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Now, I apologise in advance if this question has been done to death on this section of the forum and I have missed the posts but I spend most of my time in the Kayak section.

 

Over there the same questions come up again and again and again and as it is a rapidly growing sport I dont really think that anyone minds sharing their thoughts again and... with new folk to the forum as I suspect they wont on here but stray into other sections and there seems to be a bit more hostility.......

 

....anyway, whilst you are still awake and with no wish to bore you further......I think that I can probably wagg spending somewhere between £400 and £1,200 on new stuff to 'improve my images' (because a good part of my photography is business orientated) before 'THE MANAGEMENT' start to get suspicious and make the usual observations like...'you've got one of those already...you dont need another' ... and I have to start a major education process as to how I dont have what she thinks that I might have etc. etc. etc.

 

Anyway, what I really want some guidance on is this:- I have a Nikon D70 with an 18-70mm Kit Lens and I feel that I am getting to grips with that but starting to feel that my images are not as crisp as those I see in the weekly and monthly photo mags and I 'feel the need' to improve and that I need to make some further investment.

 

Now, I suspect that the most sensible route to do this (other than going on a camera course), is to invest in a better quality lens (rather than a Kit Lens) or lenses, rather than to invest in a better camera body such as the D200 and keep going with the 18-70mm. I have seen some cracking photos taken with the D70 in Amateur Photograher with the Kit Lens but the better quality published shots always seem to be with an F2.8 lenses rather than the cheaper ones.

 

Also, the Cannon EOS 5D beckons and is a leap further into Full Frame but obviously with a change of manufacturer and lens fitting. At this stage I do not have much commitment to Nikon in lenses. But full frame and older cheaper but better quality lenses in the Cannon format may be a sensible way to go too.

 

I suspect that others have been faced with a similar dilemma and hence this posting and clearly I would be grateful of your thoughts on matters.

 

I also have an Olympus 5060WZ which I still think is a great bit of kit.

 

So I guess the question is....get a better quality lense or lenses, get a better quality body, jump ship whilst the investment is relatively low and buy a much more expensive full frame body and pick up less sophisticated but better quality cheaper lenses?

 

You thoughts appreciated......

 

Moonyaker

LOCATION: Nr.Warminster, Wiltshire

KAYAKS:

* OK Prowler 13 (Sunrise)

* OK Scupper Pro TW (Mango Flame)

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It has not been done to death or anything like. Great topic and if I knew enough to offer an opinion I certainly would.

 

I really don't think serious questions are unwelcome on any of the boards. Certainly, some topics have been done over and over and over but that is the nature of this sort of forum. On occasion we have some really extensive answers on older topics and a poster may be directed to one of those.

 

I think that with the exception of the conservation forum where feelings are already running really high, a poster has to work at being nasty to get a hostile response. We do (forums again) have a few long standing feuds but those folks mostly beat on each other.

" My choices in life were either to be a piano player in a whore house or a politician. And to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference!" - Harry Truman, 33rd US President

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Limited experience but I suppose my two peneth my get things going? On the Nikon question, the D80 has set the photographic world chartering, a D200 in all the important bits except name! Labeled as the Nikon committed pros fallback spare? Quality glass will always improve the situation if you are that critical. However, the independents are offering some top lenses, all at the same price in which ever major fit you are committed to. See the review comparisons, very revealing. There appears to be no need these days to pay fancy prices, unless you are into impressing others with a name?

 

So, I would, if I was in your shoes, decide which brand I want to follow, then study the independent glass available?

 

'Sutton W'

Edited by Sutton Warrior
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Hi,

I am by no means a top photographer, but my view is that the Nikon D70 is one hell of a good camera and as you have said you have seen some excellent work taken with the same model.

Lots of published shots do go through a great deal of photo shop work after they have been taken which can improve quality no end.

My advise would be and i am sure you will receive lots of help from the better snappers on here, but mine is-

Improve your technique.

Invest in Photoshop or a similar Suite.

Finally invest in a lens.

The lens is always with you even if you upgrade later you can still use the higher quality lens subject to the fit being compatible.

 

Regards. :thumbs:

Fishing seems to be my favorite form of loafing.

 

"Even a bad day of fishing is better than a good day of work."

 

I know the joy of fishes in the river through my own joy, as I go walking along the same river.

 

What do you think if the float does not dip, try again I think.

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Dont take this the wrong way but the best kit in the world cant 'make' you a good photographer. It takes practice.

 

If I had the cash I would probably spend it on a course to grab the basics of photography. Once you feel you are at your limits with the kit you have then and only then upgrade.

