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NO FISHING - WINTER - SALT


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I'd expect the ground to absorb almost all of it.

 

But water is known to leach the soil by dissolving the mineral ions and running off with them, so how could the ground absorb the salt? also if the ground is still frozen then the salt filled water from the snowmelt would run straight off over it and into the river systems.

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There was an ominous prediction on thes evening's very good Panorama programme that our (well not mine, I don't eat them )rampant consumption of pigs is likely to present a serious threat to fish stocks, as has happened in parts of the US , due to polluting by-products' of intensive mass pig rearing units (farms isn't the right word), planning is in place for one in Derbyshire. A bit of road salt, using barbed hooks, knotted mesh, not using unhooking mats, nor antiseptic swabs, the livebaiting bans may be irrelevent in the face of what we are willing to destroy for the percievedly harmless 'bacon buttie' (there is a life without them, just say 'no').

"Some people hear their inner voices with such clarity that they live by what they hear, such people go crazy, but they become legends"
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There was an ominous prediction on thes evening's very good Panorama programme that our (well not mine, I don't eat them )rampant consumption of pigs is likely to present a serious threat to fish stocks, as has happened in parts of the US , due to polluting by-products' of intensive mass pig rearing units (farms isn't the right word), planning is in place for one in Derbyshire. A bit of road salt, using barbed hooks, knotted mesh, not using unhooking mats, nor antiseptic swabs, the livebaiting bans may be irrelevent in the face of what we are willing to destroy for the percievedly harmless 'bacon buttie' (there is a life without them, just say 'no').

 

...???...

 

Not much chance of this grilled bacon eating Toad giving up bacon...but I did think of an alternative...

 

Easy alternative eat a neighbour...hehehe...I think the cannibals used to call white men long pig and I have read reports which stated the natives said white men were sweet to eat.

 

So go and munch on a neighbour

 

does good on two counts

 

1: feeds you.

 

2: reduces demand for bacon by reducing the number of consumers...hehehe

From a spark a fire will flare up

English by birth, Cockney by the Grace of God

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Although I don't dispute what you say about the incident but the river Hiz is a fair way from Hitchin the nearest river to Hitchin is the River Oghton and in the 1960's I was only living a few miles away and I personally never heard of the incident, I wonder if you might have heard an Urban Myth. incidentally 1963 was the worst winter in the 1960's.

 

Perhaps if it happened it was an exception not a rule and it was certainly not a widespread practice for one thing very few of the rivers were accessable by almost any means let alone lorries dumping snow and salt in vast quantities.

 

You say they dumped, snow and salt I am puzzled why any council would transport snow and salt sounds like too much expense and much too much effort.

 

But I am referring to winter salt and snow melt.

 

The incident you refer to was one of dumping and not just what is put on the road which is what people are complaining about now and I stand by what I said it was not a problem certainly there are bound to be a few incidents but they were not the norm.

 

So why in this day of enlightened conservation greenie outlooks and 'caring councils has it become a problem suddenly?

 

Something is wrong with this picture.

 

Actually the name of Hitchin comes from the name of the river that runs through the town - the river Hiz, the pronunciation of which is actually Hitch. The river also runs through the Prory Park in Hitchin which is where there was a shoal of huge roach. Of course it completely slipped my mind that Richard Walker, Pete Thomas, Bob Rutland and Alan Brown were great perpetrators of urban myths and if that is what you say it is, then I guess you must be right. If you remember 1963 you will remember that there was so much snow in places a lot of it was picked up and dumped elsewhere. But I guess that if it sounds like to much effort and expense to you, I suppose that you must be right there too. I posted my note with the intention of adding interest to your thread, only to have it dismissed as being irrelevant and inaccurate. Perhaps you aren't realy interested in seeing constructive additions to your thread being more interested in just seeing your name in print.

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Politicians are not responsible for a country's rise to greatness; The people are.

 

The people are not responsible for a country's fall to mediocrity; the politicians are.

 

 

 

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I'm not certain as to the science but I do know from experience that fish will feed well in floods caused by rain, but they certainly rarely do so when melted snow gets into the water.

