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A large part of big fish fishing (for any species, not just carp) is not just trying to catch the fish you do want, but trying to avoid the fish you don't want. If you're looking for one or two opportunities in 24 hours, you need a bait that you can confidently cast out and leave for all that time without worrying that it's disintegrated/been nibbled away

Or one of two opportunities a season! Confidence is such a key factor. Is my bait still on, is the bait in the perfect spot, is the rig tangled or hidden in weed?

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This year I am intending to do more sessions for big fish and as this is a style of fishing that I don't have a great deal of experience at I have been doing some research, reading articles and watchi

A mate of mine has a story about National Service and fishing for cod from a lilo in a Norwegian fjord. They used to do what you suggest, but kip rather than watch telly.   One bloke disappeared.

Yes I can see the difference but anglers not being in control of tackle happens every day: An angler is using two rods and hooks a decent fish on one - when playing this fish is he/she is not in cont

Much good sense in this thread from everybody.

 

I am a bit surprised that no-one picked up on Kens point re line-hum. I am fairly conscious of this, probably because the large weights and thicker lines of deep water sea fishing result in vibrations you can feel . Personally , being deaf, I can't hear the hum any more, but remember from years back that I could hear a taut monofil line "sing" in the breeze very easily. Any vibrations from wind or water are going to get transmitted to the fish. Fish may or may not be alarmed by such vibrations, but a slack line won't generate "hum" in the first place.

 

Re the tight line spooking fish - watch the reaction of water fowl if they swim into a tight line.

 

By contrast, if a duck, moorhen or even a swan swims over the line leading to a float they almost always just lift up their legs and serenely sail over. Very rarely do they get tangled. If you regard the "intelligence" (for want of a better word for perceiving and avoiding danger) of fish as no greater (maybe a bit less) than that of wild birds then you won't be far wrong.

 

As for slack v tight line re bite indication, then either touch legering or (if the water is calm) watching the meniscus (the dimple where the line enters the water) will beat the bobbins/bite alarms hands down. However, if you want to watch TV in your bivvy until a fish hooks itself, then your buzzer is essential !!

 

 

RNLI Governor

 

World species 471 : UK species 105 : English species 95 .

Certhia's world species - 215

Eclectic "husband and wife combined" world species 501

 

"Nothing matters very much, few things matter at all" - Plato

...only things like fresh bait and cold beer...

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As for slack v tight line re bite indication, then either touch legering or (if the water is calm) watching the meniscus (the dimple where the line enters the water) will beat the bobbins/bite alarms hands down. However, if you want to watch TV in your bivvy until a fish hooks itself, then your buzzer is essential !!

But the reality and practicality of session fishing makes this redundant. Watching the line will of course give you the earliest indication of a bite, but you can't do that for 24hrs! You have to be realistic when you're fishing for a very small number of bites.

And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music

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But the reality and practicality of session fishing makes this redundant. Watching the line will of course give you the earliest indication of a bite, but you can't do that for 24hrs! You have to be realistic when you're fishing for a very small number of bites.

You have obviously never fished with the late Roger Standen ! He would touch leger for hours, even days on end! I've fished whole weekends with him and he never slept - was always alert for a bite.

 

But then, there are people who maintain that unless the angler is actually holding a rod, then whatever is taking place is set-lining, not angling. Although I don't subscribe to this extreme view, I must say that fishing with just one (held) rod is something I do more and more often .

 

 

RNLI Governor

 

World species 471 : UK species 105 : English species 95 .

Certhia's world species - 215

Eclectic "husband and wife combined" world species 501

 

"Nothing matters very much, few things matter at all" - Plato

...only things like fresh bait and cold beer...

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Blimey that is impressive - I couldn't do that, and to be honest nor would I want to!

 

I've heard all the set lining stuff before, most of it is from people who have no experience of that style of fishing and no interest in it, and think it's an easy cop-out from REAL fishing. To be fair it can be, but in many circumstances it's not just necessary but difficult, skillful, and very hard work.

And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music

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As for slack v tight line re bite indication, then either touch legering or (if the water is calm) watching the meniscus (the dimple where the line enters the water) will beat the bobbins/bite alarms hands down. However, if you want to watch TV in your bivvy until a fish hooks itself, then your buzzer is essential !!

No I've had times when fishing bolt rigs when I could have fished a slack line with no bobbins or alarms. Just rapping my main line round my big toe would have been enough to watched telly. :)

 

A tiger does not lose sleep over the opinion of sheep

 

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Just rapping my main line round my big toe would have been enough to watched telly. :)

A mate of mine has a story about National Service and fishing for cod from a lilo in a Norwegian fjord. They used to do what you suggest, but kip rather than watch telly.

 

One bloke disappeared. They eventually found the corpse still attached to a 400 lb halibut.........

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RNLI Governor

 

World species 471 : UK species 105 : English species 95 .

Certhia's world species - 215

Eclectic "husband and wife combined" world species 501

 

"Nothing matters very much, few things matter at all" - Plato

...only things like fresh bait and cold beer...

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I've said often enough that I don't like bolt rigs, and alarms while sleeping/doing something else. However I can see the reason for it at times, especially on long sessions on a water with low stock levels. The problem is that it's become almost the norm' for waters where the stock levels are high, and it's not needed. My personal dislike of the method is just that, my preference, and I would never endorse a ban on any legal method. The thing that I can't understand is when those who use it deny that it's basically 'trapping', ie, leaving a bait/s unattended, for a fish to find and hook itself. I also believe, (mostly from witnessing it), that many anglers underestimate the time it takes for them to wake, hear the alarm, exit their bivvy, and attend to their rods. In many cases it's not waking, but running round the lake from a visit to their mates.

Exhibit One.

http://www.anglersnet.co.uk/forums/index.php?/topic/5161174-keep-awake-or-reel-in/

 

John.

Angling is more than just catching fish, if it wasn't it would just be called 'catching'......... John

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