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Want to start fishing, puzzled about gear

fishing gear equipment new starting coarse feeder rod ledger

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#1 sp12

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 05:39 PM

Hi all, as the title suggests I'm looking to get into fishing but after a few days of looking at what to buy I'm still none the wiser.

 

I live in Worcester right next to a good stretch of the river Severn, so for the location I'm sorted. It's fast flowing, narrow in parts and at the moment it's quite low. People have suggested float fishing to start with but I thought that was hard to do on fast moving stretches of water? I very much like the sound of feeder fishing so I've been looking at those types of rods.

 
This is a rod that I've come across quite a bit. Am I right in thinking that feeder fishing and ledgering can be done on the same rod as they both use a quiver tip to register bites?

 

http://www.fishtec.c...r-banshee-11-13'-allrounder-rod/40/yes/56207

 

Other then the rod I haven't got very far because I'm not sure what I'll need, it says it comes with a reel but is that pre-loaded with line or do you generally buy that separately? 

 

I'd go down to my local tackle shop but it isn't very local and it's awkward to get to. My budget can be up to around £300 all-in so if you have any suggestions or advice I'd very much welcome them. My license just arrived in the post and I can't wait to get started. Obviously I'll stick around if you need me to answer any questions..

 

Thanks



#2 Newt

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 05:55 PM

Hi and welcome to Anglers' Net.  

 

Fishing on my side of the pond is so different that I can't help much with your questions except to say that if you do buy a reel with line preloaded, you probably should strip it off and respool with line you've bought so you will know more about its age and condition.

 

The vast majority of our members are UK located so they should be able to give you the information you need.


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#3 Phil Adams

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 04:32 PM

Might I suggest that you Spend 50 quid of your 300 budget on books, dvds, magazines etc, watch and read these, then pop along to a tackle shop...........leave your wallet at home.....seriously.  

 

After watching and reading as much as you can, a chat with a tackle shop will make much more sense.  Tell them what you want to do and where you want to do it.  See what they have to offer, and how much they are charging for it.

 

 

From here, you wil have a far better idea as to what you want to buy.

 

 

* We can all say to you "buy XYZ with ABC" but it wont necessarily be the right gear for you.



#4 chesters1

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 06:00 PM

Please dont (as i see often) buy poker like rods and 25 lb line on huge reels "just in case" then try fishing for silver fish ,you will do little but waste your money.
Sit and think just what fish you want to catch then base your tackle choice on that ,you can always "up" your tackle later.
Although dated now some of the john Wilson books are ideal for the basic ideas of the various methods ,the complete course fisherman or go fishing techniques are some i would recomend.
The other method is to go to your local venue (if its allowed) and simply sit quietly watching fishing .
Angling goes from the almost totally unnatural to mimicking the natural as closely as possible.
Chat with the local tackle shop but beware there are unscrupulous shop owners that will sell you anything to take your money ,balanced with a great number that will only sell what they would use themself

Going by my pond tberes definately bad goings on ,some line i pick up i wouldnt use boat fishing except for traces ,and 5ft telescopic rods look really silly failing to launch a 2bb float to the nearest lilly pads 10 feet away

I am no tackle snob i havnt bought any tackle for 30 years but all i have do the jobs they are designed for .

Edited by chesters1, 30 July 2014 - 06:05 PM.

Believe NOTHING anyones says or writes unless you witness  it yourself and even then your eyes can deceive you

 

There is only one opinion i listen to ,its mine and its ALWAYS right even when its wrong

 

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#5 Andy_1984

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 12:36 AM

Thats an alright rod to start with. yup the tip registers the bite you get little taps and pulls and bumps that are not always bites though it can be fish banging about the feeder, you want to wait for the it to bend around. Have you any idea what fish you want to target or really just hoping to see what happens.

 

From what I gather you have trout, roach, chub, perch, barbel, grayling, and pike in the Severn. Despite TF Gears claim "every situation, every fish – this rod can do it all" I wouldn't use it for pike.

 

as for new line, definitely change it. The type of line you use is dictated a little by what your fishing for. barbel can get pretty big but roach are small (in comparison).

 

Daiwa Sensor is a good trusted brand, as for the breaking strain but again its really up to what you want to fish for. since you want to try feeder fishing I would go with 6lb or 8lb Sensor to give a fighting chance with the chub and barbel and if you have a spare spool for the reel some 3lb or 4lb for roach, perch, and trout.

 

Dont ignore a float though, a worm drifted along the bank and guided along into slack/slow bits of water can pick up a lot of fish especially in the calm behind a rock.


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#6 Steve Walker

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 08:38 AM

The barbel explosion in the Severn made the feeder the match winning strategy, but it was a great river for float fishing long before then and that it remains.

That combination rod will probably be a reasonable feeder rod and an indifferent (heavy, stiff) float rod, but it should be a start.

#7 Steve Walker

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 08:57 AM

From what I gather you have trout, roach, chub, perch, barbel, grayling, and pike in the Severn.

Not in all of it, though - it's a very long river! You can add eel, bream, zander, carp and dace to that list. And minnows, bleak, gudgeon, stone loach, bullhead...

I'd have thought that as far down as Worcester you aren't likely to catch many trout or any grayling. Barbel, chub, bream, roach, zander, pike?

