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Peter Waller

German Girl Two

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I thought that they were all chapels too Ian, until this came up, it's actually church of england having finally found the old deeds. De consecrated in 1974 due to having a regular attendance of about 6 people.

 

Chris, oh yee of little faith, the first is down the roman road, past the church and castle, facing west just after the fork which goes up to the part where they store the farm equipment, the second was just below that.

 

I've attached a picture of the castle and one of the church and a deer in the park and you'll see from the Exif info on the photo (OR ONE OF THE GUYS WITH EXIF WILL BE ABLE TO CONFIRM) , that they were taken a few minutes later :P

 

this is really just an excuse to say to anyone reading this, go to the photography forum, it really motivates you to try something different with your photos, and to stop the car and have a walk to see what you may come across.

 

the church

ripleychurch.jpg

 

the castle

ripleycastle.jpg

 

the deer (and pheasant)

42790022.jpg

 

Patty thanks for the comments on the photos. Please do have a look at the photography forum, there are some fantastic images on there by much better photographers than I, but thanks all the same.


phil,

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Hi fellas,

 

I'm so sorry for the late reply, but I had to work this morning in an institut for retarted people. Itb was a lovely, but very stressful soring day. :wiggle: I've worked ther, before I became a writer and I still work there sometimes, when an excolleague gets sick. And this afternoon I drove to the bookshops of the city Trier, to make them have my book, with my charms. :rolleyes:

 

To Phil, how are you?

 

To bad, that you don't have an altar or a crypta in your house, that would have been the icing of the cake, but that window - wow - Is that really in your house? If it is, then I would like to live there. Those pictures of the woods, the castle and the deer are beautyful. Did you ever thought about publishing them in a calendar or in a picturebook - there so lovely. :thumbs: I've just got to find the time to take a look at the photography forum.

 

We have a roman road here to iut's called the "Sirona Weg" and the tower of our church was a roman tower. Unfortunately all of our castles in my area where destroyed by the french. :nono: I like them, but I'll never forgive them, for destroying our castes.

 

2rgne51.jpg

This is our church in ma home village of Hottenbach, isn't it beautyful?

 

Is the place called Ripley close to your home? Do you have any pictures of it? It sounds wild, like my kind of place. :clap2:

 

To Ian,

 

hi nice to hear from you again ans thanks for explaining how converted churches are used in britain. We don't have here converted churche, at least I don't know one and never seen one. I envy those people who can live so beautyfully in such a stylish, historic surrounding, and I didn't know that you still had catholic churches in england. I thought they are all gone, because your church split so long ago from the catholic church. Wasn't it Henry VIII who created his own church, that didn't have the pope as highest person? I like our pope and not just because he's german, I liked John Paul the second too, very much, and that as beeing a vampire. :g:

 

Thanks also for given me some information about cornwall. I'm amazed, that they have there one language. What language do they speak? I really hope, I'll get some information and maybe pictures and historical facts of cornwall, it sounds very interersting.

 

Keep on telling me more about your beautyful, historic homeland, I really enjoy that. Soon I'll probably now more about the UK then you fellas do. :punk:

 

And sorry again, for the late reply.

 

Patty


4ham55k.jpg

 

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Patrizia,

 

A free history lesson: Henry VIII created the Church of England and made himself head of it. He basically picked up the idea from Martin Luther (in Germany) who was protesting (i.e. a protestant) about the excesses of the Catholic Church. Henry did all this so he could get a divorce (he hadn’t got round to chopping his wives heads off just yet), he wanted a divorce because his wife was not producing any sons and sons is what he wanted more than anything so they could carry the Tudor gene on to the next generation. This is the theory of the ‘Selfish Gene.’

 

But…..the Catholic Church survived and about 10% of the population of England is Catholic, a much higher figure in Scotland, about 50% in N. Ireland and not many in Wales.

 

Catholic churches are found in most towns and cities but rarely in villages, apart from the English Catholics there are also many Irish, Polish and other immigrants who are of course, catholic.

 

All English villages have a Church of England (protestant) church and many of them are very old and very beautiful. Of course, before Henry VIII these churches were Catholic churches. There are also many chapels (Methodist, Baptist etc.) but a lot of these are being converted to private dwellings as you have seen.

 

Scotland has the Church of Scotland (Anglican) and the Catholic Church, I’m not sure what they have in N. Ireland and Wales has mostly chapels (I think).

