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Bye bye Scottish West Highland sea-trout


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It was Ogg and Ugg, members of the Stonehenge branch of the PAC.

Brought them up in a stone bucket - took ages :)

Let's agree to respect each others views, no matter how wrong yours may be.

 

 

Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity

 

 

 

http://www.safetypublishing.co.uk/
http://www.safetypublishing.ie/

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"There are now pike to be found in Loch Garry, Loch Loyne and waters in Wester Ross - all placed there by anglers."

 

Not these then?

 

The Lochs of Caithness, Sutherland, Orkney and Shetland were not the Lochs in question

 

[ 07. June 2005, 02:38 PM: Message edited by: Sportsman ]

Let's agree to respect each others views, no matter how wrong yours may be.

 

 

Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity

 

 

 

http://www.safetypublishing.co.uk/
http://www.safetypublishing.ie/

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Dear Argyll and Sportsman

 

Pike, and sharks, have a right, beyond that which you or I might think, or not think, to exist in this world... other than for our vicarious 'pleasure' ?

 

Source: PRETOMA

Posted by: PRETOMA - archive

Posted on: Jun 7, 2005 @ 6:09 pm[printer-friendly]

 

• • • PRESS RELEASE • • •

 

CONTACT: Randall Arauz, President PRETOMA

TEL: +(506) 241-5227

FAX: +(506) 236-6017

info@tortugamarina.org

 

 

Report Confirms Sharks Disappearing off Costa Rica

 

June 7, 2005 – San Jose, Costa Rica

According to a report released June 3, 2005 by the government of Japan at the Ninth Session of the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC), 120 Taiwanese vessels were recently conducting shark-finning operations offshore Costa Rica, Honduras and Mexico, but the abundance of shark resources in the region declined rapidly. As a result, these Taiwanese shark finners shifted their operations to offshore Pakistan and India in the Indian Ocean in 2004. However, the operations in these areas came to an end because of tight surveillance activities by Navies and Coast Guards of these coastal countries. The vessels then moved to the east coast of Africa where controls are insufficient, and these vessels are even poaching in the territorial waters of coastal countries, sometimes within three or four miles from the coastline.

 

This report confirms what PRETOMA and many other national and international organizations, as well as national fishermen, have been saying for years; that Taiwanese shark finning vessels operating in the region are depleting shark stocks.

 

The Japan report also demonstrates that Taiwanese shark finners not only seek out the few areas where sharks still remain, but also where fisheries controls are scarce or non-existent, in order to maintain the profitability of the operation.

 

Costa Rica is a prime example of how shark finners benefit from scarce or non-existent controls. The Costa Rican Customs Department does not enforce Articles 211 and 212 of the Customs Law, which mandate all landings by foreign vessels must occur at public docks. Customs instead allows these vessels to land at private docks where, due to their private nature, Coast Guard officers do not have free access to inspect. Currently 15 to 30 international longline vessels, mainly Taiwanese, continue to land shark fins and other fishery products illegally at private docks each month. By ignoring its own law and allowing the use of private docks, Customs facilitates Taiwanese vessels landing shark fins.

 

“It’s no wonder that many Taiwanese vessels continue to land shark fins in Costa Rica,” states Randall Arauz, President of PRETOMA. “The Costa Rican Customs and National Fisheries Institute (INCOPESCA) have a history of not enforcing controls against shark finning. All Costa Rica needs to do in order to truly halt shark finning is to enforce existing Customs laws and close all loopholes in other regulations. Unfortunately, Customs and INCOPESCA, rather than enforce current laws, prefer to create loopholes wherever possible,” explains Arauz.

 

“For one month, between November and December of 2004, Customs finally applied the law and ordered foreign vessels to land at public docks,” notes Jorge Ballestero, Vice President of PRETOMA. “However, the Taiwanese shark finning interests quickly complained, the Customs Director was immediately replaced, and by January 2005 Taiwanese vessels were landing at private docks once again. Taiwanese shark finning interests dictate Costa Rican fishery policy, and as long as they are allowed to land at private docks in violation of our Customs Law, not even the positive measures against shark finning in the new Fishery Law will be applicable, causing further damage to already depleted shark populations.”

 

In addition to the IOTC report (http://www.tortugamarina.org/images/stories/pdf/iotc.pdf) various other studies show that sharks are disappearing from the region and this is having drastic effects on local fisheries:

 

• A report by PRETOMA shows relative abundance of sharks dropped 60% between 1991 and 2001.

• Global research shows shark populations have declined globally 90% during the last 50 years (http://www.tortugamarina.org/images/stories/pdf/myerswormnature1.pdf).

• Data from 1994 shows that Costa Rican vessels were using 0.86 liters of fuel to catch one kilo of product. By 2003 that number had more than doubled to 1.99 liters of fuel to catch one kilo of product (source: INCOPESCA).

 

 

PRETOMA (Programa Restauración de Tortugas Marinas) is a Costa Rican non-profit, non-governmental, marine conservation organization that works to promote responsible fisheries and protect sea turtles, sharks and marine biodiversity. PRETOMA is a member of the IUCN.

Contact info@tortugamarina.org / www.tortugamarina.org.

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Very interesting but what is the relevance? or am I missing something.

I don't remember questioning whether shark or pike had a right to exist, for my vicarious pleasure or otherwise.

What I questioned was whether you maintain that Pike in Lochs Garry Loyne and Lochs in Wester Ross contain Pike only because they have been illegally stocked by Pike anglers.

If this is the case what proof do you offer to support this claim?

I look forward to an answer to this question

Let's agree to respect each others views, no matter how wrong yours may be.

 

 

Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity

 

 

 

http://www.safetypublishing.co.uk/
http://www.safetypublishing.ie/

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Sportsman

 

I understand that pike were introduced into the Inverness-shire Garry system by disgruntled anglers who objected to paying to fish these waters.

 

I had this explanation for the presence of pike in Loch Garry, Loch Inchlaggan and Loch Poulary and Loch Loyne more than 20 years ago from three different sources: a River Garry gillie,the late Jock McCaskill, the people who ran the guest house at Garry Gullach, and from a previous owner of the Tomdoun Hotel.

 

You might not like what I have said, but I have no reason to believe that it is not true; these things happen, i.e. Loch Lomond infested with ruff.

 

In the meantime, what information can you offer to show that pike are indigenous to the Garry system?

 

Bruce

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Thanks for the answer. The "evidence" is anecdotal at best.

Apropos your question, I didn't say they were, particularly in a major newspaper!

Let's agree to respect each others views, no matter how wrong yours may be.

 

 

Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity

 

 

 

http://www.safetypublishing.co.uk/
http://www.safetypublishing.ie/

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The pike in the garry /loyne area were certainly present more than 20 years ago, I was fishing for them 30 years ago. They were there in the 60s as Dereck Brown who had a garden Centre? of sorts in the area used to fish for them, and write articles about them. There have been pike in the great glen for years and since most of the waters are interconnected in some way, Loch Ness , its more probable that the pike spread through the system in this way.!

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Bruce,

It's interesting that you mention Ruffe.

Surely no "normal" Pike angler would even contemplate the use of Ruffe as a bait.

Is it not possible that the Ruffe were imported in boat bilges etc??

 

Could this also mean Zebra mussel infestation in Ireland on the Shannon system was also caused by Pike anglers using them as bait.

No, hang on a minute, Pike Anglers bring boats to the Shannon, so it's probably their fault anyway you care to look at it.

 

Having said the above I am with you all the way on the Salmon Farm problems.

It's interesting to see that a Canadian scientist is suing a Salmon farming organisation for polluting the sea.

 

Have a look here

 

Colin

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