Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Ken L

Low river levels

Recommended Posts

The Severn is currently showing 15cm on the Bewdley gage.

That's 2cm lower than I've ever seen it and it's forecast to drop to 12cm tomorrow.

How are other rivers holding up?


Species caught in 2020: Barbel. European Eel. Bleak. Perch. Pike.

Species caught in 2019: Pike. Bream. Tench. Chub. Common Carp. European Eel. Barbel. Bleak. Dace.

Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullien's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.

Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

KEN,

WoW Does it have plenty of deep holes.  Fish survival rate in 2cm of water  is near zero on a warm day. I'm missing something since I know it is an established river and fishery

Phone

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Stable here ,it takes a lot to effect the river and although it does flood theres plenty of water meadows to do their job and it really never gets very low as it has two sources that join in the village

https://flood-warning-information.service.gov.uk/station/7231?direction=u

You can see how i dont fish for long its shallow with holes so one walk and you catch or put the fish down spooked

Its usually just deep enough for a canoe (now banned) but when the abbey was built it was 5-6 ft deep

Edited by chesters1

Believe NOTHING anyones says or writes unless you witness it yourself and even then your eyes can deceive you

 

There is only one opinion i listen to ,its mine and its ALWAYS right even when its wrong

 

Its far easier to curse the darkness than light one candle

 

Mathew 4:19

Grangers law : anything i say will  turn out the opposite or not happen at all!

 

"To compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves and abhors, is sinful and tyrannical." Thomas Jefferson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

The gages are set from a bedrock datum point and record the level of water above that datum.

Summer level at the Bewdley gage typically drops as low as 19 cm in the summer and I have exceptionally seen it as low as 17cm in the past but then there's probably a meter of water out in the middle of the river.

By other local gage is on the Stour at Puxton and summer level there  is typically about 40cm and I doubt the river gets any deeper than that away from the gage.

 

Edit: They actually have an explainer - which is clear as mud.

Turns out it's not a point on the bedrock but a datum derived from the national mapping agencies database:

Quote

 

How are river levels measured?

The Environment agency uses a network of monitoring stations across the country. Each one has its own datum - a height in metres fixed relative to mean sea level. This height is expressed as metres above ordnance datum (mAOD). The river levels we provide for each monitoring station are all relative to its site datum.

If we didn't do this, we'd show some very high measurements, which could cause confusion. By using a local site datum, the river levels are easier to understand, especially by users familiar with the data from a particular monitoring station.

A river's height above ordnance datum can be seen by adding the site datum to the river level.

 

 

Edited by Ken L

Species caught in 2020: Barbel. European Eel. Bleak. Perch. Pike.

Species caught in 2019: Pike. Bream. Tench. Chub. Common Carp. European Eel. Barbel. Bleak. Dace.

Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullien's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.

Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't worry about it Ken, plenty rain forecast anyhow.

Low levels at this time of year are only to be expected and should help the fry stay alive.

Rivers round here are up and down, problem with that is many millions of fry are left in pools as the river drops off and die, river rises again, same thing happens!

Better to be low for a decent spell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Tigger said:

I wouldn't worry about it Ken, plenty rain forecast anyhow.

Low levels at this time of year are only to be expected and should help the fry stay alive.

Rivers round here are up and down, problem with that is many millions of fry are left in pools as the river drops off and die, river rises again, same thing happens!

Better to be low for a decent spell.

Yep,  with no major summer floods so far and loads of bait going in due to furlough, I reckon this could be a very good year for fry recruitment.


Species caught in 2020: Barbel. European Eel. Bleak. Perch. Pike.

Species caught in 2019: Pike. Bream. Tench. Chub. Common Carp. European Eel. Barbel. Bleak. Dace.

Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullien's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.

Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chalkstreams (least my local ones) have good flow and levels after a wet late winter....

 

 


"Study to be quiet." ><((º> My Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm guessing that's because your rivers are sort of slow released as they filter through the chalk Chris?

I've yet to fish a genuine chalk streem, i'll manage it one day lol. 

I love their appearance and clarity of water, fantastic waters!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy f....

It's down to 10 cm!

https://flood-warning-information.service.gov.uk/station/2001

If I wasn't such a raspberry at the moment, I'd pop over just to take a look.


Species caught in 2020: Barbel. European Eel. Bleak. Perch. Pike.

Species caught in 2019: Pike. Bream. Tench. Chub. Common Carp. European Eel. Barbel. Bleak. Dace.

Species caught in 2018: Perch. Bream. Rainbow Trout. Brown Trout. Chub. Roach. Carp. European Eel.

Species caught in 2017: Siamese carp. Striped catfish. Rohu. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Black Minnow Shark. Perch. Chub. Brown Trout. Pike. Bream. Roach. Rudd. Bleak. Common Carp.

Species caught in 2016: Siamese carp. Jullien's golden carp. Striped catfish. Mekong catfish. Amazon red tail catfish. Arapaima. Alligator gar. Rohu. Black Minnow Shark. Roach, Bream, Perch, Ballan Wrasse. Rudd. Common Carp. Pike. Zander. Chub. Bleak.

Species caught in 2015: Brown Trout. Roach. Bream. Terrapin. Eel. Barbel. Pike. Chub.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Tigger said:

I'm guessing that's because your rivers are sort of slow released as they filter through the chalk Chris?

 

Yes - the aquifers were VERY full at the end of Feb - and this station on a Winterbourne close to the Kennet's source is usually dry during the summer - the fact it's still registering ANY flow at all is unusual....https://flood-warning-information.service.gov.uk/station/7112?direction=u


"Study to be quiet." ><((º> My Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...