 

If you want to buy a new piece of kit still, go for some glass, but dont expect your pictures to magically improve over night.

 

Joel

 

p.s

 

The above is not aimed at you specifically just from what I have seen.

2PhJuly2013sig_zps25c667b8.jpg


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I tend to agree with the general opinion ...

 

The topmost camera avaliable is useless if you stick cheap glass in front of it.

 

I run Canon cameras .. both the 20D and the 1Ds. I have a variety of lenses ranging from Sigma to Canon mid range. All good at the price.

 

I recently invested a considerable ammount of money in a professional Canon "L" series lens .. and the difference in picture quality is notable.

 

As already stated, a lot of post-shot work goes on in the magazine pictures that are printed.

 

If you have a decent body setup to start with , I would go for better glass every time ....

 

Photography is an art that is not easily learned . I have been at it for over 30 years ... and I am still delightfully average !! :rolleyes::rolleyes:

Edited by MrWiggly

The Older I get .. The better I was.

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Moonyaker, you seem to be worried about 'sharp' pictures??? If yours are not sharp? are your camera menu setting for image quality and sharpness set right. The other area that may be suspect is the kit lens? Nikon 18-70 kit lens is not bad, although I have heard of the od rouge copy, but as a lens, it seems one of the best? Amateur Photographer gave it a very good comparison write up, it trounced the Canon kit offering big time! Heard a few moans and groans on Canon kit lens quality consistency as well.

 

I'd spend the money on glass, and commit to Nikon :rolleyes::clap2: I might be just a tad biased on 'Nikon' :whistling:

 

There is the reworking, and RAW, Photo Shop Elements 4 or 5, either heavily discounted to £30 - £50?

 

'Sutton W'

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About 25 years ago I was advised that "Nikon do not make any bad glass" Modern lense making is all computerised, and even the cheap compacts will take incredibly sharp pics.

 

How many of you actually do a simple resolution test? One of the sharpest lenses I ever used was a Praktika! met the highest test of resolving power on the chart purchased from "Practical Photographer" :)

 

 

Can you still get them?

 

Den

"When through the woods and forest glades I wanderAnd hear the birds sing sweetly in the trees;When I look down from lofty mountain grandeur,And hear the brook, and feel the breeze;and see the waves crash on the shore,Then sings my soul..................

for all you Spodders. https://youtu.be/XYxsY-FbSic

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About 25 years ago I was advised that "Nikon do not make any bad glass" Modern lense making is all computerised, and even the cheap compacts will take incredibly sharp pics.

 

How many of you actually do a simple resolution test? One of the sharpest lenses I ever used was a Praktika! met the highest test of resolving power on the chart purchased from "Practical Photographer" :)

Can you still get them?

 

Den

 

Below the reviews on the Nikon D70 and 80, there are some major resolution tests, although I think he uses some good glass to show the camera at its best, = 'what can be achieved'!

 

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond80/

 

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond70/

 

Shoot in RAW and there ant no differance, between Canon 400 and Nikon D80!

 

:unsure::headhurt:

Edited by Sutton Warrior
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You didnt say what your main subject of photography is, or did I miss it? .... I'd say that would be a major factor? In my opinion I'd say technique is the key to good images by miles and miles, then glass, then the camera ... My two pence worth would be, if your looking at doing landscapes you want glass that gives good corner to corner shaprness with nice colour rendition, some of the kit lenses do this ... if you get a good copy (Canon and Sigma QC seems not to great ... I dont know about Nikon), if your doing portraits etc - your looking at glass with a wee bit of speed under various lighing conditions for good bokeh... this is where your F1.8 and F2.8 etc come in ....... and if required your looking at your use of flash guns etc I absolutely hate post processing photos in Photoshop, apart from cropping, curves and sharpening ... so I try my best to get the most from a shot when I take it.

 

For my landscapes I use a Canon 17-40mm L and a much cheaper Sigma 20mm F1.8 ..... I prefer the Sigma as its a great copy, my personal choice. I've seen absolutely amazing shots from kit lesnes, and shots that are terrible taken with top of the line 1Ds Mk2 Full Frame and a 17-40mm lens ..... all down to poor technique, I think if you improve technique you'd see a nice improvement. Incidentally - my best selling landscape shot by a long shot is one taken with a simple wee 2mp Point & Shoot camera on a very very wet day :-)

 

If I were you - if Full Frame is important to you, sell the D70, get a 5D and a 17-40 L and 50mm F.18 ...... if not, just get hold of some more nice Nikon glass that suits your needs and a flash gun if you need it.

 

Gillies

tha fis agam a bhe iasg nuth dunidh sasain!

 

www.gilliesmackenzie.com

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