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Emma two

Are keepnets really so bad, if so why?

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Firstly please forgive me if the use of keepnets has been discussed previously, I did a quick search, but found nothing other than mentions of them. This is a continuation of the 'Robson Green' thread, but possibily deserves it's own space. In that thread John Wilson is reported to have used a keepnet with which to store tench. Presumably that fact alone is sufficiant to contitute a 'bad thing'. There is no mention of the impact upon the fish, did they suffer from such imprisonment and if so in what way? Has it become simply assumed that keepnets are 'bad'? and if so then why are they still in use at all and have not gone the same way as the gaff, and the pike gag. is there good sound scientific research to show the ill effect of their use upon fish? and please, if there is cite the study.

 

I know and have seen the impact of nets and cages on fish kept in them for long periods and so will most of us who have fished commerical trout fisheries and have landed trout with stumps where their tails should be, and undertand the outlawing of knotted mech landing lets which have the potential to dislodge scales, but is a spacious, soft meshed and properly staked out keepnet really such a bad thing?

 

I have used them during the match fishing chapter of my angling life and still do on occasion, for example when static perch fishing in the lakes, that way after a session I can sort out a few medium sized fish for the table. When feeder fishing for roach I use one, simply to see the total bag and photograph it for my own records. When visiting the midlands I use one on the canal when tiddler catching for pike bait, at the end of a session one can sort out baits and return the rest.

 

Three years ago i took a non angling friend perch fishing, the spot was likley to produce stripeys in numbers if not great individual size, almost as an afterthought I took a deadbait set up with us. 10 minutes after putting it out I found myself playing a large pike. I landed the fish, looked and thought, 'thats a 20', but had no way of knowing for sure, no scales and no camera! I placed in in the keepnet which was staked out in a deep oxygenated channel of a feeder stream. The depth varied by only a few feet from that which it had been caught in, the notion of 'gassing up' did occur to me. I left it there in the care of my by now quite excited companion and drove the 15 minute journey to town, rushed into the tackle shop for scales and to Boots for a disposable camera. It weighed just over 22lbs and as I had suspected was my personal best. It was weighed in an improvised sling fashioned from a soaked lightweight waterproof jacket before being returned. It swam strongly away. I don't believe that I harmed that fish, but perhaps someone will tell me that I did? and that I am a wicked angler. Now I alwys take a digital camera with me and scales capable accurately measuring fish larger then I am ever likely to catch.

Edited by Emma two

"Some people hear their inner voices with such clarity that they live by what they hear, such people go crazy, but they become legends"

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To be honest I don't know that keepnets are a bad thing, but logic suggests that keeping fish confined in close quarters for extended periods of time is unlikely to be good for them.

However, can I pick up on another part of your post, the lengths you went to to weigh and record your pike. My only question is why. What is this obsession with knowing the exact weight of a fish, and why the need for photographs?

Regarding the weight, why was it necessary to know its weight. You knew it was a PB and you had the memory of catching it. Surely that is enough. I don't know the weight of any of my biggest fish, but I could tell you where I caught it and on what bait/lure/fly I was using. I may well have a photograph of the place, taken on the day, but not of the fish. I don't need one to remind me, and I definitely don't need one to impress other people.

Sorry, this isn't a dig at you personally, it is something that I have mentioned many times on here.. I just don't get it


Let's agree to respect each others views, no matter how wrong yours may be.

 

 

Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity

 

 

 

http://www.safetypublishing.co.uk/
http://www.safetypublishing.ie/

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The research I remember looked at cortisol levels in fish, and found that any stress caused by the use of a keepnet was completely swamped by the stress caused by catching them in the first place.

 

Personally, I've no problem with keepnets used responsibly. If you don't want to stress fish, don't catch them.

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Personally, I've no problem with keepnets used responsibly. If you don't want to stress fish, don't catch them.

 

Same here Steve, spot on.

 

 

John.


Angling is more than just catching fish, if it wasn't it would just be called 'catching'......... John

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I just don't get it.
Me neither. I never owned a keepnet. In the extremely unlikely event that the fish is going to be 'kept' it will be dead otherwise I release them immediately.

The problem isn't what people don't know, it's what they know that just ain't so.
Vaut mieux ne rien dire et passer pour un con que de parler et prouver que t'en est un!
Mi, ch’fais toudis à m’mote

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Guest tigger

There's nothing wrong with keepnets if there used correctly, not overly packed with fish etc and if you can be botherd carrying one.

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I haven't owned or used a keepnet for years and in general I'd rather they weren't used, particularly for retaining loads of small-medium sized fish like perch, roach, bream, rudd, etc. (It goes without saying that big fish shouldn't be kept in a keepnet, doesn't it?) However, if someone is fishing for big perch, roach, chub, etc. and wants to hold a decent fish or two for an hour or two, and the net is properly staked out in deep enough, oxygenated water, that's fine with me. I prefer to release big fish along the bank a bit, personally.

 

As a kid I did enjoy seeing what I'd caught at the end of the day, I must admit. However, in those long-gone days ( :rolleyes: ) we didn't catch 100lb of carp, we caught a dozen or so small fish of various species. Even so, I'm ashamed to say that it wasn't unusual to have at least one dead or dying fish when we came to release them.

 

EDIT: Sportsman, I'm afraid I'm the same as Emma. In that situation I wouldn't have held the fish and gone to get scales/camera but it would have really bugged me to not know what it weighed! A photo I can do without (I don't have photos of several of my most memorable fish, but I do always carry a small camera these days) but I do want to know what a fish weighs. I don't know why though!

Edited by Anderoo

And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music

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Hmm, yes, you sometimes see dead and dying fish after matches. The question is, though, are they that way because they were kept in a net, or would they have snuffed it out of sight and out of mind had they been released immediately?

Edited by Steve Walker

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Hmm, yes, you often see dead and dying fish after matches. The question is, though, are they that way because they were kept in a net, or would they have snuffed it out of sight and out of mind had they been released immediately?

 

Apart from the odd tiny perch, I'm absolutely convinced it's because of the net. I've seen it enough times to be convinced. Why, I'm not sure - it probably depends on some specific circumstances like how and where the net is pegged, the weather, and the species of fish, together with injuries from crushing (if there are a lot of fish) and stress from overcrowding.

 

I suspect that the reason people claim that fish don't die in keepnets is because these days a lot of fish in nets are small carp, which are as tough as old boots.

Edited by Anderoo

And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music

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In the old days I used a keep net (I still have one but never take it with these days)

The lasting memory of releasing fish from the keep net is the dead floating fish and the amount of scales that float off when you empty it and wash it out.

 

They have to be bad news.

 

They also have the potential to be lethal in the wrong hands, I have seen kids tipping the contents of there keep net on to the bank (regardless of gravel, grass or tarmac, and counting the fish then giving them the big heave hoe back into the water.

 

I say they should not be encouraged for use with new anglers and kids

I have just as much fun catching and releasing, I remember when I took the conscious effort to drop the keep net. It was hard, old habits die hard but now I have done it, I have no regrets. I guess I gave it up about 15 years ago.

 

Emma

You are a game fisher, you would not keep all your days trout in a keep net to select the best fish for the pan would you, why treat perch differently?

You know the score, you take a chance and knock one on the head.


Jasper Carrot On birmingham city

" You lose some you draw some"

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