 

Possibly the worst time to have a few days off is when the rivers are full of "snow broth" and the stillwaters remain iced over.

 

Small, shallow stillwaters tend to freeze over first, but on the other hand they tend to thaw out first. It takes a lot of energy to melt the ice, but as soon as it does so the water temperature rises very sharply. Perversely this doesn't always lead to good fishing on shallow waters. Maybe the temperature rise is too fast for the fish to acclimatise?

 

Has anyone else noticed this?

 

 

Yeah, I have found pretty much the same especially with snow melt killing river fishing. I wondered for quite some time if the lower oxygen content in the water in shallow lakes had something to do with the poor fishing after the ice has melted. The darkess caused by the ice - especially when covered in snow - causes everything to go into shut down status and although the fish have slowed down and are breathing less oxygen, the plants cease to produce it too. All theoretical of course, I never had the means to test it but almost certainly, the lack of oxygen in the water appears to be the cause of winter kill.

***********************************************************

 

Politicians are not responsible for a country's rise to greatness; The people are.

 

The people are not responsible for a country's fall to mediocrity; the politicians are.

 

 

 

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I wondered for quite some time if the lower oxygen content in the water in shallow lakes had something to do with the poor fishing after the ice has melted. The darkess caused by the ice - especially when covered in snow - causes everything to go into shut down status and although the fish have slowed down and are breathing less oxygen, the plants cease to produce it too. All theoretical of course, I never had the means to test it but almost certainly, the lack of oxygen in the water appears to be the cause of winter kill.

 

 

Now that seems to make sense. Interesting idea, and it would explain why shallow lakes are hit the worse.

Wingham Specimen Coarse & Carp Syndicates www.winghamfisheries.co.uk Beautiful, peaceful, little fished gravel pit syndicates in Kent with very big fish. 2017 Forum Fish-In Sat May 6 to Mon May 8. Articles http://www.anglersnet.co.uk/steveburke.htm Index of all my articles on Angler's Net

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Yes, I'd go along with that too. I can accept that dumping tons of salt into a watercourse (as in Chevin's example) could have some fairly severe consequences, but I don't think the tiny amounts trickling in from roads would have much (if any) effect. It should be quite easy to measure the salinity of river water following a thaw shouldn't it, to see how much salt actually gets into the river?

And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music

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Yes, I'd go along with that too. I can accept that dumping tons of salt into a watercourse (as in Chevin's example) could have some fairly severe consequences, but I don't think the tiny amounts trickling in from roads would have much (if any) effect. It should be quite easy to measure the salinity of river water following a thaw shouldn't it, to see how much salt actually gets into the river?

 

 

I think it depends on location.

 

The river stour on the suffolk essex border has roads close to its length and a few towns aswell.

 

Haverhill has large industrial area,s concreted and salted aswell as london overspill housing this quickly enters the upper reaches.

 

John

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Yes, I'd go along with that too. I can accept that dumping tons of salt into a watercourse (as in Chevin's example) could have some fairly severe consequences, but I don't think the tiny amounts trickling in from roads would have much (if any) effect. It should be quite easy to measure the salinity of river water following a thaw shouldn't it, to see how much salt actually gets into the river?

 

 

What must be remembered is that while the salt run off in the '60s might not have been a big deal, every new square yard of concrete, asphalt etc is another square yard of instant run off. Run off from those covered areas must be channeled somewhere. If a river isn't too far away, where do you think it will go?

 

I am sure that it would be possible to measure the salinity content of rivers and ponds but does anyone bother. Few council officials have any idea of what kills fish or how to combat it. In the 1970s the council officials at Milton Keynes were proudly telling us of their plans for a sewage water treatment plant and of how pure the water would be. Many of us knew and said that it would be a disater. At the opening we saw officials drinking this wonderfully pure water and a few days later we saw fish dying. It's OK to have pure water, but it needs to have oxygen in it if fish are to survive and they had taken everything out of it.

***********************************************************

 

Politicians are not responsible for a country's rise to greatness; The people are.

 

The people are not responsible for a country's fall to mediocrity; the politicians are.

 

 

 

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