 

In Cornwall they have a language called Cornish, which is a Celtic language very similar to Welsh and Breton. Cornwall is the only county in England where the people are Celts and not Anglo-Saxon (i.e. German). The people of Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Cornwall and Brittany are all Celts and they were the people who lived in Britain before the Anglo-Saxons arrived. The area where the Anglo-Saxons settled became Angle-land or England.

 

Later came the Danes but that is a whole different story.

 

Ian

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Hi Ian,

 

thanks for the free history-lesson. I enjoyed reading it very much. I had no idea, that our Marti Luther was one of the reasons, that Henry VIII created the Church of England and made himself head of it. Our good Martin Luther, we owe him quite a bit. For example, he translated the bible from latin into german, so common people could read it too. I think Henry the eights was very cruel, to devorce or even kill his wife just because she didn't give burth to a son. To think, that later on Queen Elisabeth the first and the second were such great Queens. :thumbs:

 

About north ireland. Why are the catholics and the protestants hate eachother so much? There both christians. I always carry a rosary and I'm a protestant, and I like the pope.

 

About the language cornish. I would really like to hear that. Do you understand that language? Where do they speak Breton and what kind of language is that?

 

You said: Cornwall is the only county in England where the people are Celts and not Anglo-Saxon (i.e. German). So we germans and you Anglo-Saxons are the same and Celtics are diffrent. I always thought that we - germans and brits - were all Celtics - iland-celtics and continent-celtic, to diffrent tribes, that decended from the same old celtic-tribe. Are Celts many diffrent from us?

 

You've tought me some new facts about history. Thanks, please keep on going. :clap2: Tell me more about the celts and the languages of britain.


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About north ireland. Why are the catholics and the protestants hate eachother so much? There both christians. I always carry a rosary and I'm a protestant, and I like the pope.

 

The short answer is that the protestants in Ireland were originally "planted" there by the British (a lot of them were Scots). After Henry VIII (him again!) split from the Catholic church, the Catholic nations of France and Spain were both keen to invade us, and for us to have a Catholic neighbour like Ireland "on the back doorstep" was a danger. So we tried to ensure that the ruling class in Ireland was actually British (and protestant). Over the centuries, Ireland made several attempts to ally with other Catholic countries in the hope of overturning British rule in their country.

 

After Ireland was officially partitioned in 1921, Northern Ireland (where most of the protestants are) became part of Great Britain, which nationalists in the Republic of Ireland were not very happy about (understandably).

 

That's an over-simplification, but as brief an answer as can be managed in a few words!

 

BTW, Cornish as a language has only fairly recently been revived, and not that many people actually speak it. The Celts and Gaels in the British Isles (Cornish, Welsh, Scots, Irish and Manx) are the "original inhabitants" who were driven to the fringes (if they weren't actually there already) by the invading Romans, Saxons, Vikings and Normans. One of the main features distinguishing Celts from Anglo Saxons is language - Cornish speakers can understand Breton (from Brittany in Northern France) and vice versa. Scots and Irish Gaelic also are very similar.

Edited by DavyR

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Hi guys.

 

Ripley's another place in North Yorkshire, perhaps an hours drive from Witby (where draculas Abbey is) and a little closer to the Yorkshire dales. The nearest town is Harrogate, a gorgeous Victorian era, spa town with lovely gardens, great shops (my wife needs this to be pointed out) and some great bars and restaurants (more important for me). The photos were taken when driving down from Newcastle to visit my mother just before christmas.

 

A lot of the catholic churches around my way are modern buildings (less than 100 years old), usually paid for by the poorest people collecting every penny they had, this is in contracst to many of the methodist/baptist chapels which were often paid for by mill owners trying to show off to others (not always however).

 

re Northern Ireland, there are a lot of reasons that both sides can readily look at to come up with their justifications. The good news is that they are starting to do something about it and the place is more positive than it has been for a long time.

