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Reservoir zander


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#1 The Flying Tench

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Posted 17 September 2018 - 04:54 PM

Steve Walker put me onto the idea of a trip to Rutland Water for zander (vertical jigging), and I've decided to go even though my bad back may have a few problems with the backless seats. But I've one or two questions for Steve or anyone else:

 

Time of year. I'm thinking of going soon, late Sept or early Oct. Is that OK for zander?

 

Rods etc. I saw a YouTube video where the guy used jig heads of over 20gms. That's way over what I've used when I've done a bit of ultra-lite fishing. But I guess you still need a sensitive tip for bite detection? So I'm thinking of taking an ultra-lite Rockfish rod (up to 12 gm) and a 7 foot spinning rod (up to 20 gm.) Does that sound OK? 

 

My line would be braid, 8lb and 14 lb. If the 8lb is too light I'd have to go to 28lb. Or do I need to buy something else?

 

Finding the fish. I think I roughly know what to do once a shoal is found, but finding the fish is an issue. On one video they seemed to drift, while casting in all directions (one rod). On another one they seemed to have 4 rods out, just trailing the bait, I assume bumping along the bottom. Has anyone tried this?

 

Lures - about 4"?

 

Finally, there's also Grafham Water. Any difference from Rutland? I'd be mainly wanting zander rather than pike.

 

Thanks

 

John


john clarke

#2 Phone

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Posted 17 September 2018 - 05:36 PM

Tench,

 

In our waters fall is really best for big fish.  I could go on and on with "how-to's" but rather I would suggest google the word "walleye".  That is the name of zander in North America.

 

As for myself, I've always had the best luck using a jig and piece of nightcrawler.  I confess, I go one place most of the time.  Ohh, I drift jig or drift about a 12 inch bottom bouncer.

 

Phone

These fish are not picky about being line shy or terminal kit being a bit out of order.  They are true predators.



#3 Martin56

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Posted 17 September 2018 - 06:49 PM

Reckon I'd go for something like a 7 foot Tele' Pike rod to match the 28 Lb line??

 

Pretty cheap rods online these.

 

Here's a few for under £20 (& some for quite a bit more)

 

https://www.googlead...Q9aACCE8&adurl=

 

I use these cheap rod types on hol's & well made for the money - Like the NGT 9 foot 4 piece.


Edited by Martin56, 17 September 2018 - 07:12 PM.

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#4 Steve Walker

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 08:55 AM

John, there's a lot to be said for having an echo sounder and someone who knows how to use it in the boat. Anderoo or Kappa are very good at it.

 

You find suitable fish holding areas - slopes, drop-offs, features, etc - or sometimes just areas which are at the same depth you've been catching fish at - and then you drift over them. You use a drogue to slow your drift. It can be quite hard if there isn't enough wind to drift, but that's unusual. A lot of the anglers use H-markers - these: https://www.anglingd...-h-block-marker - you drop them, the line unwinds until it hits the bottom while the float stays at the top. You drop one where you have found fish and then aim to cover the same area on your next drift.

 

You need heavy jigheads - you are fishing on the bottom in very deep water. A range from 20g to 50g would be sensible. And large, soft plastic lures. 5-6 inch ones, with stingers. Check the rules, there is a minimum lure size and last time I was there is was singles only for stingers, no trebles.

 

You don't need massively heavy tackle. 10lb braid is about right, 8lb or 14lb would be fine. The heavier (thicker) the braid, the more lead you need to keep in touch with the bottom.

 

You don't particularly need a very sensitive tip. I have a six foot Savage Gear vertical jigging rod. It's actually quite stiff, because it's designed more for giving action to the lure than for bite detection. Bites are felt through the rod or seen when the line goes slack on the drop. Nor do you need something as heavy as a pike rod. The rods you describe should be OK. Not perfect, but OK. If you want an actual jigging rod, you can pick them up for £30-£50, though they are a bit of a specialised rod to buy and you might not get much use out of it.

 

Once fishing, you drop the lure right to the bottom. Then you quickly lift it a foot or two, then lower it, following the lure down and controlling the descent. Often bites occur on the descent, and are indicated by a slack line before you hit the bottom. Otherwise you are feeling for taps. The bites can be quite subtle.

 

If there isn't enough wind to drift, you may need to cast and retrieve, jigging it over the bottom. That can be effective but it's a lot easier and more effective to jig vertically if you can.

 

This was a few years back in the boat with Kappa (and a terrible head cold).

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=iurEaro7Dwo

 

There's a classic slack line bite at 6:10 - watch as the lure stops before it hits the bottom.

 

Should point out that we struggled for drift that day. We sometimes had to get it moving with the engine, but you're not allowed to troll under power. Just a matter of not taking the Mickey.



#5 Steve Walker

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 09:02 AM

Oh, and as for time of year, this is when Anderoo and Kappa usually mount their campaign.

 

And Grafham - I've not fished it, but I understand that the zander are a lot bigger but a lot fewer. Fair chance of a couple of decent fish. Fair chance of a blank too.



#6 Rusty

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 01:00 PM

Hi John, hope you’re well.

 

All you need to know about fishing Rutland is here;

 

http://www.anglersne...ber/?hl=rutland

 

And here;

 

http://www.anglersne...-in/?hl=rutland

 

I can try and summarise important bits.

 

20g jig heads at a minimum (only if there’s zero drift), 30g & 40g preferable even a 50g for windy days. Jig heads should have stingers attached, of the few zander I caught most were hooked by the stinger. 10lb braid minimum but as thin as you can get it, you’ll be fishing at up to 100’ and at that depth thick braid will drag a lot and you won’t feel bites. Take a cushion for the boat seats. Flouro for the leader and no link swivels between fluoro and lure, spoils the lure action apparently. Drogue essential, fish finder very preferable but not worth the expense for one day out.

 

I bought a Rutland setup for when I attended the two fish-ins a few years back so I have most of what you need including the drogue (no fish finder though), you’re welcome to borrow it if you decide to go.  


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#7 Steve Walker

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 01:13 PM

Flouro for the leader and no link swivels between fluoro and lure, spoils the lure action apparently.

Also clatters into the tip ring if you aren't careful!

#8 Phone

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 04:52 PM

All,

 

Isn't there a topographical map of this venue? Walleye are not "opportunistic" feeders.  They have a plan that involves hiding and executing an attack.

 

FWIW, I jig much slower and a shorter distance than in Steve's video (nice Steve).   Without a method of identifying the "dead" areas I would try to fish along the edge of the vegetation line.  I don't know the color of the venue water so I'm no help where that might be.

 

Phone 



#9 Steve Walker

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 09:14 PM

Phone - I know what you mean - that action seems to work, but its more than I would normally use. Sometimes apparently deadsticking works, so its a matter of experimentation.

Its a large drinking water supply reservoir so the water is pretty clear. In the boatyard I would say you can see the bottom in 10-15 feet. But youre generally fishing 40-90 feet down and its pretty dark down there.

I once dropped my Waterwolf over the side to see how dark it was. There was a bit of an algal bloom that day, but even so...

https://youtu.be/jhiyHRI6elA

I suspect that the zander migrate to the shallows at night to feed, but in the day theyre usually pretty deep.

You could get a topographical map, but its quite a big, featureless expanse of water so Im not sure how easy it would be to get much from it.

#10 chesters1

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 09:22 PM

I was wondering if lidar could penetrate water ,obviously not

https://houseprices....?ref=SK90150853

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