to be a piano player in a whore house or a politician. And to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference!" - Harry Truman, 33rd US President

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I suppose they must be, albeit that maybe they may have needed to head off to sea by instinct as opposed to being washed out. Either way it's a fantastic fishing opportunity for you.

Paul

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Tinca61:

 Either way it's a fantastic fishing opportunity for you.

Right. I'm envious.............and curious, as there seem to be no obvious spots on tail or fin, and just a few black spots on the body. (perhaps there is a FAINT suggestion of spots on the tail though)

 

The head looks like a rainbow's head sure enough.

 

So can I ask our American/Canadian friends if steelheads lose the spots on the fins and tail when they go to sea? I've not been fortunate enough to see a live steelhead, but perhaps a visit to British Columbia later this year will put that right.

 

 

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"Nothing matters very much, few things matter at all" - Plato

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mmc1, a very intriguing situation, I,m very envious.

Google Image has pages full of steelhead trout pics.

I suggest you go and have a look.

 

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"I gotta go where its warm, I gotta fly to saint somewhere "

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Nightwing's your man for that and I posted a link to this thread where he hopefully will see it soon.

" My choices in life were either to be a piano player in a whore house or a politician. And to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference!" - Harry Truman, 33rd US President

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Hiya, I would say it's a Steelhead,our local fishery at Swanswater has a stock of them, check out the gallery and see the one I caught for comparison, they fight like heck. To have a head of wild fish is a dream come true.

Cheers

Norrie.

 

Vagabond, if you want to catch one give the fishery a call, its only a couple of hours from Davy's.

In sleep every dog dreams of food,and I, a fisherman,dream of fish..

Theocritis..

For Fantastic rods,and rebuilds. http://www.alba-rods.co.uk/

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You, sir, have steelhead! A steelhead is a migratory rainbow trout, living in the sea or large lakes, and ascending rivers to spawn. Regardless of their origins, the fish you are targeting are by definition, steelhead. The metalic blue and chrome color is typical of the fish while they live in the open water(we call fish fresh from the open water "chromers"). They take on the typical rainbow color after a few days or weeks back in the rivers. As far as the spots on the fins go, that is variable from one fish to another, and one strain of rainbow to another. Some have them, a few don't, and when they are in full chrome coloration, the spots often become difficult to see anyway. They are among my favorite fish, I am blessed enough to live withing a few miles of several world class steelhead streams. Be glad of the opportunity you have, cherish it, as the fish have a lifespan of about 4-7 years.

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