Edited by phil dean

phil,

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Hi fellas,

 

I have to apologize again for the late reply. Today was just as stressful as yesterday. I've just got home from driving with my cat to the doctor. He's slowly getting better, thank god. I'm so afraid, that he wont make it. This morning and in the afternoon I had to drive to the city "Trier" again, to visite the other bookshopes, that I didn't do yesterday - to tell them about my book. It went well. :thumbs:

 

Hi Davy,

 

thanks very much for explaining me the conflict of northern ireland. I had no idea, that many scots were living there. I always thought scots were catholics, now you tell me there protestants - interesting! And of course Henry VIII had something to do with it. He was a really pleasant man, wasn't he. He was very cruel to his wifes, prefered sons over daughters and now he had something to do with the conflict in northern ireland. He was a crazy king. :thumbdown: But we in germany had those kind of kings too. There was "König Ludwig of Bayern". He was a fairytale king, they said. He build "Neu Schwanstein", which is probably the most beautyful castle in the world, after Versailes. But he was really crazy, spend a fortune for building castles, while his people were suffering hunger. Why don't the british let the northern irish people be with there countrymen, be part of ireland, instead of great britain, now, that europe is united? Do they still want to be free?

 

Neu Schwanstein

2rca9hw.jpg

 

Another few of Neu Schwanstein

2a0nrrp.jpg

 

Beautyful, isn't it?

 

He build much more castles like that. At the end he killed himself in a sea, but they say, it could also have been murder. I guess it was, beeing so nice and normal.

 

Thanks for explaining the cornish language for me and for telling me more about the diffrent tribes, that grew to be the british people. Tell me more about it, please. That is very interesting, that you have so many diffrent languages in your country. We have that here in germany too, but we all speak german, it's on elnaguage, just very diffrent dialects, which can be hard to understand too, and sometimes it's impossible. Did anybody ever went fishing in Cornwall? Tell me about it, please. And is there a digionary english-cornish - englich-welsh and so on. That would interest me. Tell me more about the history of your country.

 

Hi Phil,

 

thanks for telling me more about Yorkshire. Harrogate seems like a nice town. Why is it, that men don't like to go shopping? You said: ...great shops (my wife needs this to be pointed out) and some great bars and restaurants (more important for me). Just like my husband. And I thought it would just be like that with german men. :wallbash:

 

About the churches: How are the modern churches build in england? Here they are so ugly. :yucky: I like the old ways of building houses and churches! :thumbs:

I must agree with you. Northern Ireland seems to be a much nicer place now, then it was in the past. I wonder if catholics and protestants are getting married there? Would be nice, since there both christians and europians. :thumbs:

 

Thanks again, fellas. It's very nice of you, to tell a german girl about your beautyful country!!! :clap2:


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Why don't the british let the northern irish people be with there countrymen, be part of ireland, instead of great britain, now, that europe is united? Do they still want to be free?

 

I think most people in the rest of Britain don't mind which country Ulster (N. Ireland) is part of, but the Northern irish do!


john clarke

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And of course Henry VIII had something to do with it. He was a really pleasant man, wasn't he. He was very cruel to his wifes, prefered sons over daughters and now he had something to do with the conflict in northern ireland. He was a crazy king.

 

Well in some ways he was a 'nasty piece of work' but, strangely, he is thought to have been a good king. My undestanding is that his big concern was to avoid civil war over the religious issues of the reformation by finding a 'middle way' which he succeeded in doing.


john clarke

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I always carry a rosary and I'm a protestant, and I like the pope.

And you are also a vampire, which does make you quite broad-minded!

 

By the way, I am a vicar (Church of England Minister). On the protestant/catholic question the C of E has always tried to be a bit of everything: 'catholic and reformed'. Catholic in the sense of carrying on the old traditions, protestant in theology ( according to the '39 articles') though some 'anglicans' are in practice more catholic and others (like me) more protestant. This whole approach started with Henry VIII.

 

The first well-known book on fishing in England was written by Isaac Walton, who was an ardent Anglican of the high church variety. He was converted to christian faith by the famous poet John Donne. Isaac had some strong and unlikely views. He claimed that 'the best of our Lord's disciples were anglers', which I suppose is at least arguable, but he also claimed that Moses was an angler which I fear is unlikely!

 

Going back to the catholic/protestant question I often wonder if we were in USA if the catholics wouldn't be able to sue the Cof E and get all their churches back! Also, it's amazing to think that even in Eire (southern Ireland) all the old catholic churches were taken over by the C of E, which was the established church till early in the 20th century, even though the vast majority of the population had turned catholic and built new churches. (I'm no expert on irish history, so someone tell me if I'm wrong). I think the catholics are really very understanding towards anglicans like me!


john clarke

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