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Tigger

A few hours out yesterday.....

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Posted (edited)

You Lost your pint even before you posted Phone - Carbon Fibre weighs next to nothing!!!

It's the shotting pattern below the float that does it!!

Next!! .............

Edited by Martin56

Fishin' - "Best Fun Ya' can 'ave wi' Ya' Clothes On"!!

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Martin,

AHH, of course, it simply skipped my  mind if there is a fiddly way to accomplish a simple task where it can be made difficult because the parts involved are small the Brits will use twice as many parts half the size.

(Ida bought you a pint even if I had won the the bet)

Phone

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Phone, the float is only 3 gram and I shot it simply byusing four or 5bb's.  I have one dropper shot about 6 to 8 inches up from the hook and bulk the rest about 12 or so inches above the dropper.  I can vary the shot as the session goes on by sliding them up and down the line.  I rarely ever faff about with fiddly set ups and for the most of my trotting I simply fish 6lb mono straight through to the hook. The majority of anglers would say I fish way to heavy, some call it crude.  At the end of the day  (crude or not) it works alreet for me :). Obviously there are situations where I do scale right down if the fish i'm targetting pay more attention to anything out of the ordinary/suspicious but i rarely fish for those kind'a species.

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Tigger,

I remembered you fish much as I do (did), straight through to the hook. You want to see the definition of "crude" come to the United States. And while on the topic of crude - I don't even own an unhooking mat.

However, the point of this post is to remind you how successfully I was able to use "disappearing" ice cubes for casting weight distance and accuracy. Commercial ice cubes with a hole down the center are ubiquitous over here and they slip nicely up your mainline. They are gone in a matter of seconds in the summer and minutes in colder water.

Phone  

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I used them in the 70's for fishing in lilly pads they disapear pretty quick and all you have to pull through the leaves if you grt a bite or the crust falls off is the hook .the older method was semi filled bubble floats but more to get snagged.

Easy enough to make just drill a few holes along lolly sticks enough for your ice cube mould put in a blunt cocktail stick so it rests on the bottom of each ice cube mould partition and freeze them ,carrying a flask of them makes the appeal lessen if your climbing fences or walking hundreds of yards.

These more modern torpedo bubble floats have pretty well made them obselete but they do have resistance where a thawed out completely gone ice cube does not.

I presume today if tou used a weedless hook even the chances of that snagging are rare ,may work in snags aswell but i avoided fishing such places at all costs tying a carp to a root isnt my sort of fishing i would rather blank lillies are not as bad.

Saying that they dragged keston ponds when i was a lad looking for a missing woman (mcay?) And some of those roots were 6" think but blimey did they have lots of spinners and plugs caught in them ,me and my mate forbidden to fish by the rozzers had a great time getting those out !


Believe NOTHING anyones says or writes unless you witness it yourself and even then your eyes can deceive you

 

There is only one opinion i listen to ,its mine and its ALWAYS right even when its wrong

 

Its far easier to curse the darkness than light one candle

 

Mathew 4:19

Grangers law : anything i say will  turn out the opposite or not happen at all!

 

"To compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves and abhors, is sinful and tyrannical." Thomas Jefferson

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I had a couple of hours trotting on a dropping but mucky looking river this avvey, I did alreet and caught eleven chub, only average size but they all pulled back hard....

 

IMG-0409.jpg

 

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Edited by Tigger
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Tigger,

Your fish look a treat. No fishing here even if I were fit. 3 degrees F (-16 C) with a cold westerly wind. Your chub must be acclimated to pretty much the same methods and offerings winter and summer.  Good to see you using the new Browning but that reel could use a sponge bath

Phone  

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37 minutes ago, Phone said:

Tigger,

Your fish look a treat. No fishing here even if I were fit. 3 degrees F (-16 C) with a cold westerly wind. Your chub must be acclimated to pretty much the same methods and offerings winter and summer.  Good to see you using the new Browning but that reel could use a sponge bath

Phone  

Yep' Phone, Chub generally feed well all year round.

Here's a little poem I remember as quoted by Jack Hargreaves maybe from the 70's "Country Boy" TV series ......

"When the wind is in the West, the fish bite Best,

When the wind is in the East, the fish bite Least,

When the wind is in the South it blows the bait into their Mouth"

(There is nothing for wind in the North I remember him saying) :uhuh:

Edited by Martin56

Fishin' - "Best Fun Ya' can 'ave wi' Ya' Clothes On"!!

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50 minutes ago, Phone said:

Tigger,

Your fish look a treat. No fishing here even if I were fit. 3 degrees F (-16 C) with a cold westerly wind. Your chub must be acclimated to pretty much the same methods and offerings winter and summer.  Good to see you using the new Browning but that reel could use a sponge bath

Phone  

Phone,

Blimey, it sounds cold in your neck of the woods!  I've tried trotting in sub zero temps and my line kept freezing in the guides so I called it a day after 20 min's!

As Martin says chub feed well all year round, although I think the last fish to stop feeding here in the uk are grayling which feed in our hardest of winters.

The browning is another newbie, it's the waggler version.  Reels clean already :).

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I had several hours trotting way down on the tidal stretch on a large river today.  I had countless dace and a good few chub.  Whilst in the process of netting a chub a quite large pike latched onto it square across it's body.  After a coiple of minuites playing tug of war the pike let go and I landed the chub.  Luckily the chub wasn't to badly damaged.

The chub above in the pic had been grabbed by esox and you can see where either side of it's jaws had been pressing....

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