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according to the Anglers Mail there will be a fishing series on BBC2 starting 17th October at 8.00pm and running for four episods it will be fronted by Charles Rangeley (never heard of him) and is called the Accidental Angler. the topics range from fishing the River Wandel in London to Mahseer fishing in India. As we have been moaning for years about Auntie Beebs lack of angling coverage i suppose we are duty bound to watch it. I can't wait.

take a look at my blog

http://chubcatcher.blogspot.co.uk/

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Guest long-trotter

Charles Rangeley-Wilson

 

 

New book by Charles Rangeley-Wilson to accompany a new primetime BBC2 TV series

 

The four-part BBC2 TV series, also entitled The Accidental Angler, will be broadcast weekly as a 60-mins programme on BBC 2 starting on Wednesday 7 Nov. Each episode will focus on one location, starting with London, then India, and onto Brazil and Bhutan.

 

In the book, Charles casts his net much wider, visiting 13 different places, from the Soviet wilderness to the Seychelles - in fact anywhere a fishing rod leads. A fishing rod will break the ice with local - guides, farmers, shopkeepers, taxi drivers and bar-flies. Whether in the world's most outlandish and awe-inspiring places or just at the end of your road, fishing will introduce you to crabby weather and crabby locals, remarkable tales, and fantastic slippery beasts.

 

In The Accidental Angler you'll battle titanic monsters on a tropical atoll and make-believe sharks on the mushy-peas-and-gravy Wash. You'll chase inscrutable grayling through back gardens in Provence, or phantom sea trout in downtown Southampton. And you'll run away from pill-popping Icelandic farmers and find secret rivers hidden beneath the streets in London. Fishing can take you to the heart of the landscape in a way few other forms of travel can match, in a journey that makes the familiar new and the strange familiar.

Edited by long-trotter
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I have the book here :)

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any Good?

 

I'll review it properly soon.

 

I read it straight after the Yates one, so felt a bit sorry for the author. A hard act to follow :)

 

The book is entertaining enough, but makes more sense when you think of it in the context of being able to see it on TV. It wasn't written as one book, so can come across a bit odd if you read it as such.

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Well I think this fantastic news. Never heard of the presenter but here are his favourite fishing books.

 

Charles Rangeley-Wilson's favourite books about fishing

 

Looks as though it's going to more than just filming a bloke on a riverbank too.

 

BBC TWO Tuesday 17 October 2006

The Accidental Angler – London Ep 1/4

Tuesday 17 October

8.00-9.00pm BBC TWO

 

In the first of his journeys across the world to locate unusual fish and the stories behind them, fisherman Charles Rangeley-Wilson is close to home.

 

He goes in search of the wild brown trout in London's Thames – a river which was once populated with salmon and trout. Beginning his journey at Billingsgate Fish Market, Charles quizzes fishmongers for tips.

 

Following leads from a number of people he meets along the way, his quest takes him to an oasis of calm on the River Wandle, amid the bustle of Wandsworth, and he climbs into the sewers in central London to trace the now-hidden River Fleet on its course to the Thames. He finally ends up in a back garden while on the trail of an 18lb trout – the largest ever caught in southern England.

 

On the last day of the fishing season, Charles makes a last-ditch attempt to catch a brown trout on a journey to the River Chess, in Rickmansworth. It seems hopeless but, as the light starts to fade, there is a tug on the line and he finally catches a brown trout.

 

It's an emotional journey for Charles, who sees the existence of the brown trout as a positive sign that the rivers are coming back to life. "This was always a personal journey but I'm surprised at how personal it's become," he admits.

The best time to fish is when you have a chance.

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I'm glad that there is goin to be more fishing on telly but I would hardly call 4 episodes a series, hopefully enough people will watch it to kick the bbc into making more programs :D

 

 

 

Now where's that gift horse gone, its time to check his teeth :sun:

Cheers

<º))))><.·´¯`·.ÐÅѸ.·´¯`·.¸><((((º>

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I'm glad that there is goin to be more fishing on telly but I would hardly call 4 episodes a series, hopefully enough people will watch it to kick the bbc into making more programs :D

Now where's that gift horse gone, its time to check his teeth :sun:

 

The programmes are now going out from Weds 22nd November 8pm. They may move again, but I'll post another note if they do. You won't find the programmes wall to wall angling, but we'd have never got the commission for that. The idea was to produce something the whole family can watch, that will interest people who are not necessarily into fishing – maybe they'll even get into it as a result. That would be great. Whether we've achieved that time will tell. It all happened because I did a book two years ago called "Somewhere Else" which had this mix of travelogue and fishing, and on the back of that got chatting to the BBC about how to make it all work for telly. I'm a writer, not a TV presenter, so I fear the dodgiest part of the whole thing will be me talking to this weird lump of glass and metal. I got more used to it as we went on, but never found it easy. The four programmes have us looking for a wild trout in London – this was all about rivers dying, rivers coming back to life (we tried to make sure we had a strong conservation theme in each show) – trying to catch a mahseer in the Cauvery River in India – looking for peacock bass in the Amazon guided by Caboclos Indians – and lastly to Bhutan, on the trail of the Loch Leven trout that were taken to Kashmir in the 19th century and then on to Bhutan in the fifties. We end up climbing to a lake at 4500 metres to catch trout taken up there by petty criminals as punishment. Poor bastards, the climb was unbelievably knackering – and I was only carrying a stick! If the shows get good ratings then there's a good chance they'll ask for more. That's not bribery by the way! best fishes, The Accidental Angler. (No, I didn't think of that title)

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