#8 dant

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 11:30 AM

https://www.google.c...ed=0CJ4BEKYrMAQ
https://www.tackleuk...o33kxoCwhHw_wcB

I would consider starting off with an 'all rounder' type set up.
You'll have a rod that will suit your local river fishing and one that can do a good job if pushed into service for lots of different angling scenarios.
The avon (non quiver tip) section will be ok, not ideal but ok for float fishing or trotting on a river, especially if you're using a slightly heavier set up to combat strong flow or larger fish.
For that reason I would go for a 12ft rod.
It'll be fine for light carp fishing, Tench and Bream on lakes, Perching with small live or dead baits and can even be used if you fancy a go at light Summer sea fishing. I use a similar set up for estuary work for Mullet and Bass.
It will however not be the set up for fishing light lines such as 2 or 3lbs for small Roach, Rudd and Perch etc.

I would spend a bit of money on the rod and reel such as the ones above for a few reasons. Primarily, they'll be much nicer to use, there's nothing worse than using shoddy gear. Also if you decide that fishing really isn't for you there'll be more demand for them second hand. Finally, a quality rod and reel set up will be able to handle the outer limits of its uses much better than cheap kit.
You must get a decent hat too, that is an often overlooked essential. Lots of people would catch a lot more if they had invested in a decent hat!
I would then compliment the rod and reel with a decent seat, bag, landing net, unhooking mat and then all your bits and bobs.
Personally I would take advice on the rod and reel and buy them from the internet because I'm tight and then get everything else from your local tackle dealer and try and build some kind of relationship with them.
Decent actual tackle shops seem to be a dying breed, probably because people like me keep buying their rods from the internet but find a good one and you're onto a winner.

I totally agree with the suggestion of books and videos etc.
I would ask a separate question on here to get some beginners reading/viewing lists...
I reckon you could get away with £400 for a very nice set up.
I've always worked on the equation: what you would like to spend x 2 + £100.
I've found this works very nicely for my two main hobbies of fishing and cycling..

Good luck.

#9 OTIB

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 10:31 PM

Hi all, as the title suggests I'm looking to get into fishing but after a few days of looking at what to buy I'm still none the wiser.

 

I live in Worcester right next to a good stretch of the river Severn, so for the location I'm sorted. It's fast flowing, narrow in parts and at the moment it's quite low. People have suggested float fishing to start with but I thought that was hard to do on fast moving stretches of water? I very much like the sound of feeder fishing so I've been looking at those types of rods.

 
This is a rod that I've come across quite a bit. Am I right in thinking that feeder fishing and ledgering can be done on the same rod as they both use a quiver tip to register bites?

 

http://www.fishtec.c...r-banshee-11-13'-allrounder-rod/40/yes/56207

 

Other then the rod I haven't got very far because I'm not sure what I'll need, it says it comes with a reel but is that pre-loaded with line or do you generally buy that separately? 

 

I'd go down to my local tackle shop but it isn't very local and it's awkward to get to. My budget can be up to around £300 all-in so if you have any suggestions or advice I'd very much welcome them. My license just arrived in the post and I can't wait to get started. Obviously I'll stick around if you need me to answer any questions..

 

Thanks

 

 

Hi and welcome to the Angling brotherhood, your enthusiasm is very real, and you are obviously champing at the bit. OK where do we start? I live just downstream from you and the Severn can be a beast of a River,not the tranquil Sabrina we see her as now, she can be a difficult mistress and for a novice a real challenge. So I will attempt to put you on the right tracks, if I can. 

 

As you may have gathered the Severn is a good river for Barbel, if you want to try your hand for these then you need PATIENCE in bucket loads as well as bucket loads of ground bait and hemp seed.  However there are all other species as well not to mention Bream, so the choice is yours, I mainly fish for Barbel these days so go equipped to tame a VERY hard fighting fish, that is at least a Barbel Rod with a test curve of 1.75 pounds or heavier depending on the state of the River, A Wychwood Rouge rod would be a good choice at about £60. Your reel needs to be good and sturdy, I use Shimano's of the older models mainly because I like the plain black and sturdy look, a good one would be the 5000 series which can be bought off ebay for c,£50 Line would be 10/12lbs breaking strain, loaded to the lip of the spool.

 

You will need a large landing net and a good handle, such as the Drennan specialist that extends to 9 ft both would cost about £70. Along handle on the Severn is a must, the banks are steep and lethal..safety first.

 

A seat bank stick, rod rests mat, leads hooks beads, pellet/ boilies etc etc completes, almost, the set up.

 

The real problem would be how to use the kit, this is where many newcomers fall foul, if you like I would be happy to help bank side to get you started, I have plenty of all gear you could borrow before you dive in so to speak. 

 

As you are new on here they will not let you send a pm, if you want, send me a number I can contact you on via this thread.



#10 Neil G

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 12:56 PM

Second the above suggestion. I have a 1.75 Wychwood Barbel rod and it makes a fine river fishing rod where there are chub, barbell and the odd big carp present. Talking of carp it's pretty good for commercial ponds too. Couple with a Daiwa 3500/4000 series reel and you'll have a nice setup.







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